Questions

UPGRADE WINDOWS 98 TO XP WITH CD

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0 Votes
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UPGRADE WINDOWS 98 TO XP WITH CD

BMORELAND526
CAN SOMEONEL PLEASE TELL ME THERE IS A WAY TO UPGRADE WINDOWS 98 TO XP WITH A CD
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    OldER Mycroft

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/316941

    How to prepare to upgrade Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition to Windows XP

    To upgrade to Windows XP, follow these steps:
    1. Start your computer, and then insert the Windows XP CD into the CD or DVD drive.
    2. If Windows automatically detects the CD, click Install Windows to start the Windows XP Setup Wizard.

    If Windows does not automatically detect the CD, click Start. Then click Run. Type the following command, and then click OK:
    CD drive letter:\setup.exe
    3. When you are prompted to select an installation type, select Upgrade (the default setting), and then click Next.
    4. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the upgrade.

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    Cd?

    BMORELAND526

    What cd is needed to install?? How much does it cost?

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    OldER Mycroft

    I reckon your best bet would be to have a look for it on Ebay, or Amazon, or any other online sales outlet.

    Given the length of time since 'upgrade' discs have been the norm, you are more likely to find standard Windows XP installation discs, rather than discs to upgrade from Windows 98.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Windows-Home-Upgrade-VERSION/dp/B00005MOTE

    Clearly I cannot give you a definitive price for this disc, because the cost is only valid for the individual sale between you and the company you purchase from. Prices will rise and fall and rise again depending on availability and quality of goods.

    To check for yourself, type win xp, amazon or win xp, ebay into Google, or any search engine of your preference. :)

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    derek

    I don't understand why the knee jerk response is that XP is not commercially available. Not onyl is it easier to get an XP laptop from Dell, Sony or HP now than is was a year ago. . there is so many retail and oem copies in the channel that we won't run out for a while.

    Perpetuating the erroneous belief that it is hard to get Xp only hurts the people that don't want Vista.

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    OldER Mycroft

    Before you go shooting off from the hip, maybe you should have READ the entire text, rather than reacting to the title of my post!

    "I reckon your best bet would be to have a look for it on Ebay, or Amazon, or any other online sales outlet.

    Given the length of time since 'upgrade' discs have been the norm, you are more likely to find standard Windows XP installation discs, rather than discs to upgrade from Windows 98.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Windows-Home-Upgrade-VERSION/dp/B00005MOTE

    Clearly I cannot give you a definitive price for this disc, because the cost is only valid for the individual sale between you and the company you purchase from. Prices will rise and fall and rise again depending on availability and quality of goods.

    To check for yourself, type win xp, amazon or win xp, ebay into Google, or any search engine of your preference. :)"


    Now, please, correct me if I am still wrong, but WHERE EXACTLY in my post did I mislead anyone or show any knee jerk response, eh??? :)

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    0 Votes
    ThumbsUp2

    ... but out here, you can no longer purchase the shrink-wrapped retail version through normal retail outlets as a stand-alone product (without a computer). In fact, I have personally been told by the PTB's in several major retail stores (Fry's, Circuit City, Wal-Mart, etc...) as well as our normal vendor at work that they all had to sign an agreement stating they would no longer stock XP after June 30th, 2008 if they stock Vista on their shelves.

    You might want to take a gander at this. It explains MS's announcement.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-xp/future.aspx

    Now, that doesn't mean there aren't still retail copies laying around on shelves of small Mom & Pop stores here and there. And, those could all be perfectly legitimate. Go ahead, find them!

    Sure, you can buy a new computer with XP pre-loaded as a 'downgrade'. Try getting the XP restore CD! And, that's not the RETAIL version.

    Sure, you can still get an OEM copy of XP when you purchase a MB, processor or even a HDD. But, that's not the RETAIL version.

    Sure, you can find people willing to sell you what they call a legitimate copy of XP Retail on eBay, etc... and take your chances that what you get is (1) legitimate and (2) has an accompanying COA which hasn't been used somewhere else (i.e. Will it activate and authenticate?).

    We're not perpetuating a belief. It's the cold hard truth, not only here, but around the world. People who want to just purchase a single copy of WinXP Retail (no hardware, no new computer) are nearly S.O.L.! If they want it bad enough, are willing to search a long time to find it AND pay premium price for it when they do find it because it's getting hard to get, they'll probably find one, for a while yet.

    .

