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PC keeps losing visual

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PC keeps losing visual

jrmyelam411
I'm working on my father's PC as he keeps losing visual. He has a E-machine T6538 desktop. AMD Athlon 64, 512 memeory , 200 gig hard drive, with a built in Nvidia video card at 256mb. I have ran disk cleanup, defrag, Ccleaner, registry mechanic, updated video card driver and direct x, cut down his start up applications in msconfig to the bare min checked for viruses and spyware but still nothing. The pc seems to lose visual often but is still running. Sometimes if I wait it will come back other times it wont and I have to reboot, and that does not always bring it back up. I have replaced the moniter and tried it on mine as well and get the same results. Any help would be great. Thanks in advance.
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    mikeadams1137

    Hm. Need some more intel...the 256 MB video card you talk about that...is this an actual video card..inserted into an AGP/PCI Express/PCI slot? Or is it...an on-board video, and it just shares memory...

    Depending on...You have done everything, and we can verify its not the monitor...I can tell you now...Windows won't cause a problem with video showing up...you will always see something, whether or not its Windows, depends :)...sounds like the video card is going bad...Recommended steps..

    1) Verify if its a removeable Video Card or an Onboard.

    2) If it is removeable...you will want to swap it out with another card, if the PC is still under warranty...request one from E-Machines, they are pretty good about that.

    3) If it is onboard...bit more complicated...but...this I can tell you...

    What I need to know...right before the monitor cuts out...does the light on the monitor "stay green and stay on" or does it "stay green and flash" or does it "turn yellow and flash?" I'll keep checking this, update me!

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    jrmyelam411

    Yes it is an onboard video card. When it does go out the moniter light stays green and stays on. Thanks in advance

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    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Of Video Feed that it can not display.

    As you can change the amount of RAM set aside for the Video I would try reducing it to the minimum allowable and allow the Computer to have as much RAM as possible available for it's use.

    Also check the Refresh Rates for the Video Adaptor and a RAM check wouldn't hurt as once you loose the Video you are no longer sure of just what the computer is actually doing if anything. It could be that the Computer is falling over and Windows has ceased to work so you are no longer getting a readable Video Feed.

    I would really try a Live Linux and see if the problem persists if it does you defiantly have a Hardware problem and if it works you have to reinstall Windows and all the necessary drivers,Patches, Service Packs and the like.

    Remember that in the not so distant past a lot of Windows Patches did far more harm than good and you had to be very careful of installing them so it's possible that one of the recently applied Patches has caused this problem.

    You can get a Live Linux ISO download from here

    http://tinyurl.com/23nmq

    Something like Puppy Linux is small only about 50 MEG so it would be a fast download for you but if you need something with a bit more clout Knoppix would be a better bet but it's the size of a CD so it's going to take longer to download.

    Col

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    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    There is something wrong with the specs that you've listed,. According the the E-Machines Web Site the T6538 Has an Integrated Video capable of using up to 128 MB of RAM for Video not 256. The Specs are as follows

    CPU: AMD Athlon? 64 3500+ processor with AMD 64 Technology
    (2.20GHz, 2000MHz system bus, 512KB L2 cache)
    Operating System: Genuine Microsoft? Windows? XP Media Center Edition 2005
    Chipset: NVIDIA? GeForce? 6100
    Memory: 512MB DDR (1 ? 512MB), 400MHz (PC3200)
    Dual-channel capable; Expandable to 4GB
    Hard Drive: 200GB (7200rpm, 2MB cache)
    Optical Drive: 16x multiformat dual-layer DVD?RW
    (Up to 8.5GB with dual-layer media)
    Write max: 16x DVD?R, 6x DVD-RW, 8x DVD+RW, 4x DVD+R DL, 40x CD-R, 24x CD-RW
    Read max: 16x DVD-ROM, 40x CD-ROM
    Video: NVIDIA? GeForce? 6100 integrated graphics solution
    Up to 128MB of shared video memory
    PCI Express (PCIe x16) slot available
    Sound: 6-channel (5.1) high-definition audio
    Network: 10/100Mbps integrated Ethernet LAN (RJ-45 port)
    Modem: 56K ITU V.92-ready fax/modem (RJ-11 port)
    Peripherals: Premium multimedia keyboard, 2-button wheel mouse, amplified stereo speakers (USB powered)
    Dimensions: 14.25"H x 7.25"W x 16"D
    Weight: 22.5lbs


    However if there is a PCI XPress Video Card in the PCI XPress socket that could be a different story and you could try running the system off the On Board Video and see if the problem persists.

    Personally I would set the Video to 64 MEG and see how it works from there with the case closed if it keeps dropping out it sounds like a Heat Problem where something is getting way too hot and stops working so you can check for any fans that are not running or any heat sinks not properly attached.

    I agree with the previous poster it's important to know what the Standby Function of the Monitor is actually doing as that will tell you if the Monitor is getting any Video feed or not as you've changed the monitor the problem should be on the M'Board if the unit is as it left the factory but you should also check the refresh setting of the Video Adaptor as it could be set way too high and cause the problem as well.

    It also wouldn't hurt to run a RAM Test to check out the RAM as it's possible that the stick has gone/is bad and is causing this problem as everything is running off the 1 stick so if it goes/is faulty you'll have all sorts of problems.

    I personally would recommend the RAM checker off the Ultimate Boot CD available free to download here

    http://tinyurl.com/3jnpy

    But you may have something smaller that you can use quickly. While I don't think that this is a software problem it wouldn't hurt to check it out by trying a Live Linux that runs off a CD and doesn't use the existing OS. It's just possible that the Video Driver is causing a problem in the Windows Kernel so no harm will be done by dropping in a Live Linux and running off that though I don't think that it will be the problem it's worth checking out.

