Questions

Need some level 1 helpdesk related tasks and resolutions

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Need some level 1 helpdesk related tasks and resolutions

crysis2
Hi,

I am starting out as a level 1 helpdesk rep and i would like to know what are the general level 1 helpdesk tasks that i would have to resolve on day to day basis.

What kind of common inquiries I would be be getting and what would be the solutions to the problems??


Thanks for your help.
  • +
    0 Votes

    "The screen has a message 'Press Any Key To Continue', and the keyboard you
    supplied does not have an 'Any' key! What do I do now?"

    This is typical of level 1 A lot depends on what type of company
    you will be working for.

    +
    0 Votes
    andrew232006

    Ok, I'm not supposed to let customers know this, but the 'any' key is actually 'k'... It is normally only used for very high priviledged operations. Don't tell anyone.

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    But Wiz is right you'll get lots of questions well Demands for a possibility with the user never capable of doing anything wrong to the other side of the coin a Tech with a problem that they can not solve but as Tier 1 is their first point of call you'll have to work out very quickly that this question needs to be kicked up the chain for someone with more experience.

    Unfortunately however Tier 1 Help Desk Staff depending on where they work are encouraged to solve every problem and firmly believe after a short time that the people calling them are Idiots, and they have all the answers. I distinctly remember one Tier 1 Help Desk Staffer demanding that I delete all stored E Mails on a Surgeons Computer so that Outlook was not bogged down with too many stored files on a system with 200 MEG PST File.

    Didn't matter that I would have deleted Important Data that was not possible to replace or that someone may have died they just wanted it deleted as they had no idea of what was going wrong. After backing up which they insisted was unnecessary and deleting the PST as per their direction their next guess was to Format the HDD and reinstall the OS and all Software.

    After 45 Minutes on the phone I finally was told by the Tier 3 Guy I was speaking to that their Mail Servers where down and the was no possibility of collecting any E Mail. The previous 2 Help Desk Staff had vermently denied that it was even possible to have their E Mail System Fail and insisted that it must be on the computer I was ringing about.

    What was a simple question of Are your Mail Servers Down at the Moment turned into a 60 Minute joke with the possibility of if I had of done as told would have resulted in adverse Medical Outcomes or death and a Complete Reload with the loss of all the Customers Data.

    Though at the end of that it's quite possible that their Mail Servers would have been restored so their course of action would have worked. :^0

    Or my ISP???s Help Desk where the Cable Modem was only showing a Power On Light and nothing else they finally insisted that it had died I needed a new one which they wanted me to pay for and would take 10 days to deliver. I had rung them with a question of was their service down locally after a Auto Accident. 7 Hours latter some Linesmen appeared to restore the Cable in the Area which had been damaged when a car hit a Power Pole and brought it down. Apparently using their services when it fails for any reason is most defiantly not the best idea you should wait several hours till others have complained and then they will look into the possibility of a Service Outage.

    6 Days latter during a severe Thunderstorm when the same thing happened I got exactly the same response with exactly the same symptoms. The second time it only took 5 hours to have the Lines out to fix the water damaged link and the Tier 1 Staff refused to believe that their service was down in my area.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    Bruce Epper

    You should handle these the same way I do. Once I get a (possibly) warm body on the other end of the line, I tell them they either need to follow my instructions or boot me up to the next support level since I have been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive. It generally works.

