Questions

Is Desktop support or IT Help Desk job helpful for experience after CCNA?

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1 Votes
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Is Desktop support or IT Help Desk job helpful for experience after CCNA?

Apoorv182
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    1 Votes
    BrandonIrdi

    Yes. Most certainly. How big is your user base, end nodes, and do you have multiple domains? How many are on your HD, SA group, and how many tier 2 issues do you troubleshoot?

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    0 Votes
    BrandonIrdi

    Just asking on the basis that the more you have to deal with, the better it is to practice netstat cmds, filtering scripts, network protocal issues, security authentication issues, and so forth.

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    1 Votes
    Apoorv182

    If you want to suggest me related to my situation & how to earn experience then please post here. Thank you in advance.

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    0 Votes
    BrandonIrdi

    No problem, I've worked in DOE facilities where the HD was actually an SA esculated Tier 2 situation. You will also gain so much experience with all different avenues of troubleshooting. You can gain the experience needed for future endeavors, and different group relations (socially and professionally). Here's an example, Network engineering may use .netstat cmds for one thing, but an SA or desktop support specialist may use .netstat -b on a client to see what apps or processes are in a connection state. Such apps like Abacus, Ansys, and so forth. Processes will also be indentified with some netstat cmds. Depending on local authentication protocols, you may be using LDAP defaults or Kerberos. Large membership AD grouping in a user's profile may require a clients pc's registry to conform to kerberos ticket sizing such as a MaxTokenSize cap. Oracle DB connections(depending on versions running) may have single signon issues. Capping the kerberos registry hash may require a top ceiling count of 16380, or if not Oracle connections are made, it can be bigger. One thing is, you will never ever stop learning. IT is so dynamic, that it never stops. Take a breath, learn, rinse and repeat. LOL (You have to once in a while).

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    1 Votes
    WmTConqror

    Brandon is correct but having a CCNA doesn't necessarily define a career course of 20 yrs. Is networking all and only what you want? What aspect of Networking, and what external experience are you willing to work at to get to that point. IT people have a variety of work that has to be done. Ask your current boss if the company you work for has any additional work or things you can do to get into "IT". Working customers and OS/HWSW issues isn't glamorous, but it's the thing that does make IT necessary.

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    1 Votes
    leichim

    Working with a number of firms the last 20 odd years, I've started out as IT Support. In my opinion it is the best way to get to know the company and it's customers.
    Second that to the experience you get in troubleshooting, I would say "Go for it!"
    I don't exactly understand what you mean with "by voice". Do you mean that you only get to "guide" your caller in to clicking here and selecting that, etc.
    That's even harder! So definitely a very educative challenge!
    A good CCNA can think outside his/her own expertise. By working ITSupport, you get a glimpse into you users' head and learn how they experience IT. That also helps you later on. Just my 2 cents.

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    1 Votes
    innocent_og

    First, I will begin by agreeing with the comment that stated that a good CCNA can think outside his/her experience. My addition to this is that the IT world is so demanding and for one to keep up to the demands, one must expand on his level of expertise. I have friends who started as programmers but later worked their way to Network administration. CCNA is like the first step into the networking world. If you plan to pursue further education or certifications like CCNP, CCIE or any other networking cert, the HD job experience will come in handy when you upgrade into something else, say Level II support Engineer. As an HD, you get to develop the other qualities and experience that you would otherwise not develop if you went straight to network/systems administration. Skills such as good written and oral communication, technical writing since you will be liaising with clients, some of whom are not tech savvy. Just go for the opportunity but keep learning.

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    1 Votes
    sbrown6

    The truth of the matter is that very few companies will hire a network engineer soley based upon a certification. Your experience will take you much further. Unfortunately the "grunt work" that we all "try" to avoid is actually endearing to employers and beneficial to your troubleshooting skill set, as others have posted. Embrace it, learn from it, and embelish it on a resume. Also, don't get too down about helpdesk work. Most level 2 helpdesk engineers can make about $35,000 to $50,000 depending where you live and who you work for.

