Questions

raid 1 implementation

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raid 1 implementation

computab
I need to implemet RAID 1 on an existing Windows XP system that has no raid. Where can I get software for this, please?
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    Langlier

    Get a hardware RAID controller off of newegg or the like.

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    Reb00t

    Depends on what he's going to keep on there. Why spend the money if you're only looking to RAID a desktop for a user who works on email and such?

    If this is for someone at an executive level, I would definitely recommend a hardware raid controller.

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    shardeth-15902278

    XP (Pro at least) can do software RAID. the first step you need to take is convert the disks to dynamic (One Caveat, you won't be able to boot other OS's on the drive after the conversion). Once that is done, simply r-click the orignal disk, slect add mirror, and follow the wizard.

    That being said. Hardware Raid is a little faster, and generally more reliable. And it should cost you less then $50 to get a Raid Card.

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    otsgdata

    xp x64 greyed out menu item. Going insane MS playing games?

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    sgt_shultz

    you can't do it without a hardware controller. it really is not built into xp like microsoft led us to believe. here is a snippet about it from mskb (searched Windows XP for 'raid 1')
    You cannot create mirrored volumes on computers that are running Windows XP Home Edition, Windows XP Professional or Windows XP 64-Bit Edition. However, you can use a computer that is running Windows XP Professional to create mirrored volumes on remote computers that are running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server. You must have administrative privileges on the remote computer to do this.

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    CG IT

    If the main board supports SATA RAID 0/1+ J0BD, or you choose an Adaptec SATA RAID controller card and you create a RAID 1 mirrored array on 2 SATA discs, you'll experience a performance hit that you or the user will probably not like. Not only that but with Mirrored arrays, the largest size array is the smallest size disc in the array. So if you get 2 ea 80 GB drives, the mirrored array will be 80 GB. get 1ea 80 GB and 1 ea 120 GB, the RAID array will be 80 GB.

    If you can find a mainboard that supports RAID 5 or a RAID controller card that supports RAID 5, then you get both the security of mirrored drives [via a parity bit] and the advantage of striped drives.

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    What motherboard/Northbridge/Southbridge do you have? Is the motherboard based on an Intel chipset?

    You can do RAID 0 (striped), RAID 1 (mirrored) or a combination of the two with only two drives using Intel Matrix RAID. It is consdidered software or 'Fake' RAID by the Linux folks and there is a small performance hit on the CPU. I am running an Intel Core 2 Duo 6400 and see no performance issues at all.

    Using RAID 0 in addition to RAID 1 will allow you to maximize your total storage space at the risk of losing whatever is on the RAID 0 volume. Don't use RAID 0 if you don't mind losing everything you have saved on it. I use RAID 0 to store my OS' and Apps. It is also great for editing large audio/video files.

    Intel Matrix Storage Technology is available on 'select' motherboards with the Intel ICH7R, ICH7M-DH or ICH8R, ICH8DH, ICH8DO, ICH9R Southbridge chipsets and the P35, 965, 975X, 955X, 945G ,945P, 945PM and 945GM Express Northbridge chipsets. Check the specs on your motherboard.

    As mentioned by others, there are hardware based RAID solutions out there for a price.

    It is best to have a matched pair of drives and if you want to go the Intel Matrix route, they have to be SATA drives.

  • +
    0 Votes
    Langlier

    Get a hardware RAID controller off of newegg or the like.

    +
    0 Votes
    Reb00t

    Depends on what he's going to keep on there. Why spend the money if you're only looking to RAID a desktop for a user who works on email and such?

    If this is for someone at an executive level, I would definitely recommend a hardware raid controller.

    +
    0 Votes
    shardeth-15902278

    XP (Pro at least) can do software RAID. the first step you need to take is convert the disks to dynamic (One Caveat, you won't be able to boot other OS's on the drive after the conversion). Once that is done, simply r-click the orignal disk, slect add mirror, and follow the wizard.

    That being said. Hardware Raid is a little faster, and generally more reliable. And it should cost you less then $50 to get a Raid Card.

    +
    0 Votes
    otsgdata

    xp x64 greyed out menu item. Going insane MS playing games?

    +
    0 Votes
    sgt_shultz

    you can't do it without a hardware controller. it really is not built into xp like microsoft led us to believe. here is a snippet about it from mskb (searched Windows XP for 'raid 1')
    You cannot create mirrored volumes on computers that are running Windows XP Home Edition, Windows XP Professional or Windows XP 64-Bit Edition. However, you can use a computer that is running Windows XP Professional to create mirrored volumes on remote computers that are running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, or Windows 2000 Datacenter Server. You must have administrative privileges on the remote computer to do this.

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    If the main board supports SATA RAID 0/1+ J0BD, or you choose an Adaptec SATA RAID controller card and you create a RAID 1 mirrored array on 2 SATA discs, you'll experience a performance hit that you or the user will probably not like. Not only that but with Mirrored arrays, the largest size array is the smallest size disc in the array. So if you get 2 ea 80 GB drives, the mirrored array will be 80 GB. get 1ea 80 GB and 1 ea 120 GB, the RAID array will be 80 GB.

    If you can find a mainboard that supports RAID 5 or a RAID controller card that supports RAID 5, then you get both the security of mirrored drives [via a parity bit] and the advantage of striped drives.

    +
    0 Votes

    What motherboard/Northbridge/Southbridge do you have? Is the motherboard based on an Intel chipset?

    You can do RAID 0 (striped), RAID 1 (mirrored) or a combination of the two with only two drives using Intel Matrix RAID. It is consdidered software or 'Fake' RAID by the Linux folks and there is a small performance hit on the CPU. I am running an Intel Core 2 Duo 6400 and see no performance issues at all.

    Using RAID 0 in addition to RAID 1 will allow you to maximize your total storage space at the risk of losing whatever is on the RAID 0 volume. Don't use RAID 0 if you don't mind losing everything you have saved on it. I use RAID 0 to store my OS' and Apps. It is also great for editing large audio/video files.

    Intel Matrix Storage Technology is available on 'select' motherboards with the Intel ICH7R, ICH7M-DH or ICH8R, ICH8DH, ICH8DO, ICH9R Southbridge chipsets and the P35, 965, 975X, 955X, 945G ,945P, 945PM and 945GM Express Northbridge chipsets. Check the specs on your motherboard.

    As mentioned by others, there are hardware based RAID solutions out there for a price.

    It is best to have a matched pair of drives and if you want to go the Intel Matrix route, they have to be SATA drives.