    +
    1 Votes
    gdeangelis

    Depending on your user base, the questions you get will vary. General questions may include:
    Saving files, helping to locate files, office suite how to's like formatting, forms, tables, spreadsheets. Hardware issues, slow performance, printer problems, mouse unplugged, vga cable half out, etc. How to change a password, password resets, passwords saved incorrectly in IE. You may get inquiries about java, plug ins, or other web applications. Email questions like .pst files, archiving, missing emails, out of space, filters, away messages, forwarding, and address book issues. You may get questions from remote users. You will get questions about the line of business apps your help desk supports. You will likely receive calls about spyware, malware, or viruses and need to determine when they need to shut it down so it can be repaired or re-imaged. You may have network questions where you need to troubleshoot why they cant get to their network share or print. You will encounter driver issues, although this is much less prevalent then it used to be.
    The most important thing to remember is that most people call the help desk because they need help. They have a job to do and the pc is a tool. If they can't work, it is unproductive time. You may need to schedule time to fix an issue. You may need to get help from your peers. The end user wants assistance delivered in a friendly manner. You may be on the end of a call from time to time where you need to sort out fact from fiction. You may have you ear ripped off from time to time, but if you are good at what you do, you will build fans. Don't let the person tell you from the start what the fix is either. You can listen to their ideas, but don't assume anything until you verify it. A person with a password problem may in fact have the num lock key off. An issue you might get is that the network is down or that no one can get into program xyz. It might be two people and the cubicle they share lost power, or the issues may be completely unrelated. The key is in the questions you ask, and how you ask them. You will usually get more from your user by stating "I would like to troubleshoot this with you over the phone and I will need to ask you some questions, is that okay?" rather than saying "you need to tell me what is wrong or I can't help you." Write down the questionsyou will ask in advance. Like: Has this happened before? Did you notice anything different? Does anyone else use this device? Is anyone else having trouble? Have you tried anything yet on your own? Do you hear any noises? Is the pc warm to the touch? ASKING questions like these will help develop a rapport with your user and it will help you build your "tool box" so to speak. You will need some kind of remote access to the user pcs, which is likely already in-place. You will need to know what the user is looking at. Learn the programs they use, as much as you can. After you have resolved the issue, give the user a day or two, then follow-up with them to make sure they are still happy. Also, while you may not run into this, many shops support voip, faxes, copiers, printers, scanners, biometrics, timecard or door lock systems and many different flavors of pc's. It will do no harm to familiarize yourself with as much of this as possible. This extends to apps that your peers or specialists support directly. Know who does what in your department so you can route the call to the appropriate person. Then, ask that person who solved it to show you (if appropriate) what the fix was. This last bit should be done once you are familiar with everyone and have a good working relationship with those people. Some specialists may take offense to a new hire asking too many questions, so save this stuff for when you have some time under your belt and for when the office is not under heavy load. Lastly, set reasonable time limits to the calls. Don't keep a user on the phone for too long. And, don't let tickets fall off the radar. Nothing worse than the user calling the manager because they feel they were not helped.

    +
    0 Votes
    databaseben

    you should be asking your fellow co-workers or supervisor.

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    gdeangelis: thanks for the tips. very helpful.I am not yet employed. I am looking for a level 1 helpdesk job now. so thats why i am trying to know these things.

    can you please recommend me any helpdesk related books such as troubleshooting?? maybe an ebook???? are there any such books so i can learn further related troubleshooting guides/tips/etc????

    any related pdf downloads would be helpful.

    +
    0 Votes
    jpostrel

    I once saw a book called "Running an Effective Help Desk" It was at BN.

    +
    0 Votes
    erickvmartin76

    Also consider looking to various help desk or office product rss feeds.
    Keep in mind although there are many types of help desks there are a ton of similarities to what tools you have and what you will support.
    Consider creating your own KB of common office products.
    I.E. Outlook,Lotus Notes, Office suites 03-10. And if your not familiar with password resets in Active Directory you tube it. Download some modules so it doesn't look alien to you. Another suggestion is to take a look at Heat or Remedy. These are some of the most common ticketing systems I've used and seen on various help desks. One more thing to take into consideration is when your in a level 1 position, you may luck up on a company that has a decent knowledge base. Study the tickets, the issues,and what solutions have worked and what didn't.
    A little late with this post. Hopefully it helps.

    +
    0 Votes
    JessLowe

    All HelpDesk are different. I totally agree with some of the post that you have recieved. I have been a manager for one of the largest helpdesk in the USA. I will tell you that I never hired anyone with extreme knowledge of the products we supported. It is always best to train them on the products yourself and have a knowledgebase in place for them to use when needed. I would also say that feeding off of others and their experience is a great way to get started. I began a help desk by myself in a small room with our network manager. I was told to answer as many calls as I could and resolve them. I fed off of this guy and if he didnt know the answer, I found someone who did and made notes. I then took everything I learned and created an excel spreadsheet, Created filters for products issues and resolve. Most of the time you will find that if you want to be successful as a helpdesk representative, you will create a knowledge base and ask your peers to share theirs as well. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!!!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    i would like to know what are the common windows 7 related issues that i would get as a level 1 helpdesk rep from the users?

    what are the important features or shortcuts related to Windows XP and 7 that i should know as a level 1 helpdesk rep?


    Thanks for your help.

    +
    0 Votes
    gdeangelis

    I find the biggest issues with win7 are in how it is different from xp. User access control, 64bit issues, older office suite problems, and new Internet explorer. Other than than, you may need to search for drivers from the to time.

