Questions

Unable to join Server to Domain

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Unable to join Server to Domain

grajek
I recently rebuilt a small office network. The network had a 2 DCs, DNS, Web Server, DB Server and Exchange Server. All on windows 2003.

I rebuilt the primary DC (I know no more PDC... It is the DC with all 5 FSMO roles) and demoted the backup DC. I was able to add all the machines back to the domain except the demoted DC box (server 2) When I try to join server 2 to the domain it says "The network location cannot be reached." I can ping the all of the machines on the network and can see the internet, using the box to ask this question. I have tried everything short of rebuilding the server.

If anyone can point me in the right direction I would be forever in their debt. I have checked all the services and made sure I have all the correct protocols configured. This box is configured the same as my other 2 windows 2003 servers (which I was able to join to the network). The Computer browser service is on and the server uses the correct DNS, the internal DC/DNS (same as the other servers.)

Any Ideas At All?

Thanks
Grajek
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    CG IT

    demoting the DC to a member server still leaves the server a member of the domain so you don't need to rejoin it.

    unjoin the server by joining it to a workgroup, then rejoin it.

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    grajek

    That was the first thing I tried. I joined it to a work group, rebooted, tried to join to the new domain but get the error "The network could not be contacted."

    I can ping the new network from the old DC and I can ping the old DC from all the other boxes on the new domain.

    Thanks.
    Grajek

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    0 Votes
    CG IT

    your inital question are about rebuilding a DC, demoting another DC, then having a problem joining a demoted DC [now considered a member server ]to the domain when it already belongs to a domain.

    The network could not be contacted message typically indicates a DC problem which inherently indicates a DNS problem if physical connectivity isn't the problem.

    here'a link to MS help and support articles dealing with network could not be contacted message....

    http://support.microsoft.com/search/default.aspx?query=The+network+could+not+be+contacted&catalog=LCID%3D1033&pd=&spid=3198&mode=r&lsc=0

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    grajek

    If there was a DC or DNS problem wouldn't the other member servers also have trouble connecting and seeing the network? I have searched and Technet and have gone through every workaround that comes close to, and many that didn't come close to, the problem I am having.

    Thanks for your time.

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    NaughtyMonkey

    If the demoted DC is still running DNS and looking to itself, it may not have the correct info.

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    douglasemc

    Reinstall TCP/IP-Related Services1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
    2. In Control Panel, double-click Network and Dial-up Connections.
    3. Right-click Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    4. Click to select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) check box, and then click OK.

    Note: After you select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) check box, the Client for Microsoft Networks and the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks check boxes should be automatically selected. If these check boxes are not selected, click to select them now.
    5. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components.
    6. In the Windows Component Wizard, click Networking Services and then click Details.
    7. In the Networking Services dialog box, select the services you noted in step 4 in the "Remove TCP/IP-Related Services" section of this article.
    8. Click OK, and then click Next.

    Note: If you are prompted for the Windows 2000 Server CD-ROM, insert the CD-ROM in the disc drive, and then click OK. You may also receive a prompt to configure TCP/IP settings to support WINS. Configure your TCP/IP settings based on the information you noted in step 12 of the earlier "Remove TCP/IP-Related Services" section, and then click OK.
    9. Click Finish, and then click Close.
    10. Click Close.
    11. Shut down your computer, and then restart Windows in normal mode.
    12. Change the startup type of the Net Logon service to Automatic. To do so: a. Right-click My Computer, and then click Manage.
    b. Expand Services and Applications.
    c. In the right pane, click Services, and then double-click Net Logon service.
    d. In the list of options for the startup type, click Automatic.

    13. After the reinstallation of the network components, the Net Logon service has a dependency of LanmanWorkstation. You must also add a dependency for LanmanServer. To do this: a. Start Registry Editor. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Netlogon
    b. In the right pane, double-click the DependOnServicesubkey. Only LanmanWorkstation should appear in the Value data list.
    c. On the line below LanmanWorkstation, type LanmanServer, and then click OK.

    14. Quit Registry Editor, and then restart the computer.
    15. Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe), and then locate and then modify the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters
    Make sure that your computer name or domain name is the value for the following registry subkeys, and if needed, add these items:
    Hostname REG_SZ: computer name
    Domain REG_SZ: fully qualified domain name
    NV Hostname REG_SZ: computer name
    NV Domain REG_SZ: fully qualified domain name
    Note After you rebuild TCP/IP, these four subkeys are blank. To note that the computer does not have an entry under either Full Computer Name or Domain, click My Computer, click Properties, and then click Network Identification.

