Questions

Router can not connect to the internet because of Gateway

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Router can not connect to the internet because of Gateway

TheMaco
At the small business I am working I was recently hired, and along with being the shipping manager so to say, I am the IT Admin also, well the previous guy who setup the network left me with absolute no information, and now I have to reconfigure everything.

Here's how it goes everything from the Gateway if its a straight connection, from it the computers connect to the internet no problem, once I connect the the wireless router to the gateway, and connect all the computer, the router disables any internet connection. I disabled and enabled DHCP to no avail.

My router is a DIR-615 Wireless Router, and my gateway is a DI-604.

So it goes DSL Modem - DI-604 Gateway - DIR 615 Wireless Router.

If I connect computer straight to gateway its not a problem, but if I connect the gateway to the router, then computer to the router, I get an IP Address, connects to network but no internet.

In the logs of the DLINK Wireless router, I get this error " "The addressing of the Internet side learnt thru DHCP conflicts with the addressing selected for the LAN side. Internet communications will be disabled until you have changed the LAN side addressing to resolve the problem."

Thank you for any help.
  • +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    1.Turn off DHCP in the Wireless router.
    2.Set the router to get DHCP address from the DHCP server.
    3.in the DHCP server set the wireless routers WAN to static.
    4.Set the Wireless routers WAN to static, with the correct DNS information... and what ever else pertains to that connection.

    ... for starters....

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    0 Votes
    timwalsh

    Tk's answer is a start. You definitely have routing issues.

    NOTE: The below is based on the assumption that the only public IP address you are using is on the DSL modem.

    1. The real problem is too many routers in the mix. Most DSL modems also act as routers, which gives you three routers in line between the Internet and your internal network. This can only cause netwroking confucion unless there is a valid reason for this configuration.

    2. Get rid of the DI-604. It is no longer supported by D-Link. The 604 and 615 both perform the same functions except that the 615 gives you a wireless capability as well. Therefore, you won't need a replacement for the 604. If you have any firewall settings in the 604, make sure you transfer those settings to the 615.

    2. If you are running a Windows server, it should act as your DHCP server. Turn off DHCP on the DIR-615.

    3. If you are are not running a Windows server, turn on DHCP on your wireless router.

    4. Your DSL modem is probably getting it's Internet IP address automatically from your ISP. Configure a fixed Local IP address on the DSL modem. You can either turn on DHCP (if it's available) to automatically configure the WAN IP address on the DIR-615, or manually configure the WAN address on the DIR 615. I would recommend turning DHCP on if it's availalbe, as this makes it easier to directly connect a computer to the DSL modem for troubleshooting purposes. Do NOT plug any computers into the switch on the DSL modem if it has one.

    5. On the 615, you can either manually configure the WAN IP address, or set it to automatically get an IP address, depending on whether you enabled DHCP on the DSL modem. If you manually configure an address, it must be in the same subnet as the local IP address on the DSL modem.

    7. On the 615, manually configure the Local IP address. This MUST be a different subnet than the one used between the DSL modem and the 615 (i.e. if the subnet between the DSL modem and 615 is 192.168.1.x, the Local IP address be in a subnet that is anything other than 192.168.1.x).

    8. Turn on DHCP on the 615 if you aren't using a Windos server.

    Result: Computers will get an IP address from a DHCP server only on the subnet they are connected to (either the 615, or a Windows server). DHCP requests will not pass through the 615 to reach the DHCP server on the DSL modem because the DSL modemi is on a different subnet.

    Sorry for the long-winded response.

  • +
    0 Votes
    ---TK---

    1.Turn off DHCP in the Wireless router.
    2.Set the router to get DHCP address from the DHCP server.
    3.in the DHCP server set the wireless routers WAN to static.
    4.Set the Wireless routers WAN to static, with the correct DNS information... and what ever else pertains to that connection.

    ... for starters....

    +
    0 Votes
    timwalsh

    Tk's answer is a start. You definitely have routing issues.

    NOTE: The below is based on the assumption that the only public IP address you are using is on the DSL modem.

    1. The real problem is too many routers in the mix. Most DSL modems also act as routers, which gives you three routers in line between the Internet and your internal network. This can only cause netwroking confucion unless there is a valid reason for this configuration.

    2. Get rid of the DI-604. It is no longer supported by D-Link. The 604 and 615 both perform the same functions except that the 615 gives you a wireless capability as well. Therefore, you won't need a replacement for the 604. If you have any firewall settings in the 604, make sure you transfer those settings to the 615.

    2. If you are running a Windows server, it should act as your DHCP server. Turn off DHCP on the DIR-615.

    3. If you are are not running a Windows server, turn on DHCP on your wireless router.

    4. Your DSL modem is probably getting it's Internet IP address automatically from your ISP. Configure a fixed Local IP address on the DSL modem. You can either turn on DHCP (if it's available) to automatically configure the WAN IP address on the DIR-615, or manually configure the WAN address on the DIR 615. I would recommend turning DHCP on if it's availalbe, as this makes it easier to directly connect a computer to the DSL modem for troubleshooting purposes. Do NOT plug any computers into the switch on the DSL modem if it has one.

    5. On the 615, you can either manually configure the WAN IP address, or set it to automatically get an IP address, depending on whether you enabled DHCP on the DSL modem. If you manually configure an address, it must be in the same subnet as the local IP address on the DSL modem.

    7. On the 615, manually configure the Local IP address. This MUST be a different subnet than the one used between the DSL modem and the 615 (i.e. if the subnet between the DSL modem and 615 is 192.168.1.x, the Local IP address be in a subnet that is anything other than 192.168.1.x).

    8. Turn on DHCP on the 615 if you aren't using a Windos server.

    Result: Computers will get an IP address from a DHCP server only on the subnet they are connected to (either the 615, or a Windows server). DHCP requests will not pass through the 615 to reach the DHCP server on the DSL modem because the DSL modemi is on a different subnet.

    Sorry for the long-winded response.