Questions

Setting Up Sever 2008 for DHCP on a network that already has a router

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Setting Up Sever 2008 for DHCP on a network that already has a router

bludawg
I guess Im little confused,and I apologize if this question is a little easy for all you pros out there,but here it goes,Im currently working at a large office,we just built a server because they haven't had one in place yet and its long over do,Im currently getting internet from a cable isp that has given me a static address,the router in place is currently configured for this isp connection,I want to add the server to the equation for active directory and dhcp,when I set dhcp up on the server do I have to disable it on the router? and if I do that does my server need two network cards one for incoming internet from the isp and the second outgoing to hand out dhcp and internet of the rest of the network workstations and devices,I guess im confused,can I keep the existing router set up and still have an accessible Active directory server?
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    1 Votes
    robo_dev

    First of all the 'static' IP address is the external address of the router, the one facing the Internet. This is outside the firewall and has no relationship at all to the addresses inside your network.

    Typically the firewal/router that connects you to the Internet also has a DHCP server on it's internal interface, the one that serves up connectivity on the local network.

    IF you plan to use the new server as your DHCP server, then you need to assign a static IP address to the router (so you can manage it), and then disable it's DHCP server. (the DHCP service on the router).

    Assuming that the firewall/router is, in fact, a firewall/router, then your server is no different than any other LAN device. Give it one NIC, or two, or as many as you like. Assign it a static IP address. Note that its default gateway is the IP address of the firewall/router.

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    bludawg

    Thank you this is all a little confusing I covered all this in my first year of college but its been a long time since Ive had to put it in practical application. So if I want people to be able to remote into the server and also use the AD functionality do I have to install the dhcp roll? Or can I continue to let the router serve the workstations dhcp ,do I even need the dhcp roll?

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    robo_dev

    Well, yes and no.

    You cannot do AD remotely, nor would you want to, security wise. Some VPN services give you the ability to remotely use Windows resources, but that's a whole different subject.

    With respect to the internal network:

    If you are using AD, that is, you have a Windows Domain, it's best to use the DHCP functionality in the Windows server, and disable it in the router. The answer can be more complicated than this, since there are issues with WINS, DNS, etc. But as long as the Windows server is reliable and on all the time, it works fine as your main DHCP server.

    If you are just running a Windows workgroup, use the DHCP server in the router.

  • +
    1 Votes
    robo_dev

    First of all the 'static' IP address is the external address of the router, the one facing the Internet. This is outside the firewall and has no relationship at all to the addresses inside your network.

    Typically the firewal/router that connects you to the Internet also has a DHCP server on it's internal interface, the one that serves up connectivity on the local network.

    IF you plan to use the new server as your DHCP server, then you need to assign a static IP address to the router (so you can manage it), and then disable it's DHCP server. (the DHCP service on the router).

    Assuming that the firewall/router is, in fact, a firewall/router, then your server is no different than any other LAN device. Give it one NIC, or two, or as many as you like. Assign it a static IP address. Note that its default gateway is the IP address of the firewall/router.

    +
    0 Votes
    bludawg

    Thank you this is all a little confusing I covered all this in my first year of college but its been a long time since Ive had to put it in practical application. So if I want people to be able to remote into the server and also use the AD functionality do I have to install the dhcp roll? Or can I continue to let the router serve the workstations dhcp ,do I even need the dhcp roll?

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Well, yes and no.

    You cannot do AD remotely, nor would you want to, security wise. Some VPN services give you the ability to remotely use Windows resources, but that's a whole different subject.

    With respect to the internal network:

    If you are using AD, that is, you have a Windows Domain, it's best to use the DHCP functionality in the Windows server, and disable it in the router. The answer can be more complicated than this, since there are issues with WINS, DNS, etc. But as long as the Windows server is reliable and on all the time, it works fine as your main DHCP server.

    If you are just running a Windows workgroup, use the DHCP server in the router.