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    0 Votes
    grajek

    Thanks, that got me farther than anything else but crapped out when it tried to join. I repaired the Windows 2003 Server installation. (NOT through the console)

    Once It repaired and rebooted I was able to join the network and all the services and application, like ISS and Exchange Server, worked like a champ.

    Thanks for your help.

    +
    0 Votes
    grajek

    I repaired the Windows 2003 Server installation. (NOT through the console)

    Once It repaired and rebooted I was able to join the network and all the services and application, like ISS and Exchange Server, worked like a champ.

    Thanks for all the help.

  • +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    demoting the DC to a member server still leaves the server a member of the domain so you don't need to rejoin it.

    unjoin the server by joining it to a workgroup, then rejoin it.

    +
    0 Votes
    grajek

    That was the first thing I tried. I joined it to a work group, rebooted, tried to join to the new domain but get the error "The network could not be contacted."

    I can ping the new network from the old DC and I can ping the old DC from all the other boxes on the new domain.

    Thanks.
    Grajek

    +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    your inital question are about rebuilding a DC, demoting another DC, then having a problem joining a demoted DC [now considered a member server ]to the domain when it already belongs to a domain.

    The network could not be contacted message typically indicates a DC problem which inherently indicates a DNS problem if physical connectivity isn't the problem.

    here'a link to MS help and support articles dealing with network could not be contacted message....

    http://support.microsoft.com/search/default.aspx?query=The+network+could+not+be+contacted&catalog=LCID%3D1033&pd=&spid=3198&mode=r&lsc=0

    +
    0 Votes
    grajek

    If there was a DC or DNS problem wouldn't the other member servers also have trouble connecting and seeing the network? I have searched and Technet and have gone through every workaround that comes close to, and many that didn't come close to, the problem I am having.

    Thanks for your time.

    +
    0 Votes
    NaughtyMonkey

    If the demoted DC is still running DNS and looking to itself, it may not have the correct info.

    +
    0 Votes
    douglasemc

    Reinstall TCP/IP-Related Services1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
    2. In Control Panel, double-click Network and Dial-up Connections.
    3. Right-click Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    4. Click to select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) check box, and then click OK.

    Note: After you select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) check box, the Client for Microsoft Networks and the File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks check boxes should be automatically selected. If these check boxes are not selected, click to select them now.
    5. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components.
    6. In the Windows Component Wizard, click Networking Services and then click Details.
    7. In the Networking Services dialog box, select the services you noted in step 4 in the "Remove TCP/IP-Related Services" section of this article.
    8. Click OK, and then click Next.

    Note: If you are prompted for the Windows 2000 Server CD-ROM, insert the CD-ROM in the disc drive, and then click OK. You may also receive a prompt to configure TCP/IP settings to support WINS. Configure your TCP/IP settings based on the information you noted in step 12 of the earlier "Remove TCP/IP-Related Services" section, and then click OK.
    9. Click Finish, and then click Close.
    10. Click Close.
    11. Shut down your computer, and then restart Windows in normal mode.
    12. Change the startup type of the Net Logon service to Automatic. To do so: a. Right-click My Computer, and then click Manage.
    b. Expand Services and Applications.
    c. In the right pane, click Services, and then double-click Net Logon service.
    d. In the list of options for the startup type, click Automatic.

    13. After the reinstallation of the network components, the Net Logon service has a dependency of LanmanWorkstation. You must also add a dependency for LanmanServer. To do this: a. Start Registry Editor. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Netlogon
    b. In the right pane, double-click the DependOnServicesubkey. Only LanmanWorkstation should appear in the Value data list.
    c. On the line below LanmanWorkstation, type LanmanServer, and then click OK.

    14. Quit Registry Editor, and then restart the computer.
    15. Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe), and then locate and then modify the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters
    Make sure that your computer name or domain name is the value for the following registry subkeys, and if needed, add these items:
    Hostname REG_SZ: computer name
    Domain REG_SZ: fully qualified domain name
    NV Hostname REG_SZ: computer name
    NV Domain REG_SZ: fully qualified domain name
    Note After you rebuild TCP/IP, these four subkeys are blank. To note that the computer does not have an entry under either Full Computer Name or Domain, click My Computer, click Properties, and then click Network Identification.

    +
    0 Votes
    grajek

    Thanks, that got me farther than anything else but crapped out when it tried to join. I repaired the Windows 2003 Server installation. (NOT through the console)

    Once It repaired and rebooted I was able to join the network and all the services and application, like ISS and Exchange Server, worked like a champ.

    Thanks for your help.

    +
    0 Votes
    grajek

    I repaired the Windows 2003 Server installation. (NOT through the console)

    Once It repaired and rebooted I was able to join the network and all the services and application, like ISS and Exchange Server, worked like a champ.

    Thanks for all the help.