Questions

Running multiple instances of Adobe Reader

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Running multiple instances of Adobe Reader

bill_weimer
I have a user that wants to open a new instance of Reader whenever he opens a PDF from within Windows Explorer (double-click the file). I have found that if I go through Start --> Run, that I can use "AcroRd32.exe /n", but I can not seem to get this to work within the file associations in Windows.

This is Acrobat Reader 7.0.9 on WinXP SP2 machine.

I would appreciate any guidance anyone can offer.
  • +
    0 Votes
    amanbedi

    in acrobat profession, you have option to go in edit, preferences, documents and select open document in new window..

    should be a similar one in reader.

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    0 Votes
    bill_weimer

    Thanks, but that is one of the first places we looked. Reader does not have that option, which is why you have to use the command line switch. What I am looking for is how to enable that switch on the command line in the File Associations.

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    0 Votes
    ashij

    EDIT

    Please ignore this.. mistake
    see next post for solution

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    0 Votes
    ashij

    Greetings,

    I am not sure if I'm late in replying or you have found the solution already.. but reading "file association" clicked something.

    if you want all adobe to open new window no matter what, then, do this:

    -Open Explorer, then
    -Tool --> Folder Options --> File Types
    look for PDF
    -Select PDF and then click on advanced
    -Under "Actions" select "open" and click on EDIT
    Under the entry: "Applications used to perform action:"
    you'll something like this -
    "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 5.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" "%1"

    Add /n right after :: .exe" ::
    so it looks like this:
    "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 5.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" /n "%1"

    Now when you double click any file to open it, it should open in a new window.

    in case you want to run multiple instances of Adobe from command line, then type: "acrobat /n"

    Hope I was right in deciphering your question and provided suitable answer!

    Ash

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    0 Votes
    bill_weimer

    We had tried that, but WinXP Pro SP2 does not hold that switch in the command line. We have even tried unchecking "Use DDE", but after hitting OK then going back in to view it, the switch is gone and the command line has reverted back to it's original state.

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    0 Votes
    ashij

    That's really wierd, I've tried that on XP Pro SP2 and Win2K machines. Works just fine even after restart

    If you followed the exact instructions, then I can't think what the problem might be.

    +
    0 Votes
    ashij

    Ok Bill, The last fix didn't work, so after much experimentation, I am ready to give out a workaround. This might be a long post, with lot of reading, brace yourself :)

    What & Why:
    - The "folder option->file type" method usually works. However this only controls how the program opens when you click on the shortcut. Which doesn't solve the problem of opening the file from "Start-> Run"

    - when you type acrobat in the Start -> Run command, it starts acrobat because there's an entry in the Registry (here: HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths\Acrobat.exe), which tells windows to start this program. However you cannot add switches like "/n, /t, /p" to this entry. So no option to start new window upon each execution.

    How to solve this issue:
    This is a dirty work-around.
    - Make a short cut (call it anything initially, acrobat.exe)
    - Point it to the acrobat.exe in program files) and add a /n switch infront of the path.
    - So now it should look like this:
    Target: "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" /n
    Start In: "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat"
    - Now rename this link to just "acrobat", place it in the %windir%\system32\ directory
    - No No, don't start using it yet.
    - Open Regedit and find the key pointing to your adobe executable. export this key and then delete the acrobat.exe entry from the registry.
    now close the Registry editor and type "acrobat" in start->run

    This should definitely work.

    NOTE
    - please edit the registry only if you feel comfortable with it, don't take my word if you are not familiar with how the registry works
    - I used Acrobat 7.0 Pro for test, the installation path/executable name might be different on your computer, but the logic is exactly same.
    - I also tested this successfully on a computer with Acrobat Reader 8.0

    Ash

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    0 Votes
    ashij

    Hey, bIll, just curious if this solution worked for you!!

    +
    0 Votes
    bill_weimer

    Still waiting to hear back from the user.

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    0 Votes
    instantrunoff

    This is an old thread, but I had the same issue with Adobe Acrobat 9.3.1 & Windows 7 x64:

    As previously said, you do add the /n switch for the open command here:
    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AcroExch.Document\shell\open\command

    However, you must also check HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AcroExch.Document\CurVer and see what's listed (e.g. AcroExch.Document.7)

    Then add the /n switch again for whatever the CurVer file type is, e.g.: HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AcroExch.Document.7\shell\Open\command

    It works properly, and the windows are even grouped in the Windows 7 taskbar. However, it is possible to have the same pdf open in multiple windows after this change.

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    0 Votes
    Ron K.

    I appreciate when someone resurrects the odd dead thread to provide a full solution.

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    0 Votes
    ven0m

    You can create a shortcut for Adobe Acrobat, and let say on your put it on your Desktop.
    You'll use it to open another instance of the reader. To create the shortcut with the property of opening multiple instances you have to edit it like this:

    1) Right-click on the shortcut > choose Properties.

    In the Shortcut tab of the window you'll have to modify the "Target" field - that is change the application target path by adding the "/n" parameter at the end:

    +
    0 Votes
    ven0m

    You can create a shortcut for Adobe Acrobat, and let say on your put it on your Desktop.
    You'll use it to open another instance of the reader. To create the shortcut with the property of opening multiple instances you have to edit it like this:

    1) Right-click on the shortcut > choose Properties(from the new menu that appears).

    In the Shortcut tab of the window you'll have to modify the "Target" field - that is change the application target path by adding the "/n" parameter at the end:

    (initially its target parameter will look something like this - depending on the location of the installed application - :
    "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" )


    2) "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" /n

    Now every time you click on the shortcut it will open a new instance of Adobe Acrobat Reader, then you can drag-and-drop you .pdf file on the new Acrobat Reader window to view its contents. (If you want to do it faster, just drag-and-drop the .pdf file on the Desktop icon for Acrobat ).