    +
    0 Votes
    w3techie

    That depends mostly on the company you work for. Some level one helpdesks do allow agents to do a lot more than others. I worked on a helpdesk for an investment banking company previously, and now am actually working with the same company on a different helpdesk doing level one for Coca-Cola.

    We could do quite a bit more on the banking helpdesk, and of course had to pass security clearance. I think they really had no choice but to make it so level one agents could do more because they have literally hundreds of customized applications that you simply must intuitively know how to troubleshoot when the documentation does not provide an answer.

    Mostly you should expect to resolve VPN issues, and do not underestimate the amount of knowledge you will need for non-PC endpoint devices such as smart phones. Be aware of what requires network authentication to perform, such as you obviously cannot do a network password reset for someone who is not connected to the VPN. But, there is more beyond that like changing permissions may require a network connection.

    On your first days just do everything to avoid making a mistake that will cause further inconvenience by taking your time and staying calm. Do not be ashamed to route something off if it must be routed off, because they will not be ashamed to route it right back if they know you can do it and might even tell you how.

    Once you get used to the issues users come in with the challenge is speaking well. It is sometimes hard to avoid "yeah" and "um" when the user cannot describe the problem and it sometimes is hard to not interrupt the caller. There are also ways to say things to put the user in the right frame of mind to give a response, and be able to steer the dialogue as much as you can.

    Do not assume the user knows the problem. Restate the issue if you think they may not be giving you correct information. I actually had one lady who called in unable to log into Windows, and it turned out she could not find it in her programs but was logged on. Stuff like this may be funny, but it also wastes time. So, be careful of red herrings.

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    w3techie: thanks for the response.

    but what does it actually mean when companies say "You must have excellent communication skills or people skill".

    how someone can have excellent people skill?

    for example, how should i approach the customer on the phone so that it makes me to have a good people skill???


    Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    for example, how should i approach the customer on the phone so that it makes me to have a good people skill???

    Not making them upset is a very good way to begin and to be perfectly honest it's not that easy.

    What one person may find as find another will be offended by, keeping everyone happy is very hard to do. Honestly

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    BigWoodchuck

    Exactly what you say or how you "approach the customer on the phone" is up to you and your exact personality, of course, but as a general rule you should simply speak to people the way you would want to be spoken to.

    When servicing less tech-savvy end users, the main thing you will need is patience. Try to put yourself in their shoes. Really. Also, remember not to make the mistake of thinking that a lack of computer skills implies a lack of intelligence -- though sometimes it will be tempting ;). We all have different skill sets. Just imagine yourself sitting down with a money manager who is trying to explain to you how investing in certain derivatives will be in your interest. You probably don't have the tiniest fraction of his or her knowledge in such a specific area, but I am betting you would not want that person to talk to you like you were an idiot.

    Also, remember that your "people skills" are the main thing that hiring managers are going to be looking at. It is a lot easier for the typical geek to learn new technologies / IT skills than to suddenly develop a patient, friendly personality, and the person interviewing you knows this!

    Finally, you definitely don't want to take the advice of the Bruce guy above, where he said :
    "You should handle these the same way I do. Once I get a (possibly) warm body on the other end of the line, I tell them they either need to follow my instructions or boot me up to the next support level since I have been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive. It generally works."
    I imagine that would pretty much **** off anyone. Notice that he is asking to be booted "up to the next support level" even though he has "been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive." I am betting that with a better attitude, he would have long already been at that higher support level. Instead he has all this tech experience, but is still in a lower level tech support role. Hmmmm.

    In short, just be friendly with your co-workers and treat people like you want to be treated. You'll be amazed how much better things will work out.

    +
    0 Votes
    erickvmartin76

    Excellent people skills are based in customer service metrics/requirements.
    Think of it in the terms of knowing how to react to an irate user or someone completely lost in what it is they are doing it. If you have ever worked in a call center (especially corporate) There is a certain metheod to de-sculate and stroke the ego of the user. It's one thing to know the technology but it's another to explain it to someone in crisis. (Which is everyone calling the help desk) If your stuck on "people skills" What i've always reminded my representatives in the past is: How would you explain this to your grandma?
    It's cliche but keep in mind we are all end users to some form of new tech.
    Some catch on quickly and well some others.......might need extra care.

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    Thanks for the advice. I am trying to get a helpdesk job at the moment. so thats why i want to know these tips and hints.