    If you don't have a copy of a Live Linux available you should be able to get one from a Newsagent as a Cover Disc on any Linux Mag or you can download or buy one from here for a few cents or free.

    http://tinyurl.com/23nmq

    It's just possible that the CPU is breaking down as it's doing the work of a CPU & GPU at the same time so it's working harder than a normal CPU does.

    Col

  • +
    0 Votes
    mikeadams1137

    Hm. Need some more intel...the 256 MB video card you talk about that...is this an actual video card..inserted into an AGP/PCI Express/PCI slot? Or is it...an on-board video, and it just shares memory...

    Depending on...You have done everything, and we can verify its not the monitor...I can tell you now...Windows won't cause a problem with video showing up...you will always see something, whether or not its Windows, depends :)...sounds like the video card is going bad...Recommended steps..

    1) Verify if its a removeable Video Card or an Onboard.

    2) If it is removeable...you will want to swap it out with another card, if the PC is still under warranty...request one from E-Machines, they are pretty good about that.

    3) If it is onboard...bit more complicated...but...this I can tell you...

    What I need to know...right before the monitor cuts out...does the light on the monitor "stay green and stay on" or does it "stay green and flash" or does it "turn yellow and flash?" I'll keep checking this, update me!

    +
    0 Votes
    jrmyelam411

    Yes it is an onboard video card. When it does go out the moniter light stays green and stays on. Thanks in advance

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Of Video Feed that it can not display.

    As you can change the amount of RAM set aside for the Video I would try reducing it to the minimum allowable and allow the Computer to have as much RAM as possible available for it's use.

    Also check the Refresh Rates for the Video Adaptor and a RAM check wouldn't hurt as once you loose the Video you are no longer sure of just what the computer is actually doing if anything. It could be that the Computer is falling over and Windows has ceased to work so you are no longer getting a readable Video Feed.

    I would really try a Live Linux and see if the problem persists if it does you defiantly have a Hardware problem and if it works you have to reinstall Windows and all the necessary drivers,Patches, Service Packs and the like.

    Remember that in the not so distant past a lot of Windows Patches did far more harm than good and you had to be very careful of installing them so it's possible that one of the recently applied Patches has caused this problem.

    You can get a Live Linux ISO download from here

    http://tinyurl.com/23nmq

    Something like Puppy Linux is small only about 50 MEG so it would be a fast download for you but if you need something with a bit more clout Knoppix would be a better bet but it's the size of a CD so it's going to take longer to download.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    There is something wrong with the specs that you've listed,. According the the E-Machines Web Site the T6538 Has an Integrated Video capable of using up to 128 MB of RAM for Video not 256. The Specs are as follows

    CPU: AMD Athlon? 64 3500+ processor with AMD 64 Technology
    (2.20GHz, 2000MHz system bus, 512KB L2 cache)
    Operating System: Genuine Microsoft? Windows? XP Media Center Edition 2005
    Chipset: NVIDIA? GeForce? 6100
    Memory: 512MB DDR (1 ? 512MB), 400MHz (PC3200)
    Dual-channel capable; Expandable to 4GB
    Hard Drive: 200GB (7200rpm, 2MB cache)
    Optical Drive: 16x multiformat dual-layer DVD?RW
    (Up to 8.5GB with dual-layer media)
    Write max: 16x DVD?R, 6x DVD-RW, 8x DVD+RW, 4x DVD+R DL, 40x CD-R, 24x CD-RW
    Read max: 16x DVD-ROM, 40x CD-ROM
    Video: NVIDIA? GeForce? 6100 integrated graphics solution
    Up to 128MB of shared video memory
    PCI Express (PCIe x16) slot available
    Sound: 6-channel (5.1) high-definition audio
    Network: 10/100Mbps integrated Ethernet LAN (RJ-45 port)
    Modem: 56K ITU V.92-ready fax/modem (RJ-11 port)
    Peripherals: Premium multimedia keyboard, 2-button wheel mouse, amplified stereo speakers (USB powered)
    Dimensions: 14.25"H x 7.25"W x 16"D
    Weight: 22.5lbs


    However if there is a PCI XPress Video Card in the PCI XPress socket that could be a different story and you could try running the system off the On Board Video and see if the problem persists.

    Personally I would set the Video to 64 MEG and see how it works from there with the case closed if it keeps dropping out it sounds like a Heat Problem where something is getting way too hot and stops working so you can check for any fans that are not running or any heat sinks not properly attached.

    I agree with the previous poster it's important to know what the Standby Function of the Monitor is actually doing as that will tell you if the Monitor is getting any Video feed or not as you've changed the monitor the problem should be on the M'Board if the unit is as it left the factory but you should also check the refresh setting of the Video Adaptor as it could be set way too high and cause the problem as well.

    It also wouldn't hurt to run a RAM Test to check out the RAM as it's possible that the stick has gone/is bad and is causing this problem as everything is running off the 1 stick so if it goes/is faulty you'll have all sorts of problems.

    I personally would recommend the RAM checker off the Ultimate Boot CD available free to download here

    http://tinyurl.com/3jnpy

    But you may have something smaller that you can use quickly. While I don't think that this is a software problem it wouldn't hurt to check it out by trying a Live Linux that runs off a CD and doesn't use the existing OS. It's just possible that the Video Driver is causing a problem in the Windows Kernel so no harm will be done by dropping in a Live Linux and running off that though I don't think that it will be the problem it's worth checking out.

    If you don't have a copy of a Live Linux available you should be able to get one from a Newsagent as a Cover Disc on any Linux Mag or you can download or buy one from here for a few cents or free.

    http://tinyurl.com/23nmq

    It's just possible that the CPU is breaking down as it's doing the work of a CPU & GPU at the same time so it's working harder than a normal CPU does.

    Col