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    0 Votes
    dmiles

    Step-by-Step: Upgrading Windows 9x/Me to Windows XP
    Upgrading Windows 9x/Me to Windows XP is a straightforward process. In the following example, a heavily used Windows 98 system is upgraded to Windows XP Professional, but the steps are identical for any 9x-based OS.

    1. Insert the Windows XP CD-ROM
    When you insert the Windows XP CD-ROM, you will be confronted by the front-end application shown here. Select Install Windows XP to continue.


    2. Close all applications
    If Setup detects any applications running that will hinder the installation of XP, you'll see this warning now. Anti-virus utilities and other system-level applications are the most obvious problems.


    3. Choose an installation type
    When the Setup wizard begins, it will prompt you to choose between an upgrade and a clean install. An upgrade will take your existing operating system and upgrade it to Windows XP, and this is the option we will select here. You can choose clean install if you'd like to overwrite the existing OS or install XP in a dual-boot situation.


    4. License agreement and product key
    Next, you'll have to agree to Microsoft's complex licensing agreement. Among the highlights: You don't actually own Windows XP and you can only install it on one PC. In the next step, you enter your product key, which is found on an orange sticker attached to the XP CD's jewel case.


    5. Upgrade report
    This step duplicates the functionality of the Upgrade Advisor, which we discuss in part two of the XP Installation and Upgrade Super Guide. You should make note of any software or hardware issues that are found during this step.


    6. Get updated Setup files
    If you're connected to the Internet, Setup will next ask you whether it can update itself over the Internet using the new Dynamic Updates technology. I strongly recommend you do this, as Microsoft will be updating XP Setup with new critical updates and driver additions over time, and this will ensure that your copy of XP is as up-to-date as possible when first installed.


    7. Updating Setup
    At this point, Setup is updated and some boot files are copied to the PC. Setup will then automatically reboot the computer. If you see a message about pressing any key to boot from the CD-ROM at this point, do not do so: Your PC has been configured to boot Setup off the hard drive.


    8. Preparing Setup
    In this phase of Setup, more files are copied to your computer in preparation for installation. Then, it will reboot again. As before, be sure to not hit any key if your PC prompts you to do so to boot off the CD-ROM.


    9. Installing Windows
    In this Setup phase, Windows XP installs devices and the network, then copies and configures the other files needed to install XP. The Start Menu items are installed, and then components are registered.


    10. Finalizing installation
    In the final phase of Setup, program and system settings are upgraded, settings are saved, and, finally, temporary files are removed. Then the system reboots again.

    11. Welcome to Microsoft Windows
    The first time that XP boots, you are presented with the Out of Box Experience (OOBE), which lets you connect to the Internet, activate Windows, and optionally register Windows. When this is complete, you are presented with your XP desktop.

    Post-upgrade tasks
    Once Windows XP is installed, it's time to perform a few post-installation tasks:

    1. Test installed software. Check to see that your software programs all work as before. If any do not, attempt to reinstall them using the original setup disks, or check the Web sites for the specific applications to see whether there are any updates. If any are still not working, open up Help and Support and navigate to the Fixing a problem link under Pick a Help Topic. There, you will find help about solving application and software problems.

    2. Test installed hardware. Make sure all of your hardware works. Open up Device Manager (Open the Start menu, right-click My Computer, choose Properties, then go to the Hardware Tab and click Device Manager) and make sure all of your hardware was detected and has working drivers. If any do not--as evidenced by a yellow bang next to the hardware device's name, right-click and choose Update Driver. This will launch the Hardware Update Wizard. The first time around, ensure the XP CD-ROM is still in the drive, and try the option titled Install the software automatically (Recommended). If this doesn't work, visit the hardware maker's site and see if there is an updated XP-compatible driver. If this fails, open up Help and Support and navigate to the Fixing a problem link under Pick a Help Topic. There, you will find further help about solving hardware and system device problems.

    3. Run Windows Update to make sure your system is up-to-date. Starting October 25, 2001, there will be many, many updates for Windows XP on this site, so you should visit Windows Update right away. You may need to reboot after certain updates, and some updates will require you to install them individually. Keep installing and rebooting until you've got them all.

    4. Defrag your system drive. During an upgrade, your system drive is going to become heavily fragmented. To defragment this drive, open My Computer, right-click the drive (typically C:) and choose Properties. Navigate to the Tools tab and select Defragment Now.