    So having a good people skills means you need to be friendly, respectful, fun and caring?

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Yep that's about it but you also need to be Helpful and Knowledgeable as well. Without sounding like a Know It All.

    Col

  • +
    0 Votes

    "The screen has a message 'Press Any Key To Continue', and the keyboard you
    supplied does not have an 'Any' key! What do I do now?"

    This is typical of level 1 A lot depends on what type of company
    you will be working for.

    +
    0 Votes
    andrew232006

    Ok, I'm not supposed to let customers know this, but the 'any' key is actually 'k'... It is normally only used for very high priviledged operations. Don't tell anyone.

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    But Wiz is right you'll get lots of questions well Demands for a possibility with the user never capable of doing anything wrong to the other side of the coin a Tech with a problem that they can not solve but as Tier 1 is their first point of call you'll have to work out very quickly that this question needs to be kicked up the chain for someone with more experience.

    Unfortunately however Tier 1 Help Desk Staff depending on where they work are encouraged to solve every problem and firmly believe after a short time that the people calling them are Idiots, and they have all the answers. I distinctly remember one Tier 1 Help Desk Staffer demanding that I delete all stored E Mails on a Surgeons Computer so that Outlook was not bogged down with too many stored files on a system with 200 MEG PST File.

    Didn't matter that I would have deleted Important Data that was not possible to replace or that someone may have died they just wanted it deleted as they had no idea of what was going wrong. After backing up which they insisted was unnecessary and deleting the PST as per their direction their next guess was to Format the HDD and reinstall the OS and all Software.

    After 45 Minutes on the phone I finally was told by the Tier 3 Guy I was speaking to that their Mail Servers where down and the was no possibility of collecting any E Mail. The previous 2 Help Desk Staff had vermently denied that it was even possible to have their E Mail System Fail and insisted that it must be on the computer I was ringing about.

    What was a simple question of Are your Mail Servers Down at the Moment turned into a 60 Minute joke with the possibility of if I had of done as told would have resulted in adverse Medical Outcomes or death and a Complete Reload with the loss of all the Customers Data.

    Though at the end of that it's quite possible that their Mail Servers would have been restored so their course of action would have worked. :^0

    Or my ISP???s Help Desk where the Cable Modem was only showing a Power On Light and nothing else they finally insisted that it had died I needed a new one which they wanted me to pay for and would take 10 days to deliver. I had rung them with a question of was their service down locally after a Auto Accident. 7 Hours latter some Linesmen appeared to restore the Cable in the Area which had been damaged when a car hit a Power Pole and brought it down. Apparently using their services when it fails for any reason is most defiantly not the best idea you should wait several hours till others have complained and then they will look into the possibility of a Service Outage.

    6 Days latter during a severe Thunderstorm when the same thing happened I got exactly the same response with exactly the same symptoms. The second time it only took 5 hours to have the Lines out to fix the water damaged link and the Tier 1 Staff refused to believe that their service was down in my area.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    Bruce Epper

    You should handle these the same way I do. Once I get a (possibly) warm body on the other end of the line, I tell them they either need to follow my instructions or boot me up to the next support level since I have been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive. It generally works.

