Questions

Replacing a Panasonic TV circuit board

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Replacing a Panasonic TV circuit board

casey.rand
Does anyone know how to replace the circuit board on a Panasonic flat screen TV? I have the part, I just need to know how to change it myself.

Thanks.
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    TheChas

    I find that getting the actual service manual is very helpful for this kind of task.

    A couple of things you might want to check before you start:

    Does the board just plug in? Or, do you need to make solder connections?

    If there are solder connections, do you have the correct tools and skills? Electronics soldering is different from other types of soldering.

    Does the board need to be programmed or set up to work with your TV?
    Do you have the tools and instructions to set up the board?

    Now, barring a service manual, you need to figure out what of the case to open up to get at the board.

    I myself would start by placing the TV screen down an a clean soft surface static mat. The bench and mat need to be big enough to support the entire frame of the set.

    Now, methodically look for screws and catches. Carefully remove the screws and release the catches. If you found them all, you should be able to carefully remove the back of the housing.

    Connect up your ESD wrist strap and remove the connectors on the circuit board.
    Remove the board.
    Install the new board.
    Plug in all of the connectors.

    Triple check everything.

    Replace the rear housing.

    Set the TV back up so you can see the screen, and see if it now works.

    I do suspect that there is some setup required to get an optimum picture.
    Sometimes it is just a special key sequence to access the setup menu.

    Chas

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    NickNielsen Moderator

    Panasonic, Sony, Teac, and many others do not usually allow anybody other than authorized technicians to purchase service manuals. The reason I was given was that it was a "liability issue."

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    0 Votes
    TheChas

    That must be a recent change.

    The last time I needed a service manual, I had no trouble ordering one.

    For many items, there are third party sources for manuals. Back in the day, TV techs saved money by buying Sams "Photofacts" manuals rather than the OEM manuals.

    Chas

  • +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    I find that getting the actual service manual is very helpful for this kind of task.

    A couple of things you might want to check before you start:

    Does the board just plug in? Or, do you need to make solder connections?

    If there are solder connections, do you have the correct tools and skills? Electronics soldering is different from other types of soldering.

    Does the board need to be programmed or set up to work with your TV?
    Do you have the tools and instructions to set up the board?

    Now, barring a service manual, you need to figure out what of the case to open up to get at the board.

    I myself would start by placing the TV screen down an a clean soft surface static mat. The bench and mat need to be big enough to support the entire frame of the set.

    Now, methodically look for screws and catches. Carefully remove the screws and release the catches. If you found them all, you should be able to carefully remove the back of the housing.

    Connect up your ESD wrist strap and remove the connectors on the circuit board.
    Remove the board.
    Install the new board.
    Plug in all of the connectors.

    Triple check everything.

    Replace the rear housing.

    Set the TV back up so you can see the screen, and see if it now works.

    I do suspect that there is some setup required to get an optimum picture.
    Sometimes it is just a special key sequence to access the setup menu.

    Chas

    +
    0 Votes
    NickNielsen Moderator

    Panasonic, Sony, Teac, and many others do not usually allow anybody other than authorized technicians to purchase service manuals. The reason I was given was that it was a "liability issue."

    +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    That must be a recent change.

    The last time I needed a service manual, I had no trouble ordering one.

    For many items, there are third party sources for manuals. Back in the day, TV techs saved money by buying Sams "Photofacts" manuals rather than the OEM manuals.

    Chas