Questions

Simple AV question

+
0 Votes
Locked

Simple AV question

jardinier
The most reliable computer I have ever owned is an IBM running Windows ME. It has not given a hiccup in 10 years.

But the better known AV programs will not run on ME and so I am using ClamWin.

It is rather basic and does not, like the more sophisticated AVs, catch nasties in mid-air before they can enter the computer, so scanning has to be done manually.

The settings include the options of quarantining a virus or deleting the infected file.

Is it OK to leave the infected files in quarantine (it has found a trojan) or should they be deleted totally?
  • +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    A lot depends on what the infected file is.

    If it is a file from your browser cache or a file you know you have a reliable backup of, delete it with no misgivings.

    If it is a file that has value to you, you may want to quarantine it and then try and remove the infection.

    If it is a required file for Windows or to run a program, I normally delete them and deal with the issue. If I need to reinstall an application, I will.

    I would also recommend that you run the newest AV software you have that will run on your Me system. That along with a firewall will provide some protection between scans with ClamWin.

    Chas

    +
    0 Votes
    sojrner

    Normally, you would wipe out the HDD after backing up files. That is the most secure way to get rid of a virus on the old Operating Systems. Also, you can check www.downloads.com to see if there is any free software AV for the ME system. It will be really hard to find tho.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I use avast on all my other computers. Alas there has been a major program upgrade and it will no longer work on ME.

    I looked at a number of free AVs that will run on ME, and ClamWin seemed to be as good as any.

    +
    0 Votes
    boxfiddler Moderator

    but in past I've been able to get older versions of Avast. I have a Win2K machine that I keep it on. Hmmmm. I'll look a little closer.

    Five pages of older versions:
    http://www.filehorse.com/download-avast-antivirus/185/old-versions/page-1/

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    that having a slightly outdated <i>resident</i> AV would be a good addition to an up-to-date AV that offers no real-time resident scanning.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    But is it OK to have two AVs on one machine? Will they clash? Actually this is something I have wondered about for some time.

    +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    True, you only want to have 1 real time AV program running at one time. But, ClamWin does not run real time so you can have a second AV running with ClamWin.

    My primary point was that even if you run an out of date AV that is not getting definition updates on your Me system, that is still better than no real-time protection.

    While you will not be protected from the newest threats, older software will still block all those old viruses that are still infection systems.

    Chas

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    Hi Chas. I installed avast 4.8 which was about 31 MB. The update was another 35 MB. It took the computer 5 minutes to boot up. So I uninstalled avast and it boots up in 1 minute.

    One advantage of my ME computer is that it correctly runs Sidekick 2.0, my diary and notes program, which appears at boot-up. This program which was designed for Windows 3.1 will not run at all on some XP computers, but crashes the computer, and on the XP computers which will open it, it will not load automatically at boot-up.

    So I have been forgetting to pay my bills and so forth. The ME computer can just handle AOL lite on Firefox, so I can switch it on each day, check my emails, and see what appointments I have or which bills are due.

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    You may have a better boot time and performance if you turn off some of the features that you really don't need.

    Then again, with 128 MB of RAM... Although I used to do OK with 192 MB.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    It's too big, period. Who needs 5 minutes boot time when I can do it in 1 minute? Additionally ClamWin actually did an automatic update.

    Meanwhile I continue to explore the possibilities of ME -- songs, movies, etc. etc.

    Windows Media Player version 7 works just fine.

    Yes, having lots of fun. :)

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    I, too, am a fan of "old" technology. I never had ME, but I have used versions of DOS, Win 95/98, and some Linux distros long after they were officially dead.

    And if I get off my duff and find a serial mouse, I could fire up my 486. And a 386. Unfortunately, someone killed my 8086.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I no longer have a computer with an OS earlier than ME, but it will handle anything designed for 95, 98, and possibly MS-DOS. In fact I have already installed two programs which appear to be running in DOS.

    It would have been nice if there was an option of installing DOS software in XP. As you would no doubt know, a lot of creativity went into producing software for DOS.

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    I have had some success running some DOS applications in emulators like DOSbox, but a lot depends more on the high speed of modern processors and RAM, more so, it seems, than the installed OS.

    Sure I do wish I could run some really old apps like Harvard Graphics on a modern system. That would be fun to play with.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I have just successfully installed a number of DOS games in Windows ME. Mostly they work satisfactorily.

    What a shame there is no DOS facility in XP?

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    the DOS emulators like DOSBox work rather well. They were mostly created for just that purpose - supporting games.

    It would be fairly difficult to have a real mode DOS function with a running NT kernel, so I don't expect DOS apps to work with an OS like XP. The even bigger problem is that DOS is fairly incompatible with modern hardware (especially the older versions of DOS and DOS apps). I wouldn't be surprised if anything older than DOS 7 or 6 would even work at all on modern machines.

    I wonder how well virtualization products support old OSes like DOS. I haven't tried this method yet, but I'm sure it would be a bit limited.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I have never heard of these so I have downloaded and installed Dosbox. I haven't yet figured out how to make it work but it will keep me entertained for a while.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    which is for all Windows platforms. But the update is a huge 35 MB so I would have to watch a movie while it is downloading on dial-up.

    As I have mentioned in another post, it took the computer 5 minutes to boot-up with all this avast stuff. So I uninstalled avast and it boots up in one minute.

    As I have also mentioned elsewhere, Firefox 2 can just manage to load my AOL email lite version. So I can check my appointments and emails on this computer and go back to my fast computer for general purposes.

    The ME will just run an external DVD drive using the two USB ports available for power and data.

    With the faster boot up time, I can now install various Windows 95 software of which I have an extensive collection.