  • +
    0 Votes
    amanbedi

    in acrobat profession, you have option to go in edit, preferences, documents and select open document in new window..

    should be a similar one in reader.

    +
    0 Votes
    bill_weimer

    Thanks, but that is one of the first places we looked. Reader does not have that option, which is why you have to use the command line switch. What I am looking for is how to enable that switch on the command line in the File Associations.

    +
    0 Votes
    ashij

    EDIT

    Please ignore this.. mistake
    see next post for solution

    +
    0 Votes
    ashij

    Greetings,

    I am not sure if I'm late in replying or you have found the solution already.. but reading "file association" clicked something.

    if you want all adobe to open new window no matter what, then, do this:

    -Open Explorer, then
    -Tool --> Folder Options --> File Types
    look for PDF
    -Select PDF and then click on advanced
    -Under "Actions" select "open" and click on EDIT
    Under the entry: "Applications used to perform action:"
    you'll something like this -
    "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 5.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" "%1"

    Add /n right after :: .exe" ::
    so it looks like this:
    "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 5.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" /n "%1"

    Now when you double click any file to open it, it should open in a new window.

    in case you want to run multiple instances of Adobe from command line, then type: "acrobat /n"

    Hope I was right in deciphering your question and provided suitable answer!

    Ash

    +
    0 Votes
    bill_weimer

    We had tried that, but WinXP Pro SP2 does not hold that switch in the command line. We have even tried unchecking "Use DDE", but after hitting OK then going back in to view it, the switch is gone and the command line has reverted back to it's original state.

    +
    0 Votes
    ashij

    That's really wierd, I've tried that on XP Pro SP2 and Win2K machines. Works just fine even after restart

    If you followed the exact instructions, then I can't think what the problem might be.

    +
    0 Votes
    ashij

    Ok Bill, The last fix didn't work, so after much experimentation, I am ready to give out a workaround. This might be a long post, with lot of reading, brace yourself :)

    What & Why:
    - The "folder option->file type" method usually works. However this only controls how the program opens when you click on the shortcut. Which doesn't solve the problem of opening the file from "Start-> Run"

    - when you type acrobat in the Start -> Run command, it starts acrobat because there's an entry in the Registry (here: HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths\Acrobat.exe), which tells windows to start this program. However you cannot add switches like "/n, /t, /p" to this entry. So no option to start new window upon each execution.

    How to solve this issue:
    This is a dirty work-around.
    - Make a short cut (call it anything initially, acrobat.exe)
    - Point it to the acrobat.exe in program files) and add a /n switch infront of the path.
    - So now it should look like this:
    Target: "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" /n
    Start In: "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat"
    - Now rename this link to just "acrobat", place it in the %windir%\system32\ directory
    - No No, don't start using it yet.
    - Open Regedit and find the key pointing to your adobe executable. export this key and then delete the acrobat.exe entry from the registry.
    now close the Registry editor and type "acrobat" in start->run

    This should definitely work.

    NOTE
    - please edit the registry only if you feel comfortable with it, don't take my word if you are not familiar with how the registry works
    - I used Acrobat 7.0 Pro for test, the installation path/executable name might be different on your computer, but the logic is exactly same.
    - I also tested this successfully on a computer with Acrobat Reader 8.0

    Ash

    +
    0 Votes
    ashij

    Hey, bIll, just curious if this solution worked for you!!

    +
    0 Votes
    bill_weimer

    Still waiting to hear back from the user.

    +
    0 Votes
    instantrunoff

    This is an old thread, but I had the same issue with Adobe Acrobat 9.3.1 & Windows 7 x64:

    As previously said, you do add the /n switch for the open command here:
    HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AcroExch.Document\shell\open\command

    However, you must also check HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AcroExch.Document\CurVer and see what's listed (e.g. AcroExch.Document.7)

    Then add the /n switch again for whatever the CurVer file type is, e.g.: HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AcroExch.Document.7\shell\Open\command

    It works properly, and the windows are even grouped in the Windows 7 taskbar. However, it is possible to have the same pdf open in multiple windows after this change.

    +
    0 Votes
    Ron K.

    I appreciate when someone resurrects the odd dead thread to provide a full solution.

    +
    0 Votes
    ven0m

    You can create a shortcut for Adobe Acrobat, and let say on your put it on your Desktop.
    You'll use it to open another instance of the reader. To create the shortcut with the property of opening multiple instances you have to edit it like this:

    1) Right-click on the shortcut > choose Properties.

    In the Shortcut tab of the window you'll have to modify the "Target" field - that is change the application target path by adding the "/n" parameter at the end:

    +
    0 Votes
    ven0m

    You can create a shortcut for Adobe Acrobat, and let say on your put it on your Desktop.
    You'll use it to open another instance of the reader. To create the shortcut with the property of opening multiple instances you have to edit it like this:

    1) Right-click on the shortcut > choose Properties(from the new menu that appears).

    In the Shortcut tab of the window you'll have to modify the "Target" field - that is change the application target path by adding the "/n" parameter at the end:

    (initially its target parameter will look something like this - depending on the location of the installed application - :
    "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" )


    2) "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 7.0\Acrobat\Acrobat.exe" /n

    Now every time you click on the shortcut it will open a new instance of Adobe Acrobat Reader, then you can drag-and-drop you .pdf file on the new Acrobat Reader window to view its contents. (If you want to do it faster, just drag-and-drop the .pdf file on the Desktop icon for Acrobat ).