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Networking Linux and Windows together

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Networking Linux and Windows together

caseih2828
Hello, I have a question. I am trying to network Suse Professioal 9.2 and windows XP thru Wireless G router. Although linux pc is a direct connect. I am wondering how I can network the 2 pc together so they can "talk" read each other pcs. without the use of a server. any answer/help would be much appreciated. Thanks. Email me the answer Please.
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    Toivo Talikka

    Suse should have Samba available which gives you the SMB, or Server Message Block protocol, implementing the Linux box as a Windows file server.

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    daveo2000

    As opposed to saying that you don't want a server, turn your Linux box into the file server. Keep in mind that using this, it will be easier for the windows box to see Linux files than for the Linux box to see windows files.

    I expect that there is a way for Samba to "see" windows shared folders but I don't know what that is.

    Check out the on-line help at

    http://us3.samba.org/samba/

    There is a "Quick and Dirty HOW TO" on Linux.com. I haven't read it but it is likely to be good.

    http://www.linux.com/article.pl?sid=06/11/20/207251

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    Le petit Fer

    Have you ever programmed directly the sockets API?
    Sockets are implemented in a different way in Unix and in Windows, because they were first in UNIX and are a part of the operating systems and an API in Windows. Besides this, they are basically the same thing. Furthermore, if you program in Java, they look exactly the same in both systems.
    What you are trying to do is called peer-to-peer connection (no server). This means any one of the machines is at one time the server meanwhile the other is the client, but their role can change with any time.
    Sockets are the underground of any TCP/IP application. They are free, come with the system.
    Of course, you start from the beginning, without any added conveniences.
    Have fun.

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    daveo2000

    What is the actual purpose of "networking" them together?

    If for file access then Samba.

    If for "generic" programmatical access (function to function) then sockets would make sense.

    If for web services then they both just need to have their TCP/IP layers set up and basic networking functionality available. Then you would only need to ensure that web services are running on the target machine.

    He could even be looking for sharing a printer in which case a "network printer" like an all-in-one HP 2500 series (probably no longer for sale) would fill the bill.

    One could even go out on the limb of improbability and say he might only want to have them share a common mains adapter ("wall plug" in the US) in which case he could buy a power strip.

    Answers can be right but useless if the question is not specific enough!

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    0 Votes
    Toivo Talikka

    Suse should have Samba available which gives you the SMB, or Server Message Block protocol, implementing the Linux box as a Windows file server.

    +
    0 Votes
    daveo2000

    As opposed to saying that you don't want a server, turn your Linux box into the file server. Keep in mind that using this, it will be easier for the windows box to see Linux files than for the Linux box to see windows files.

    I expect that there is a way for Samba to "see" windows shared folders but I don't know what that is.

    Check out the on-line help at

    http://us3.samba.org/samba/

    There is a "Quick and Dirty HOW TO" on Linux.com. I haven't read it but it is likely to be good.

    http://www.linux.com/article.pl?sid=06/11/20/207251

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    0 Votes
    Le petit Fer

    Have you ever programmed directly the sockets API?
    Sockets are implemented in a different way in Unix and in Windows, because they were first in UNIX and are a part of the operating systems and an API in Windows. Besides this, they are basically the same thing. Furthermore, if you program in Java, they look exactly the same in both systems.
    What you are trying to do is called peer-to-peer connection (no server). This means any one of the machines is at one time the server meanwhile the other is the client, but their role can change with any time.
    Sockets are the underground of any TCP/IP application. They are free, come with the system.
    Of course, you start from the beginning, without any added conveniences.
    Have fun.

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    0 Votes
    daveo2000

    What is the actual purpose of "networking" them together?

    If for file access then Samba.

    If for "generic" programmatical access (function to function) then sockets would make sense.

    If for web services then they both just need to have their TCP/IP layers set up and basic networking functionality available. Then you would only need to ensure that web services are running on the target machine.

    He could even be looking for sharing a printer in which case a "network printer" like an all-in-one HP 2500 series (probably no longer for sale) would fill the bill.

    One could even go out on the limb of improbability and say he might only want to have them share a common mains adapter ("wall plug" in the US) in which case he could buy a power strip.

    Answers can be right but useless if the question is not specific enough!