  • +
    1 Votes
    BrandonIrdi

    Yes. Most certainly. How big is your user base, end nodes, and do you have multiple domains? How many are on your HD, SA group, and how many tier 2 issues do you troubleshoot?

    +
    0 Votes
    BrandonIrdi

    Just asking on the basis that the more you have to deal with, the better it is to practice netstat cmds, filtering scripts, network protocal issues, security authentication issues, and so forth.

    +
    1 Votes
    Apoorv182

    If you want to suggest me related to my situation & how to earn experience then please post here. Thank you in advance.

    +
    0 Votes
    BrandonIrdi

    No problem, I've worked in DOE facilities where the HD was actually an SA esculated Tier 2 situation. You will also gain so much experience with all different avenues of troubleshooting. You can gain the experience needed for future endeavors, and different group relations (socially and professionally). Here's an example, Network engineering may use .netstat cmds for one thing, but an SA or desktop support specialist may use .netstat -b on a client to see what apps or processes are in a connection state. Such apps like Abacus, Ansys, and so forth. Processes will also be indentified with some netstat cmds. Depending on local authentication protocols, you may be using LDAP defaults or Kerberos. Large membership AD grouping in a user's profile may require a clients pc's registry to conform to kerberos ticket sizing such as a MaxTokenSize cap. Oracle DB connections(depending on versions running) may have single signon issues. Capping the kerberos registry hash may require a top ceiling count of 16380, or if not Oracle connections are made, it can be bigger. One thing is, you will never ever stop learning. IT is so dynamic, that it never stops. Take a breath, learn, rinse and repeat. LOL (You have to once in a while).

    +
    1 Votes
    WmTConqror

    Brandon is correct but having a CCNA doesn't necessarily define a career course of 20 yrs. Is networking all and only what you want? What aspect of Networking, and what external experience are you willing to work at to get to that point. IT people have a variety of work that has to be done. Ask your current boss if the company you work for has any additional work or things you can do to get into "IT". Working customers and OS/HWSW issues isn't glamorous, but it's the thing that does make IT necessary.

    +
    1 Votes
    leichim

    Working with a number of firms the last 20 odd years, I've started out as IT Support. In my opinion it is the best way to get to know the company and it's customers.
    Second that to the experience you get in troubleshooting, I would say "Go for it!"
    I don't exactly understand what you mean with "by voice". Do you mean that you only get to "guide" your caller in to clicking here and selecting that, etc.
    That's even harder! So definitely a very educative challenge!
    A good CCNA can think outside his/her own expertise. By working ITSupport, you get a glimpse into you users' head and learn how they experience IT. That also helps you later on. Just my 2 cents.

    +
    1 Votes
    innocent_og

    First, I will begin by agreeing with the comment that stated that a good CCNA can think outside his/her experience. My addition to this is that the IT world is so demanding and for one to keep up to the demands, one must expand on his level of expertise. I have friends who started as programmers but later worked their way to Network administration. CCNA is like the first step into the networking world. If you plan to pursue further education or certifications like CCNP, CCIE or any other networking cert, the HD job experience will come in handy when you upgrade into something else, say Level II support Engineer. As an HD, you get to develop the other qualities and experience that you would otherwise not develop if you went straight to network/systems administration. Skills such as good written and oral communication, technical writing since you will be liaising with clients, some of whom are not tech savvy. Just go for the opportunity but keep learning.

    +
    1 Votes
    sbrown6

    The truth of the matter is that very few companies will hire a network engineer soley based upon a certification. Your experience will take you much further. Unfortunately the "grunt work" that we all "try" to avoid is actually endearing to employers and beneficial to your troubleshooting skill set, as others have posted. Embrace it, learn from it, and embelish it on a resume. Also, don't get too down about helpdesk work. Most level 2 helpdesk engineers can make about $35,000 to $50,000 depending where you live and who you work for.