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IT Consultant who is possibility moving over to full time employment. Need

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IT Consultant who is possibility moving over to full time employment. Need

tyre
I ran into a job posting online of a business in my area is looking for a full time IT manager. This company has around 32 employees and I assume it has this many pc?s. I know by being an IT consultant who primarily focus is small businesses this amount of employees shouldn?t have a need for a full time IT manager which brings my question: How should I approach this situation?
I love being an independent consultant and although the economy has slowed I am surviving but I would love some security. The owner has contacted me a day after I submitted my resume, so I believe this means something but I?m not sure. We have scheduled an interview but I am not sure what my strategy should be. Right now I still have clients who rely on me, and I know I will get questioned on this. So basically I want them as another client but this may be how should be presented during the interview. I was thinking I should allow them to ask me naturally and see if they bite or possibility if it plays out in them hire assesses the situation as ask them if they will allow me to work independently. I need help!
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    robo_dev

    " So to be perfectly honest, you don't need me...."

    If the company really just needs an IT consultant, then you can probably do that perfectly well as an independent contractor without losing your independence.

    A potential red flag would be WHY do they think they need a full-time manager for 32 employees? Do they scare away all the contractors/consultants? Is it such a mess that consultants don't want to deal with it? Is the owner a royal PITA, and he thinks he can only get what he wants by 'owning' his IT staff??

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    Snuffy09

    My first IT job was exactly that. The owners tried to own everybody and micromanage everything! They acted like they knew so much about IT that they could program XP but didnt know how to get to the control panel.

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    0 Votes
    dishneggo

    Robo has some good points..
    I had the same situation happen back in August 08. I was a contractor for 8 years in South Florida, and the economy down here, as you can imagine just stopped. I started looking around because I got to the point where I wasn't sure if I would be able to stay afloat.
    Long story short, I am very happy, managing a growing company with co-located server and 2 office locations. I was able to learn a lot and continue learning everyday. Management is great, which was a HUGE deciding factor, and also the benefits, which are now 100% covered.
    Please analyze your situation and use your best judgement. I thought I would never be happy as an IT full time, but I couldn't be happier.
    Good luck and hope it works out.

    -DM

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    0 Votes
    JohnMcGrew

    I'd gamble: I'd convince them that the position does not justify a full-time position, but what it does justify is your part-time services. Best of both worlds.

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    0 Votes
    gwhaler

    As long as you are sure of yourself, abilities & research resources, you may have a better opportunity for steady work/income then the next guy. I lived in S. Fl. also, but needed some breathing space, moved to N. Fl. where my talents are head & shoulders above anyone else around, the the work on a less stressful level, I can exceed any limitations I may have felt before & get _personal_ referrals now where I once was just another grain of sand on the beach.
    A steady job in this new climate can buy you some time until the next economic collapse.
    Never miss a paycheck or a deposit. The new economy demands some amount of independence, so be sure you're getting what you're worth. That way you can always fall back on your own.

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    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    Small companies frown upon idle IT time.

    Only 32 employees = not a lot of IT demand right? Id be skeptical of other hidden non IT related ?chores? down the line.

    Hopefully this isnt the case

    Even if it is, sounds like you have a great fall back anyways.

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    0 Votes
    Churdoo

    don't assume too obviously that the owners don't have a clue what they're talking about. If some interviewer came in thinking they knew more about my business than I did, that would just pi$$ me right off and they wouldn't get either position, full-time nor contracted. **** I wouldn't even validate their parking.

    They may have their reasons for needing full time. They may have some LOB application that requires constant upkeep but they make a ton of money so it's ok, or whatever their reason, consider the possibility that there may be a valid one. Or you may be right and they do only have basic needs and a full time (experienced) IT employee would be sitting around with his/her thumb up their butt 50% of the time.

    If you're going in under the guise of a job interview, well an interview is an interview, you have 2 ears and one mouth so use them proportionately to avoid burning a bridge in front of you, and assess from there.

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    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    I have little respect for small business owners now days (on an employee level that is). I got screwed 2 times too many.

