Questions

Learn Linux

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Learn Linux

therrington
Is there a GOOD "learn linux" book that is written in plain English? I don't need a "dummies" ( although I feel like one! ;-D )book, but every Linux book I have ever seen assumes some level of knowledge in alternate OS terminology. They are written by "geeks" for geeks.

It would be nice to have a "beginners" book written for guys like me that have ossified brains, weak eyes, and are 60. I really want to move my netork to linux, but I can't figure out the help system, syntax or anything else.
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    Kiltie

    This is a huge area

    I, myself, am in the middle of changing from Windows to Linux, there is a lot to consider.

    Try Wiki, it may help:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HOWTO_article

    Good luck, I am going that same road too.

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    therrington

    Maybe the problem is not so much the "geek" factor, as the sheer amount of documentation to wade thru. I'm not to brilliant at defining search terms, and so my results are usually 85% non-instructive to the idea I'm looking for.

    Back to the "ossified" statement! :- )

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    Kiltie

    Not as "ossified" as yourself, but at a respectable 52 I am close.

    I am also learning Linux, I find an excellent start is Puppy.

    There are many routes, Google Puppy Linux to research, but this link is a good stepping stone, it has many very useful links within it.

    http://tmxxine.com/Wikka/wikka.php?wakka=PuppyLinux

    Puppys main advantage is it's size, for a little over 50MB you get a helluva lot.

    I'd also recommend other distros, check out this link for a good selection:

    http://www.livecdlist.com/?pick=Linux_x86&showonly=Desktop&sort=&sm=1

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    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Is exactly what you want as it supposes no knowledge about a different platform to Windows. It holds you by the hand as it walks you through how the system works and what the supposed standards actually are. Actually it covers the much more important different names for things which most newcomers at first find confusing and explains the Pro's and Con's of different things in Linux Like why KDE and Gnome are different and what each advantages are.

    For some more advanced Nix Publications there is always the individual Distro's papers on their distributions.

    You can also look at things like the Art of Linux Programing which really is a Must Have Book available here

    http://tinyurl.com/mfunu

    While you may not be interested in programing this explains how the system works.

    There is always Linux is not Windows available here

    http://tinyurl.com/8b9s6

    This is quite good though lacking a bit in the more in depth details.

    Or you could join a Linux User Group in your area you should be able to find one in the list here

    http://tinyurl.com/fu97y

    Also the different Distro's have some good publications to explain how their different flavours of Linux work so that might be useful as well.

    Never forger that MICROSOFT is an acronym which actually means Most Intelligent Customers Realise Our Software Only Fools Teenagers.

    While Puppy or DSL Dam Small Linux are good for a play around they really lack the power to do any real work, I generally use them for testing hardware when RAM is at a premium and if I have plenty of available RAM I use Knoppix STD to test the hardware and do a few other things that are useful.

    Don't get me wrong they both provide a very powerful platform to build on but most newcomers get lost quickly when they start adding the required software for their needs.

    Once you know what you want to use I would suggest that you download the Paper work that comes with that Distribution and places like Ubuntu have their own Users Forum which proves quite helpful or so I'm told.

    Lets know if I can be of any more help to you.

    Col

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    therrington

    I'll take your suggestions seriously and begin the acquisition process ;-)

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    roy.evison

    Try Kier Thomas's short Ubuntu pocket guide( available as a free pdf download) or his "Begining SUSE Linux'.

    Roy.

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    Nimmo

    This book covers basic like installation, and command line to advanced such as networking and server configuration.

  • +
    0 Votes
    Kiltie

    This is a huge area

    I, myself, am in the middle of changing from Windows to Linux, there is a lot to consider.

    Try Wiki, it may help:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HOWTO_article

    Good luck, I am going that same road too.

    +
    0 Votes
    therrington

    Maybe the problem is not so much the "geek" factor, as the sheer amount of documentation to wade thru. I'm not to brilliant at defining search terms, and so my results are usually 85% non-instructive to the idea I'm looking for.

    Back to the "ossified" statement! :- )

    +
    0 Votes
    Kiltie

    Not as "ossified" as yourself, but at a respectable 52 I am close.

    I am also learning Linux, I find an excellent start is Puppy.

    There are many routes, Google Puppy Linux to research, but this link is a good stepping stone, it has many very useful links within it.

    http://tmxxine.com/Wikka/wikka.php?wakka=PuppyLinux

    Puppys main advantage is it's size, for a little over 50MB you get a helluva lot.

    I'd also recommend other distros, check out this link for a good selection:

    http://www.livecdlist.com/?pick=Linux_x86&showonly=Desktop&sort=&sm=1

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Is exactly what you want as it supposes no knowledge about a different platform to Windows. It holds you by the hand as it walks you through how the system works and what the supposed standards actually are. Actually it covers the much more important different names for things which most newcomers at first find confusing and explains the Pro's and Con's of different things in Linux Like why KDE and Gnome are different and what each advantages are.

    For some more advanced Nix Publications there is always the individual Distro's papers on their distributions.

    You can also look at things like the Art of Linux Programing which really is a Must Have Book available here

    http://tinyurl.com/mfunu

    While you may not be interested in programing this explains how the system works.

    There is always Linux is not Windows available here

    http://tinyurl.com/8b9s6

    This is quite good though lacking a bit in the more in depth details.

    Or you could join a Linux User Group in your area you should be able to find one in the list here

    http://tinyurl.com/fu97y

    Also the different Distro's have some good publications to explain how their different flavours of Linux work so that might be useful as well.

    Never forger that MICROSOFT is an acronym which actually means Most Intelligent Customers Realise Our Software Only Fools Teenagers.

    While Puppy or DSL Dam Small Linux are good for a play around they really lack the power to do any real work, I generally use them for testing hardware when RAM is at a premium and if I have plenty of available RAM I use Knoppix STD to test the hardware and do a few other things that are useful.

    Don't get me wrong they both provide a very powerful platform to build on but most newcomers get lost quickly when they start adding the required software for their needs.

    Once you know what you want to use I would suggest that you download the Paper work that comes with that Distribution and places like Ubuntu have their own Users Forum which proves quite helpful or so I'm told.

    Lets know if I can be of any more help to you.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    therrington

    I'll take your suggestions seriously and begin the acquisition process ;-)

    +
    0 Votes
    roy.evison

    Try Kier Thomas's short Ubuntu pocket guide( available as a free pdf download) or his "Begining SUSE Linux'.

    Roy.

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    0 Votes
    Nimmo

    This book covers basic like installation, and command line to advanced such as networking and server configuration.