    +
    1 Votes
    gdeangelis

    Depending on your user base, the questions you get will vary. General questions may include:
    Saving files, helping to locate files, office suite how to's like formatting, forms, tables, spreadsheets. Hardware issues, slow performance, printer problems, mouse unplugged, vga cable half out, etc. How to change a password, password resets, passwords saved incorrectly in IE. You may get inquiries about java, plug ins, or other web applications. Email questions like .pst files, archiving, missing emails, out of space, filters, away messages, forwarding, and address book issues. You may get questions from remote users. You will get questions about the line of business apps your help desk supports. You will likely receive calls about spyware, malware, or viruses and need to determine when they need to shut it down so it can be repaired or re-imaged. You may have network questions where you need to troubleshoot why they cant get to their network share or print. You will encounter driver issues, although this is much less prevalent then it used to be.
    The most important thing to remember is that most people call the help desk because they need help. They have a job to do and the pc is a tool. If they can't work, it is unproductive time. You may need to schedule time to fix an issue. You may need to get help from your peers. The end user wants assistance delivered in a friendly manner. You may be on the end of a call from time to time where you need to sort out fact from fiction. You may have you ear ripped off from time to time, but if you are good at what you do, you will build fans. Don't let the person tell you from the start what the fix is either. You can listen to their ideas, but don't assume anything until you verify it. A person with a password problem may in fact have the num lock key off. An issue you might get is that the network is down or that no one can get into program xyz. It might be two people and the cubicle they share lost power, or the issues may be completely unrelated. The key is in the questions you ask, and how you ask them. You will usually get more from your user by stating "I would like to troubleshoot this with you over the phone and I will need to ask you some questions, is that okay?" rather than saying "you need to tell me what is wrong or I can't help you." Write down the questionsyou will ask in advance. Like: Has this happened before? Did you notice anything different? Does anyone else use this device? Is anyone else having trouble? Have you tried anything yet on your own? Do you hear any noises? Is the pc warm to the touch? ASKING questions like these will help develop a rapport with your user and it will help you build your "tool box" so to speak. You will need some kind of remote access to the user pcs, which is likely already in-place. You will need to know what the user is looking at. Learn the programs they use, as much as you can. After you have resolved the issue, give the user a day or two, then follow-up with them to make sure they are still happy. Also, while you may not run into this, many shops support voip, faxes, copiers, printers, scanners, biometrics, timecard or door lock systems and many different flavors of pc's. It will do no harm to familiarize yourself with as much of this as possible. This extends to apps that your peers or specialists support directly. Know who does what in your department so you can route the call to the appropriate person. Then, ask that person who solved it to show you (if appropriate) what the fix was. This last bit should be done once you are familiar with everyone and have a good working relationship with those people. Some specialists may take offense to a new hire asking too many questions, so save this stuff for when you have some time under your belt and for when the office is not under heavy load. Lastly, set reasonable time limits to the calls. Don't keep a user on the phone for too long. And, don't let tickets fall off the radar. Nothing worse than the user calling the manager because they feel they were not helped.

    +
    0 Votes
    databaseben

    you should be asking your fellow co-workers or supervisor.

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    gdeangelis: thanks for the tips. very helpful.I am not yet employed. I am looking for a level 1 helpdesk job now. so thats why i am trying to know these things.

    can you please recommend me any helpdesk related books such as troubleshooting?? maybe an ebook???? are there any such books so i can learn further related troubleshooting guides/tips/etc????

    any related pdf downloads would be helpful.

    +
    0 Votes
    jpostrel

    I once saw a book called "Running an Effective Help Desk" It was at BN.

    +
    0 Votes
    erickvmartin76

    Also consider looking to various help desk or office product rss feeds.
    Keep in mind although there are many types of help desks there are a ton of similarities to what tools you have and what you will support.
    Consider creating your own KB of common office products.
    I.E. Outlook,Lotus Notes, Office suites 03-10. And if your not familiar with password resets in Active Directory you tube it. Download some modules so it doesn't look alien to you. Another suggestion is to take a look at Heat or Remedy. These are some of the most common ticketing systems I've used and seen on various help desks. One more thing to take into consideration is when your in a level 1 position, you may luck up on a company that has a decent knowledge base. Study the tickets, the issues,and what solutions have worked and what didn't.
    A little late with this post. Hopefully it helps.

    +
    0 Votes
    JessLowe

    All HelpDesk are different. I totally agree with some of the post that you have recieved. I have been a manager for one of the largest helpdesk in the USA. I will tell you that I never hired anyone with extreme knowledge of the products we supported. It is always best to train them on the products yourself and have a knowledgebase in place for them to use when needed. I would also say that feeding off of others and their experience is a great way to get started. I began a help desk by myself in a small room with our network manager. I was told to answer as many calls as I could and resolve them. I fed off of this guy and if he didnt know the answer, I found someone who did and made notes. I then took everything I learned and created an excel spreadsheet, Created filters for products issues and resolve. Most of the time you will find that if you want to be successful as a helpdesk representative, you will create a knowledge base and ask your peers to share theirs as well. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!!!!!

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    i would like to know what are the common windows 7 related issues that i would get as a level 1 helpdesk rep from the users?

    what are the important features or shortcuts related to Windows XP and 7 that i should know as a level 1 helpdesk rep?


    Thanks for your help.

    +
    0 Votes
    gdeangelis

    I find the biggest issues with win7 are in how it is different from xp. User access control, 64bit issues, older office suite problems, and new Internet explorer. Other than than, you may need to search for drivers from the to time.

    +
    0 Votes
    w3techie

    That depends mostly on the company you work for. Some level one helpdesks do allow agents to do a lot more than others. I worked on a helpdesk for an investment banking company previously, and now am actually working with the same company on a different helpdesk doing level one for Coca-Cola.