    I believe there should be a fine line between making money and treating your employee?s right. Whereas what I experienced was 90%/10%

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    0 Votes
    dishneggo

    Robo has some good points..
    I had the same situation happen back in August 08. I was a contractor for 8 years in South Florida, and the economy down here, as you can imagine just stopped. I started looking around because I got to the point where I wasn't sure if I would be able to stay afloat.
    Long story short, I am very happy, managing a growing company with co-located server and 2 office locations. I was able to learn a lot and continue learning everyday. Management is great, which was a HUGE deciding factor, and also the benefits, which are now 100% covered.
    Please analyze your situation and use your best judgement. I thought I would never be happy as an IT full time, but I couldn't be happier.
    Good luck and hope it works out.

    -DM

    +
    0 Votes
    JohnMcGrew

    I'd gamble: I'd convince them that the position does not justify a full-time position, but what it does justify is your part-time services. Best of both worlds.

    +
    0 Votes
    gwhaler

    As long as you are sure of yourself, abilities & research resources, you may have a better opportunity for steady work/income then the next guy. I lived in S. Fl. also, but needed some breathing space, moved to N. Fl. where my talents are head & shoulders above anyone else around, the the work on a less stressful level, I can exceed any limitations I may have felt before & get _personal_ referrals now where I once was just another grain of sand on the beach.
    A steady job in this new climate can buy you some time until the next economic collapse.
    Never miss a paycheck or a deposit. The new economy demands some amount of independence, so be sure you're getting what you're worth. That way you can always fall back on your own.

    +
    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    Small companies frown upon idle IT time.

    Only 32 employees = not a lot of IT demand right? Id be skeptical of other hidden non IT related ?chores? down the line.

    Hopefully this isnt the case

    Even if it is, sounds like you have a great fall back anyways.

    +
    0 Votes
    Churdoo

    don't assume too obviously that the owners don't have a clue what they're talking about. If some interviewer came in thinking they knew more about my business than I did, that would just pi$$ me right off and they wouldn't get either position, full-time nor contracted. **** I wouldn't even validate their parking.

    They may have their reasons for needing full time. They may have some LOB application that requires constant upkeep but they make a ton of money so it's ok, or whatever their reason, consider the possibility that there may be a valid one. Or you may be right and they do only have basic needs and a full time (experienced) IT employee would be sitting around with his/her thumb up their butt 50% of the time.

    If you're going in under the guise of a job interview, well an interview is an interview, you have 2 ears and one mouth so use them proportionately to avoid burning a bridge in front of you, and assess from there.

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    " So to be perfectly honest, you don't need me...."

    If the company really just needs an IT consultant, then you can probably do that perfectly well as an independent contractor without losing your independence.

    A potential red flag would be WHY do they think they need a full-time manager for 32 employees? Do they scare away all the contractors/consultants? Is it such a mess that consultants don't want to deal with it? Is the owner a royal PITA, and he thinks he can only get what he wants by 'owning' his IT staff??

    +
    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    My first IT job was exactly that. The owners tried to own everybody and micromanage everything! They acted like they knew so much about IT that they could program XP but didnt know how to get to the control panel.

    +
    0 Votes
    dishneggo

    Robo has some good points..
    I had the same situation happen back in August 08. I was a contractor for 8 years in South Florida, and the economy down here, as you can imagine just stopped. I started looking around because I got to the point where I wasn't sure if I would be able to stay afloat.
    Long story short, I am very happy, managing a growing company with co-located server and 2 office locations. I was able to learn a lot and continue learning everyday. Management is great, which was a HUGE deciding factor, and also the benefits, which are now 100% covered.
    Please analyze your situation and use your best judgement. I thought I would never be happy as an IT full time, but I couldn't be happier.
    Good luck and hope it works out.

    -DM

    +
    0 Votes
    JohnMcGrew

    I'd gamble: I'd convince them that the position does not justify a full-time position, but what it does justify is your part-time services. Best of both worlds.