    5. Customize the system further. At this point, you might want to configure the wallpaper, screensaver, and other features, especially if these features weren't carried over from your previous Windows version for some reason. Windows XP configuration occurs in a number of places, but some hot-spots include:

    Display Properties - Right-click an empty area of the background and choose Properties.

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    Jacky Howe

    I would backup all of my data and wipe the Drive. Start the setup with the XP CD and insert the Win98 CD when it is asked for. Nothing quite like a fresh start. You won't be bringing along the garbage from the old install.
    <br><br>
    Perform a clean install of Windows XP and delete the Primary Partition and recreate the Primary Partition on the fly.
    <br><br>
    Use this method to wipe the drive and recreate the Partition.
    <br><br>
    1. Start your computer from the Windows XP CD. To do this, insert the Windows XP CD into your CD drive or DVD drive, and then restart your computer.
    <br><br>
    2. When you see the "Press any key to boot from CD" message, press any key to start the computer from the Windows XP CD.
    <br><br>
    3. At the Welcome to Setup screen, press ENTER to start Windows XP Setup.
    <br><br>
    4. Read the Microsoft Software License Terms, and then press F8.
    <br><br>
    5. Follow the instructions on the screen to select and format a partition where you want to install Windows XP. At this stage you can select to delete the Primary Partition and recreate it. Then continue with the install.
    <br><br>
    6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete Windows XP Setup.
    <br><br>
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/316941/en-us
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome.
    </i>

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    0 Votes

    Cd

    BMORELAND526

    Ok So I need a windows Xp cd?? How much does it cost?

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    0 Votes
    ThumbsUp2

    I believe the upgrade version was $99 US and the full version was $199 US. However, neither has been available in stores for nearly 2 years. You'll have to shop around for a used one, so there's no telling how much they'll soak you for it. Just be sure to get the COA (Certificate of Authenticity) along with any CD you buy, or you'll be out the money for something you won't be able to use.

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    Jacky Howe

    depend on where you can get it. It looks as though the prices have risen over here.
    <br>
    http://www.bettercomputers.com.au/diy-htpc-parts-software-c-101_81.html
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome.
    </i>

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    0 Votes
    1bn0

    If you are not running adequate hardware, you will just be wasting your time.

    Also, Jacky is correct. Backup your data first and then let the XP install wipe the drive and install a clean system.

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    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/316941

    How to prepare to upgrade Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition to Windows XP

    To upgrade to Windows XP, follow these steps:
    1. Start your computer, and then insert the Windows XP CD into the CD or DVD drive.
    2. If Windows automatically detects the CD, click Install Windows to start the Windows XP Setup Wizard.

    If Windows does not automatically detect the CD, click Start. Then click Run. Type the following command, and then click OK:
    CD drive letter:\setup.exe
    3. When you are prompted to select an installation type, select Upgrade (the default setting), and then click Next.
    4. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the upgrade.

    +
    0 Votes

    Cd?

    BMORELAND526

    What cd is needed to install?? How much does it cost?

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    I reckon your best bet would be to have a look for it on Ebay, or Amazon, or any other online sales outlet.

    Given the length of time since 'upgrade' discs have been the norm, you are more likely to find standard Windows XP installation discs, rather than discs to upgrade from Windows 98.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Windows-Home-Upgrade-VERSION/dp/B00005MOTE

    Clearly I cannot give you a definitive price for this disc, because the cost is only valid for the individual sale between you and the company you purchase from. Prices will rise and fall and rise again depending on availability and quality of goods.

    To check for yourself, type win xp, amazon or win xp, ebay into Google, or any search engine of your preference. :)

    +
    0 Votes
    derek

    I don't understand why the knee jerk response is that XP is not commercially available. Not onyl is it easier to get an XP laptop from Dell, Sony or HP now than is was a year ago. . there is so many retail and oem copies in the channel that we won't run out for a while.

    Perpetuating the erroneous belief that it is hard to get Xp only hurts the people that don't want Vista.

    +
    0 Votes
    OldER Mycroft

    Before you go shooting off from the hip, maybe you should have READ the entire text, rather than reacting to the title of my post!

    "I reckon your best bet would be to have a look for it on Ebay, or Amazon, or any other online sales outlet.

    Given the length of time since 'upgrade' discs have been the norm, you are more likely to find standard Windows XP installation discs, rather than discs to upgrade from Windows 98.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Windows-Home-Upgrade-VERSION/dp/B00005MOTE

    Clearly I cannot give you a definitive price for this disc, because the cost is only valid for the individual sale between you and the company you purchase from. Prices will rise and fall and rise again depending on availability and quality of goods.

