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tbillz
Thanks for the help
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    Kiltie

    XP checks for partitions and any previously installed Operating Systems.

    It's a fair way down the installation, but it should see what you have.

    It'll also allow you to repartition, I strongly suggest separating out another partition at this stage. It depends of how much disk space you have as to what you can spare, but the extra partition will come in really useful later on.

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    Kiltie

    If you are reinstalling XP, did you want an additional OS to the existing?

    Could be a problem with License there, unless you have multiples?

    The best way is to install a different OS before installing XP, and use sensible partition strategy. XP will take care of all the multi boot configuration automatically.

    As an example, on this particular machine I am using, I partition a 13GB drive into 1GB for a swap/page file space, two 4 GB partitions for Operating Systems, and rest as data/backup. (advantage for a separate swap partition is no file fragmentation)

    Some may think it too small, but it isn't so in practice, as I also have a secondary drive and a home network with 120+GB available for me.

    So I first build a 98SE system on one partition, then XP on the other main one, XP is clever enough to spot any existing installation and create the BOOT.INI needed to multi boot.

    If I have a Linux as well, as I do on other systems, I use GRUB boot loader to handle the multiple boot.

    If you are replacing the existing XP system, make sure you have backed up your personal data first but I would suggest planning well ahead.

    If merely repairing the XP, keeping the old one intact, DO NOT choose the very first repair option that XPs setup process suggests, but select one later, when XP spots the existing partitions and Operating Systems.

    Type R (for repair) there and you will get a hot reinstall without damaging any existing data or programs.

    (Been a while since I did this last, as I usually recreate from fresh, but I think the R option is not listed at that stage, however you can still enter it.)

    I also use FAT32 throughout my computer systems, as it is faster than NTFS and doesn't have the restrictions it does.

    Having a dual boot system has a terrific advantage, you can use one of the operating systems to make repairs on the other, should it get (say) infected with malware. You can still use your computer, data isn't usually affected.

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    3xp3rt

    When you boot from XP CD the first thing after booting is the identifying the partition or partitions. If you don?t make any change to existing partitions, just install the XP, all existing data will remaining.

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    0 Votes
    rob mekel

    XP install will automatically "see" all partitions you have.

    If you can work with all depends on the type of format you have given it. As long as it are the XP-format types you will have no problem.

    Rob

  • +
    0 Votes
    Kiltie

    XP checks for partitions and any previously installed Operating Systems.

    It's a fair way down the installation, but it should see what you have.

    It'll also allow you to repartition, I strongly suggest separating out another partition at this stage. It depends of how much disk space you have as to what you can spare, but the extra partition will come in really useful later on.

    +
    0 Votes
    Kiltie

    If you are reinstalling XP, did you want an additional OS to the existing?

    Could be a problem with License there, unless you have multiples?

    The best way is to install a different OS before installing XP, and use sensible partition strategy. XP will take care of all the multi boot configuration automatically.

    As an example, on this particular machine I am using, I partition a 13GB drive into 1GB for a swap/page file space, two 4 GB partitions for Operating Systems, and rest as data/backup. (advantage for a separate swap partition is no file fragmentation)

    Some may think it too small, but it isn't so in practice, as I also have a secondary drive and a home network with 120+GB available for me.

    So I first build a 98SE system on one partition, then XP on the other main one, XP is clever enough to spot any existing installation and create the BOOT.INI needed to multi boot.

    If I have a Linux as well, as I do on other systems, I use GRUB boot loader to handle the multiple boot.

    If you are replacing the existing XP system, make sure you have backed up your personal data first but I would suggest planning well ahead.

    If merely repairing the XP, keeping the old one intact, DO NOT choose the very first repair option that XPs setup process suggests, but select one later, when XP spots the existing partitions and Operating Systems.

    Type R (for repair) there and you will get a hot reinstall without damaging any existing data or programs.

    (Been a while since I did this last, as I usually recreate from fresh, but I think the R option is not listed at that stage, however you can still enter it.)

    I also use FAT32 throughout my computer systems, as it is faster than NTFS and doesn't have the restrictions it does.

    Having a dual boot system has a terrific advantage, you can use one of the operating systems to make repairs on the other, should it get (say) infected with malware. You can still use your computer, data isn't usually affected.

    +
    0 Votes
    3xp3rt

    When you boot from XP CD the first thing after booting is the identifying the partition or partitions. If you don?t make any change to existing partitions, just install the XP, all existing data will remaining.

    +
    0 Votes
    rob mekel

    XP install will automatically "see" all partitions you have.

    If you can work with all depends on the type of format you have given it. As long as it are the XP-format types you will have no problem.

    Rob