    I am very pleased to be still able to use this computer which hasn't made so much as a hiccup in 10 years. The only thing I have done is increase the RAM from 64 to 128 so that it will just run the internet and just run the external DVD drive.

    [Edited to update info after further experimentation]

  • +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    A lot depends on what the infected file is.

    If it is a file from your browser cache or a file you know you have a reliable backup of, delete it with no misgivings.

    If it is a file that has value to you, you may want to quarantine it and then try and remove the infection.

    If it is a required file for Windows or to run a program, I normally delete them and deal with the issue. If I need to reinstall an application, I will.

    I would also recommend that you run the newest AV software you have that will run on your Me system. That along with a firewall will provide some protection between scans with ClamWin.

    Chas

    +
    0 Votes
    sojrner

    Normally, you would wipe out the HDD after backing up files. That is the most secure way to get rid of a virus on the old Operating Systems. Also, you can check www.downloads.com to see if there is any free software AV for the ME system. It will be really hard to find tho.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I use avast on all my other computers. Alas there has been a major program upgrade and it will no longer work on ME.

    I looked at a number of free AVs that will run on ME, and ClamWin seemed to be as good as any.

    +
    0 Votes
    boxfiddler Moderator

    but in past I've been able to get older versions of Avast. I have a Win2K machine that I keep it on. Hmmmm. I'll look a little closer.

    Five pages of older versions:
    http://www.filehorse.com/download-avast-antivirus/185/old-versions/page-1/

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    that having a slightly outdated <i>resident</i> AV would be a good addition to an up-to-date AV that offers no real-time resident scanning.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    But is it OK to have two AVs on one machine? Will they clash? Actually this is something I have wondered about for some time.

    +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    True, you only want to have 1 real time AV program running at one time. But, ClamWin does not run real time so you can have a second AV running with ClamWin.

    My primary point was that even if you run an out of date AV that is not getting definition updates on your Me system, that is still better than no real-time protection.

    While you will not be protected from the newest threats, older software will still block all those old viruses that are still infection systems.

    Chas

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    Hi Chas. I installed avast 4.8 which was about 31 MB. The update was another 35 MB. It took the computer 5 minutes to boot up. So I uninstalled avast and it boots up in 1 minute.

    One advantage of my ME computer is that it correctly runs Sidekick 2.0, my diary and notes program, which appears at boot-up. This program which was designed for Windows 3.1 will not run at all on some XP computers, but crashes the computer, and on the XP computers which will open it, it will not load automatically at boot-up.

    So I have been forgetting to pay my bills and so forth. The ME computer can just handle AOL lite on Firefox, so I can switch it on each day, check my emails, and see what appointments I have or which bills are due.

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    You may have a better boot time and performance if you turn off some of the features that you really don't need.

    Then again, with 128 MB of RAM... Although I used to do OK with 192 MB.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    It's too big, period. Who needs 5 minutes boot time when I can do it in 1 minute? Additionally ClamWin actually did an automatic update.

    Meanwhile I continue to explore the possibilities of ME -- songs, movies, etc. etc.

    Windows Media Player version 7 works just fine.

    Yes, having lots of fun. :)

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    I, too, am a fan of "old" technology. I never had ME, but I have used versions of DOS, Win 95/98, and some Linux distros long after they were officially dead.

    And if I get off my duff and find a serial mouse, I could fire up my 486. And a 386. Unfortunately, someone killed my 8086.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I no longer have a computer with an OS earlier than ME, but it will handle anything designed for 95, 98, and possibly MS-DOS. In fact I have already installed two programs which appear to be running in DOS.

    It would have been nice if there was an option of installing DOS software in XP. As you would no doubt know, a lot of creativity went into producing software for DOS.

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    I have had some success running some DOS applications in emulators like DOSbox, but a lot depends more on the high speed of modern processors and RAM, more so, it seems, than the installed OS.

    Sure I do wish I could run some really old apps like Harvard Graphics on a modern system. That would be fun to play with.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I have just successfully installed a number of DOS games in Windows ME. Mostly they work satisfactorily.

    What a shame there is no DOS facility in XP?

    +
    0 Votes
    seanferd

    the DOS emulators like DOSBox work rather well. They were mostly created for just that purpose - supporting games.

    It would be fairly difficult to have a real mode DOS function with a running NT kernel, so I don't expect DOS apps to work with an OS like XP. The even bigger problem is that DOS is fairly incompatible with modern hardware (especially the older versions of DOS and DOS apps). I wouldn't be surprised if anything older than DOS 7 or 6 would even work at all on modern machines.

    I wonder how well virtualization products support old OSes like DOS. I haven't tried this method yet, but I'm sure it would be a bit limited.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    I have never heard of these so I have downloaded and installed Dosbox. I haven't yet figured out how to make it work but it will keep me entertained for a while.

    +
    0 Votes
    jardinier

    which is for all Windows platforms. But the update is a huge 35 MB so I would have to watch a movie while it is downloading on dial-up.

    As I have mentioned in another post, it took the computer 5 minutes to boot-up with all this avast stuff. So I uninstalled avast and it boots up in one minute.

    As I have also mentioned elsewhere, Firefox 2 can just manage to load my AOL email lite version. So I can check my appointments and emails on this computer and go back to my fast computer for general purposes.

    The ME will just run an external DVD drive using the two USB ports available for power and data.

    With the faster boot up time, I can now install various Windows 95 software of which I have an extensive collection.

    I am very pleased to be still able to use this computer which hasn't made so much as a hiccup in 10 years. The only thing I have done is increase the RAM from 64 to 128 so that it will just run the internet and just run the external DVD drive.

    [Edited to update info after further experimentation]