Questions

Is BartPE still useful? Why not just use a Linux live cd?

+
1 Votes
Locked

Is BartPE still useful? Why not just use a Linux live cd?

jspears80
I'm trying to build a toolkit and I have been recommended to have a BartPE CD that I can use to boot into a win32 enviroment for diagnostics. It seems this is a older technology and that a more current linux distro would be more effcient. Is this good logic?
  • +
    2 Votes
    robo_dev

    People seem to forget that you can 'roll your own' BartPE CD and add whatever plugins you need, such as AV, backup and recovery (Acronis, Macrium, Ghost), etc.

    Unless I'm missing something, I've not seen a Linux distro with as many features. Alternatives to bart are UBCD, Hirens Boot CD.

    Of course there are some very useful special-purpose Linux live distros such as BackTrack, the Nordahl Chntw disk, etc.

    +
    0 Votes
    paul.ob.tech

    I have found Bart disks full of viruses, and just because you make one doesn't mean it is really safe. Do the best scan possible to avoid infections.

    +
    1 Votes
    a.portman

    I use both Linux based CDs and Bart. The windows based GUI tools available with Bart are easier for some people to use. The important part is knowing how to use the tools on the CDs. One thing I was able to do with Bart was build a Bart CD with the drivers for my Dell PowerEdge server. Was able to read the disk, copy all of the information from the RAID drive to a 500Gb USB drive, then rebuild the RAID and copy everything back.

    +
    0 Votes
    LeonBA

    When troubleshooting Windows systems, I use the Ultimate Boot CD for Windows, which is customizable and is based on Bart. If I'm going to try to solve a problem with a Windows machine, I'd rather do it from a native Windows environment. NTFS support in Linux isn't all it could be, and the diagnostic and repair tools on the UBCDforWin are written in and specifically for Windows.

  • +
    2 Votes
    robo_dev

    People seem to forget that you can 'roll your own' BartPE CD and add whatever plugins you need, such as AV, backup and recovery (Acronis, Macrium, Ghost), etc.

    Unless I'm missing something, I've not seen a Linux distro with as many features. Alternatives to bart are UBCD, Hirens Boot CD.

    Of course there are some very useful special-purpose Linux live distros such as BackTrack, the Nordahl Chntw disk, etc.

    +
    0 Votes
    paul.ob.tech

    I have found Bart disks full of viruses, and just because you make one doesn't mean it is really safe. Do the best scan possible to avoid infections.

    +
    1 Votes
    a.portman

    I use both Linux based CDs and Bart. The windows based GUI tools available with Bart are easier for some people to use. The important part is knowing how to use the tools on the CDs. One thing I was able to do with Bart was build a Bart CD with the drivers for my Dell PowerEdge server. Was able to read the disk, copy all of the information from the RAID drive to a 500Gb USB drive, then rebuild the RAID and copy everything back.

    +
    0 Votes
    LeonBA

    When troubleshooting Windows systems, I use the Ultimate Boot CD for Windows, which is customizable and is based on Bart. If I'm going to try to solve a problem with a Windows machine, I'd rather do it from a native Windows environment. NTFS support in Linux isn't all it could be, and the diagnostic and repair tools on the UBCDforWin are written in and specifically for Windows.