    +
    0 Votes
    gwhaler

    As long as you are sure of yourself, abilities & research resources, you may have a better opportunity for steady work/income then the next guy. I lived in S. Fl. also, but needed some breathing space, moved to N. Fl. where my talents are head & shoulders above anyone else around, the the work on a less stressful level, I can exceed any limitations I may have felt before & get _personal_ referrals now where I once was just another grain of sand on the beach.
    A steady job in this new climate can buy you some time until the next economic collapse.
    Never miss a paycheck or a deposit. The new economy demands some amount of independence, so be sure you're getting what you're worth. That way you can always fall back on your own.

    +
    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    Small companies frown upon idle IT time.

    Only 32 employees = not a lot of IT demand right? Id be skeptical of other hidden non IT related ?chores? down the line.

    Hopefully this isnt the case

    Even if it is, sounds like you have a great fall back anyways.

    +
    0 Votes
    Churdoo

    don't assume too obviously that the owners don't have a clue what they're talking about. If some interviewer came in thinking they knew more about my business than I did, that would just pi$$ me right off and they wouldn't get either position, full-time nor contracted. **** I wouldn't even validate their parking.

    They may have their reasons for needing full time. They may have some LOB application that requires constant upkeep but they make a ton of money so it's ok, or whatever their reason, consider the possibility that there may be a valid one. Or you may be right and they do only have basic needs and a full time (experienced) IT employee would be sitting around with his/her thumb up their butt 50% of the time.

    If you're going in under the guise of a job interview, well an interview is an interview, you have 2 ears and one mouth so use them proportionately to avoid burning a bridge in front of you, and assess from there.

    +
    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    I have little respect for small business owners now days (on an employee level that is). I got screwed 2 times too many.

    I believe there should be a fine line between making money and treating your employee?s right. Whereas what I experienced was 90%/10%

    +
    0 Votes
    dishneggo

    Robo has some good points..
    I had the same situation happen back in August 08. I was a contractor for 8 years in South Florida, and the economy down here, as you can imagine just stopped. I started looking around because I got to the point where I wasn't sure if I would be able to stay afloat.
    Long story short, I am very happy, managing a growing company with co-located server and 2 office locations. I was able to learn a lot and continue learning everyday. Management is great, which was a HUGE deciding factor, and also the benefits, which are now 100% covered.
    Please analyze your situation and use your best judgement. I thought I would never be happy as an IT full time, but I couldn't be happier.
    Good luck and hope it works out.

    -DM

    +
    0 Votes
    JohnMcGrew

    I'd gamble: I'd convince them that the position does not justify a full-time position, but what it does justify is your part-time services. Best of both worlds.

    +
    0 Votes
    gwhaler

    As long as you are sure of yourself, abilities & research resources, you may have a better opportunity for steady work/income then the next guy. I lived in S. Fl. also, but needed some breathing space, moved to N. Fl. where my talents are head & shoulders above anyone else around, the the work on a less stressful level, I can exceed any limitations I may have felt before & get _personal_ referrals now where I once was just another grain of sand on the beach.
    A steady job in this new climate can buy you some time until the next economic collapse.
    Never miss a paycheck or a deposit. The new economy demands some amount of independence, so be sure you're getting what you're worth. That way you can always fall back on your own.

    +
    0 Votes
    Snuffy09

    Small companies frown upon idle IT time.

    Only 32 employees = not a lot of IT demand right? Id be skeptical of other hidden non IT related ?chores? down the line.

    Hopefully this isnt the case

    Even if it is, sounds like you have a great fall back anyways.

    +
    0 Votes
    Churdoo

    don't assume too obviously that the owners don't have a clue what they're talking about. If some interviewer came in thinking they knew more about my business than I did, that would just pi$$ me right off and they wouldn't get either position, full-time nor contracted. **** I wouldn't even validate their parking.

    They may have their reasons for needing full time. They may have some LOB application that requires constant upkeep but they make a ton of money so it's ok, or whatever their reason, consider the possibility that there may be a valid one. Or you may be right and they do only have basic needs and a full time (experienced) IT employee would be sitting around with his/her thumb up their butt 50% of the time.

    If you're going in under the guise of a job interview, well an interview is an interview, you have 2 ears and one mouth so use them proportionately to avoid burning a bridge in front of you, and assess from there.