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Need some level 1 helpdesk related tasks and resolutions

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Need some level 1 helpdesk related tasks and resolutions

crysis2
Hi,

I am starting out as a level 1 helpdesk rep and i would like to know what are the general level 1 helpdesk tasks that i would have to resolve on day to day basis.

What kind of common inquiries I would be be getting and what would be the solutions to the problems??


Thanks for your help.
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crysis2
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i would like to know what are the common windows 7 related issues that i would get as a level 1 helpdesk rep from the users?

what are the important features or shortcuts related to Windows XP and 7 that i should know as a level 1 helpdesk rep?


Thanks for your help.

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gdeangelis
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I find the biggest issues with win7 are in how it is different from xp. User access control, 64bit issues, older office suite problems, and new Internet explorer. Other than than, you may need to search for drivers from the to time.

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w3techie
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That depends mostly on the company you work for. Some level one helpdesks do allow agents to do a lot more than others. I worked on a helpdesk for an investment banking company previously, and now am actually working with the same company on a different helpdesk doing level one for Coca-Cola.

We could do quite a bit more on the banking helpdesk, and of course had to pass security clearance. I think they really had no choice but to make it so level one agents could do more because they have literally hundreds of customized applications that you simply must intuitively know how to troubleshoot when the documentation does not provide an answer.

Mostly you should expect to resolve VPN issues, and do not underestimate the amount of knowledge you will need for non-PC endpoint devices such as smart phones. Be aware of what requires network authentication to perform, such as you obviously cannot do a network password reset for someone who is not connected to the VPN. But, there is more beyond that like changing permissions may require a network connection.

On your first days just do everything to avoid making a mistake that will cause further inconvenience by taking your time and staying calm. Do not be ashamed to route something off if it must be routed off, because they will not be ashamed to route it right back if they know you can do it and might even tell you how.

Once you get used to the issues users come in with the challenge is speaking well. It is sometimes hard to avoid "yeah" and "um" when the user cannot describe the problem and it sometimes is hard to not interrupt the caller. There are also ways to say things to put the user in the right frame of mind to give a response, and be able to steer the dialogue as much as you can.

Do not assume the user knows the problem. Restate the issue if you think they may not be giving you correct information. I actually had one lady who called in unable to log into Windows, and it turned out she could not find it in her programs but was logged on. Stuff like this may be funny, but it also wastes time. So, be careful of red herrings.

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crysis2
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w3techie: thanks for the response.

but what does it actually mean when companies say "You must have excellent communication skills or people skill".

how someone can have excellent people skill?

for example, how should i approach the customer on the phone so that it makes me to have a good people skill???


Thanks.

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HAL 9000 Moderator
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for example, how should i approach the customer on the phone so that it makes me to have a good people skill???

Not making them upset is a very good way to begin and to be perfectly honest it's not that easy.

What one person may find as find another will be offended by, keeping everyone happy is very hard to do. Honestly

Col

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BigWoodchuck
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Exactly what you say or how you "approach the customer on the phone" is up to you and your exact personality, of course, but as a general rule you should simply speak to people the way you would want to be spoken to.

When servicing less tech-savvy end users, the main thing you will need is patience. Try to put yourself in their shoes. Really. Also, remember not to make the mistake of thinking that a lack of computer skills implies a lack of intelligence -- though sometimes it will be tempting ;). We all have different skill sets. Just imagine yourself sitting down with a money manager who is trying to explain to you how investing in certain derivatives will be in your interest. You probably don't have the tiniest fraction of his or her knowledge in such a specific area, but I am betting you would not want that person to talk to you like you were an idiot.

Also, remember that your "people skills" are the main thing that hiring managers are going to be looking at. It is a lot easier for the typical geek to learn new technologies / IT skills than to suddenly develop a patient, friendly personality, and the person interviewing you knows this!

Finally, you definitely don't want to take the advice of the Bruce guy above, where he said :
"You should handle these the same way I do. Once I get a (possibly) warm body on the other end of the line, I tell them they either need to follow my instructions or boot me up to the next support level since I have been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive. It generally works."
I imagine that would pretty much **** off anyone. Notice that he is asking to be booted "up to the next support level" even though he has "been troubleshooting electronics and computers for longer than they have been alive." I am betting that with a better attitude, he would have long already been at that higher support level. Instead he has all this tech experience, but is still in a lower level tech support role. Hmmmm.

In short, just be friendly with your co-workers and treat people like you want to be treated. You'll be amazed how much better things will work out.

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erickvmartin76
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Excellent people skills are based in customer service metrics/requirements.
Think of it in the terms of knowing how to react to an irate user or someone completely lost in what it is they are doing it. If you have ever worked in a call center (especially corporate) There is a certain metheod to de-sculate and stroke the ego of the user. It's one thing to know the technology but it's another to explain it to someone in crisis. (Which is everyone calling the help desk) If your stuck on "people skills" What i've always reminded my representatives in the past is: How would you explain this to your grandma?
It's cliche but keep in mind we are all end users to some form of new tech.
Some catch on quickly and well some others.......might need extra care.

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crysis2
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Thanks for the advice. I am trying to get a helpdesk job at the moment. so thats why i want to know these tips and hints.

So having a good people skills means you need to be friendly, respectful, fun and caring?

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HAL 9000 Moderator
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Yep that's about it but you also need to be Helpful and Knowledgeable as well. Without sounding like a Know It All.

Col

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gdeangelis
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Take good notes. Don't speak over the end user. Ask good questions. Really listen to them. Listen for their tone. Listen for hostility/frustration. Speak in a calm but never condescending manner. Learn your customers. Learn to sense their frustrations. When the call is done, if it was a difficult issue, give the user a call or email if appropriate. Let them know you are there to help with future issues. Tell them what you are going to do. And, if you can teach them something along the way, you will be appreciated.