Questions

single NIC, want to excess two different network simultaneously ?

Tags:
+
1 Votes
Locked

single NIC, want to excess two different network simultaneously ?

supysum
I have two network with ip details
NETWORK1 # ip 192.168.1.111 subnet 255.0.0.0 gateway 192.168.1.1 DNS SERVER 218.248.255.194 & 208.67.222.222
NETWORK2 # ip 10.130.96.56 SUBNET 255.255.255.240 GATEWAY 10.130.96.1 DNS SERVER 10.203.208.1 10.203.208.2

AND I WANT TO ACCESS THESE TWO NETWORK ON A SINGLE NIC HAVING WINDOWS XP. I TRIED THIS BY PROCESS TCP/IP ->ADVANCE SETTING -> ADD IP SETTING -> DNS

BUT BY THIS PROCESS I AM ABLE TO ACCESS ONLY ONE NETWORK AT A TIME.
BY CHANGING METRIC VALUE 1 OF NETWORK1 & 2 OF NETWORK2 I AM ABLE TO CONNECT WITH NETWORK1 AND BY INTERCHANGING METRIC VALUES I AM ABLE TO ACCESS NETWORK2.
NOW I AM CONFUSED HOW TO RESOLVE THIS PROBLEM SO THAT I CAN ACCESS BOTH THE NETWORK SIMULTANEOUSLY.
HELP ME OUT FRIENDS
  • +
    0 Votes
    cmiller5400

    STOP SHOUTING! Writing all in CAPS is considered shouting if you didn't know...

    My question to you is how are the networks connected? What is the infrastructure? Do you have routers? Layer 3 switches? Need more information besides "changing metrics"

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Windows client operating systems, such as XP, do not support routing natively, and therefore Windows will only use the default gateway for outbound (and inbound) traffic.

    When you change router metrics you are simply changing the default gateway, as Windows has a feature called dead-gateway-detection that looks for the gateway that is faster and connects to it (based on router metric setting).

    You can have a secondary network connection, and as long as it is on the same subnet it can be used, but if your two networks are different subnets, not so much.

    And also, 'disjoint networks' do not work. (Disjoint networks have the same address range but are not connected to each other)
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/159168

    The only way Windows could have simultaneous use of both logical interfaces would be if it were configured to work as a router, since the device would have to maintain a routing table to sort out which packets to send where.

    It is possible to create a static route to the secondary network if needed, but it still will default to one default gateway.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/157025

  • +
    0 Votes
    cmiller5400

    STOP SHOUTING! Writing all in CAPS is considered shouting if you didn't know...

    My question to you is how are the networks connected? What is the infrastructure? Do you have routers? Layer 3 switches? Need more information besides "changing metrics"

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Windows client operating systems, such as XP, do not support routing natively, and therefore Windows will only use the default gateway for outbound (and inbound) traffic.

    When you change router metrics you are simply changing the default gateway, as Windows has a feature called dead-gateway-detection that looks for the gateway that is faster and connects to it (based on router metric setting).

    You can have a secondary network connection, and as long as it is on the same subnet it can be used, but if your two networks are different subnets, not so much.

    And also, 'disjoint networks' do not work. (Disjoint networks have the same address range but are not connected to each other)
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/159168

    The only way Windows could have simultaneous use of both logical interfaces would be if it were configured to work as a router, since the device would have to maintain a routing table to sort out which packets to send where.

    It is possible to create a static route to the secondary network if needed, but it still will default to one default gateway.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/157025