Questions

Laptop Lightning Strike

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Laptop Lightning Strike

road-dog
I have an HP laptop (ZE 4800 series) that got cooked when the building took a direct lightning strike, bad enough to take out water heaters.

The laptop tries to start but resets after ~3 seconds and continues cycling that way. I know the external adapter supplies it with DC current.

When the adapter is disconnected and I attempt to start on batteries, same symptoms. This leads me to believe that there is a DC based power supply inside.Before tearing the case apart, could anyone tell me if I'm going in the right direction? Any assistance along the way would be greatly appreciated!
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    OldER Mycroft

    Got insurance - or like most other countries, lightning strikes are considered an Act of God, much like Force Majeure (if you were in a warzone).

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    road-dog

    This computer has a legacy app that we can't get anymore. We will probably replace the platform courtesy of the insurance, but I need that app back. If I can salvace the machine, that would be simplest

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    mjd420nova

    Any number of things could have been zapped in a lightning strike. I do suspect the processor in all likelyhood took the hit and is now faulty.

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    road-dog

    is there any way that I could tell for sure? I'd like to salvage data and it would be worth a new power supply, but the processor might be over the line

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    Locrian_Lyric

    That way, you can at least retrieve the app.

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    HomusOnline

    The two places I have seen Lightning leave scorches the most is from the Power Connector, and the port the internet was in (modem or ethernet).

    Go with an obvious test of picking it up with the unit off and take sniff. If it smells burnt by the power connector, it most likely damaged your mainboard. I mainly saw things like burnt capacitors and melted traces, and like the other post, tended to take the CPU with it.

    On the upside is that many times the CD-Rom and Hard Drive were salvageable. While the damage may be extensive to the unit, your data still has hopes of being safe so that you can get your legacy app off of it.

    Make sure that when you send it in for repair, that no matter what you want the HDD either recovered, want it back, or request that if it is questionable to be left untouched. This most likely will cost a little extra, but if you can not replace the app, you will at least have the HDD to get it off of. The extent of what it would take to recover is the problem.

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    TheChas

    Yes, there are power supplies inside the laptop.
    Yes, you might be able to get the thing working.

    However, my personal experiences with lightning damaged equipment run toward "REPLACE EVERY SEMICONDUCTOR" and, every circuit board with any sign of scorching.

    Why, with the level of a surge you described, every part in the laptop has been stressed beyond the manufactures specifications.

    If you do get it running, the odds are very high for failure and or strange operation.

    In reference to the concerns about legacy applications, you might want to search ebay or the used / refurbished computer market for the same model laptop. Buy at least 2 so you have a ready spare.

    Before trying anything else, remove the hard drive, and if it runs, make a clone or an image NOW.

    Chas

  • +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Got insurance - or like most other countries, lightning strikes are considered an Act of God, much like Force Majeure (if you were in a warzone).

    +
    0 Votes
    road-dog

    This computer has a legacy app that we can't get anymore. We will probably replace the platform courtesy of the insurance, but I need that app back. If I can salvace the machine, that would be simplest

    +
    0 Votes
    mjd420nova

    Any number of things could have been zapped in a lightning strike. I do suspect the processor in all likelyhood took the hit and is now faulty.

    +
    0 Votes
    road-dog

    is there any way that I could tell for sure? I'd like to salvage data and it would be worth a new power supply, but the processor might be over the line

    +
    0 Votes
    Locrian_Lyric

    That way, you can at least retrieve the app.

    +
    0 Votes
    HomusOnline

    The two places I have seen Lightning leave scorches the most is from the Power Connector, and the port the internet was in (modem or ethernet).

    Go with an obvious test of picking it up with the unit off and take sniff. If it smells burnt by the power connector, it most likely damaged your mainboard. I mainly saw things like burnt capacitors and melted traces, and like the other post, tended to take the CPU with it.

    On the upside is that many times the CD-Rom and Hard Drive were salvageable. While the damage may be extensive to the unit, your data still has hopes of being safe so that you can get your legacy app off of it.

    Make sure that when you send it in for repair, that no matter what you want the HDD either recovered, want it back, or request that if it is questionable to be left untouched. This most likely will cost a little extra, but if you can not replace the app, you will at least have the HDD to get it off of. The extent of what it would take to recover is the problem.

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    0 Votes
    TheChas

    Yes, there are power supplies inside the laptop.
    Yes, you might be able to get the thing working.

    However, my personal experiences with lightning damaged equipment run toward "REPLACE EVERY SEMICONDUCTOR" and, every circuit board with any sign of scorching.

    Why, with the level of a surge you described, every part in the laptop has been stressed beyond the manufactures specifications.

    If you do get it running, the odds are very high for failure and or strange operation.

    In reference to the concerns about legacy applications, you might want to search ebay or the used / refurbished computer market for the same model laptop. Buy at least 2 so you have a ready spare.

    Before trying anything else, remove the hard drive, and if it runs, make a clone or an image NOW.

    Chas