Questions

Learn Unix/Linux

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Learn Unix/Linux

adminmichael
Does anyone have suggestions on the fastest and easiest way to learn Linux/Unix on your own? Ive been wanting to take time to learn it as it seems like something fun to get to know how it works inside and out.

Also what Uniux/Linux Operating System would be the best to learn that would give me a feel for most unix or linux platform.

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks!
Clarifications Clarifications
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1 Votes
LeonBA
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You can be off to a good start by switching from Windows to Linux full-time. Back in 2009 I decided to make the switch. I looked into different Linux distros and settled on one that was meant to be easy to use, was well supported, and whose look and feel I was comfortable with. For me that meant Xubuntu, which I could set up to look and act like Windows 2000. For you it might be Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE, or what have you.

My recommendation would be to first back up your hard drive, then maybe image it. Then wipe the drive and install your distro of choice. (Nothing says you can't go back later and install another distro, or even reinstall Windows.) Then just use Linux day-to-day, doing all the things you normally did in Windows, which will involve a fair amount of figuring out how to do those things in Linux.

We learn by doing. Books would be a helpful supplement but probably wouldn't do nearly as much for you as just using the OS. If you're using Ubuntu or one of its derivatives, or Mint, you might find Keir Thomas's "Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference" (http://www.ubuntupocketguide.com/index_main.html) a helpful resource. It's outdated now, since it was written for version 10.10, but it's free to download and is an easy read.

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mdbizzarri
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I would recommend:
Google is your friend, and what may work for me, may not work for you. Linux Mint should be a good OS to try. It has the look and feel of Windows, and you can play around in the command line. Learn the file system and how it compares to Windows. It is different, but there are a lot of similarities. Also, don't go crazy on installing games and programs, as that could get in the way of learning. Just try to make it a working server or firewall on your network. That will give you real world experience, and forces you to learn the OS.
Play around with your .bash_profile and learn how to set up aliases. Those will help you out when you login to the command line. Case in point, instead of typing $ cd /usr/local/Secuirty, you can set up an alias so that when you type $ sec, it takes you to that directory.
Install and break it, have a goal of what you want the box to do, set it up, then wipe it out and do something else.

http://www.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Teaching/Unix/index.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/