    We could do quite a bit more on the banking helpdesk, and of course had to pass security clearance. I think they really had no choice but to make it so level one agents could do more because they have literally hundreds of customized applications that you simply must intuitively know how to troubleshoot when the documentation does not provide an answer.

    Mostly you should expect to resolve VPN issues, and do not underestimate the amount of knowledge you will need for non-PC endpoint devices such as smart phones. Be aware of what requires network authentication to perform, such as you obviously cannot do a network password reset for someone who is not connected to the VPN. But, there is more beyond that like changing permissions may require a network connection.

    On your first days just do everything to avoid making a mistake that will cause further inconvenience by taking your time and staying calm. Do not be ashamed to route something off if it must be routed off, because they will not be ashamed to route it right back if they know you can do it and might even tell you how.

    Once you get used to the issues users come in with the challenge is speaking well. It is sometimes hard to avoid "yeah" and "um" when the user cannot describe the problem and it sometimes is hard to not interrupt the caller. There are also ways to say things to put the user in the right frame of mind to give a response, and be able to steer the dialogue as much as you can.

    Do not assume the user knows the problem. Restate the issue if you think they may not be giving you correct information. I actually had one lady who called in unable to log into Windows, and it turned out she could not find it in her programs but was logged on. Stuff like this may be funny, but it also wastes time. So, be careful of red herrings.

    +
    0 Votes
    crysis2

    w3techie: thanks for the response.

    but what does it actually mean when companies say "You must have excellent communication skills or people skill".

    how someone can have excellent people skill?

    for example, how should i approach the customer on the phone so that it makes me to have a good people skill???


    Thanks.

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    for example, how should i approach the customer on the phone so that it makes me to have a good people skill???

    Not making them upset is a very good way to begin and to be perfectly honest it's not that easy.

    What one person may find as find another will be offended by, keeping everyone happy is very hard to do. Honestly

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    BigWoodchuck

    Exactly what you say or how you "approach the customer on the phone" is up to you and your exact personality, of course, but as a general rule you should simply speak to people the way you would want to be spoken to.

    When servicing less tech-savvy end users, the main thing you will need is patience. Try to put yourself in their shoes. Really. Also, remember not to make the mistake of thinking that a lack of computer skills implies a lack of intelligence -- though sometimes it will be tempting ;). We all have different skill sets. Just imagine yourself sitting down with a money manager who is trying to explain to you how investing in certain derivatives will be in your interest. You probably don't have the tiniest fraction of his or her knowledge in such a specific area, but I am betting you would not want that person to talk to you like you were an idiot.

    Also, remember that your "people skills" are the main thing that hiring managers are going to be looking at. It is a lot easier for the typical geek to learn new technologies / IT skills than to suddenly develop a patient, friendly personality, and the person interviewing you knows this!

    Finally, you definitely don't want to take the advice of the Bruce guy above, where he said :
    "You should handle these the same way I do. Once I get a (possibly) warm body on the other end of the line, I tell them they either need to follow my instructions or boot me up to the next support level since I have been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive. It generally works."
    I imagine that would pretty much **** off anyone. Notice that he is asking to be booted "up to the next support level" even though he has "been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive." I am betting that with a better attitude, he would have long already been at that higher support level. Instead he has all this tech experience, but is still in a lower level tech support role. Hmmmm.

    In short, just be friendly with your co-workers and treat people like you want to be treated. You'll be amazed how much better things will work out.

    +
    0 Votes
    erickvmartin76

    Excellent people skills are based in customer service metrics/requirements.
    Think of it in the terms of knowing how to react to an irate user or someone completely lost in what it is they are doing it. If you have ever worked in a call center (especially corporate) There is a certain metheod to de-sculate and stroke the ego of the user. It's one thing to know the technology but it's another to explain it to someone in crisis. (Which is everyone calling the help desk) If your stuck on "people skills" What i've always reminded my representatives in the past is: How would you explain this to your grandma?
    It's cliche but keep in mind we are all end users to some form of new tech.
    Some catch on quickly and well some others.......might need extra care.

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    crysis2

    Thanks for the advice. I am trying to get a helpdesk job at the moment. so thats why i want to know these tips and hints.

    So having a good people skills means you need to be friendly, respectful, fun and caring?

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    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Yep that's about it but you also need to be Helpful and Knowledgeable as well. Without sounding like a Know It All.

    Col