    To check for yourself, type win xp, amazon or win xp, ebay into Google, or any search engine of your preference. :)"


    Now, please, correct me if I am still wrong, but WHERE EXACTLY in my post did I mislead anyone or show any knee jerk response, eh??? :)

    +
    0 Votes
    ThumbsUp2

    ... but out here, you can no longer purchase the shrink-wrapped retail version through normal retail outlets as a stand-alone product (without a computer). In fact, I have personally been told by the PTB's in several major retail stores (Fry's, Circuit City, Wal-Mart, etc...) as well as our normal vendor at work that they all had to sign an agreement stating they would no longer stock XP after June 30th, 2008 if they stock Vista on their shelves.

    You might want to take a gander at this. It explains MS's announcement.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-xp/future.aspx

    Now, that doesn't mean there aren't still retail copies laying around on shelves of small Mom & Pop stores here and there. And, those could all be perfectly legitimate. Go ahead, find them!

    Sure, you can buy a new computer with XP pre-loaded as a 'downgrade'. Try getting the XP restore CD! And, that's not the RETAIL version.

    Sure, you can still get an OEM copy of XP when you purchase a MB, processor or even a HDD. But, that's not the RETAIL version.

    Sure, you can find people willing to sell you what they call a legitimate copy of XP Retail on eBay, etc... and take your chances that what you get is (1) legitimate and (2) has an accompanying COA which hasn't been used somewhere else (i.e. Will it activate and authenticate?).

    We're not perpetuating a belief. It's the cold hard truth, not only here, but around the world. People who want to just purchase a single copy of WinXP Retail (no hardware, no new computer) are nearly S.O.L.! If they want it bad enough, are willing to search a long time to find it AND pay premium price for it when they do find it because it's getting hard to get, they'll probably find one, for a while yet.

    .

    +
    0 Votes
    dmiles

    Step-by-Step: Upgrading Windows 9x/Me to Windows XP
    Upgrading Windows 9x/Me to Windows XP is a straightforward process. In the following example, a heavily used Windows 98 system is upgraded to Windows XP Professional, but the steps are identical for any 9x-based OS.

    1. Insert the Windows XP CD-ROM
    When you insert the Windows XP CD-ROM, you will be confronted by the front-end application shown here. Select Install Windows XP to continue.


    2. Close all applications
    If Setup detects any applications running that will hinder the installation of XP, you'll see this warning now. Anti-virus utilities and other system-level applications are the most obvious problems.


    3. Choose an installation type
    When the Setup wizard begins, it will prompt you to choose between an upgrade and a clean install. An upgrade will take your existing operating system and upgrade it to Windows XP, and this is the option we will select here. You can choose clean install if you'd like to overwrite the existing OS or install XP in a dual-boot situation.


    4. License agreement and product key
    Next, you'll have to agree to Microsoft's complex licensing agreement. Among the highlights: You don't actually own Windows XP and you can only install it on one PC. In the next step, you enter your product key, which is found on an orange sticker attached to the XP CD's jewel case.


    5. Upgrade report
    This step duplicates the functionality of the Upgrade Advisor, which we discuss in part two of the XP Installation and Upgrade Super Guide. You should make note of any software or hardware issues that are found during this step.


    6. Get updated Setup files
    If you're connected to the Internet, Setup will next ask you whether it can update itself over the Internet using the new Dynamic Updates technology. I strongly recommend you do this, as Microsoft will be updating XP Setup with new critical updates and driver additions over time, and this will ensure that your copy of XP is as up-to-date as possible when first installed.


    7. Updating Setup
    At this point, Setup is updated and some boot files are copied to the PC. Setup will then automatically reboot the computer. If you see a message about pressing any key to boot from the CD-ROM at this point, do not do so: Your PC has been configured to boot Setup off the hard drive.


    8. Preparing Setup
    In this phase of Setup, more files are copied to your computer in preparation for installation. Then, it will reboot again. As before, be sure to not hit any key if your PC prompts you to do so to boot off the CD-ROM.


    9. Installing Windows
    In this Setup phase, Windows XP installs devices and the network, then copies and configures the other files needed to install XP. The Start Menu items are installed, and then components are registered.


    10. Finalizing installation
    In the final phase of Setup, program and system settings are upgraded, settings are saved, and, finally, temporary files are removed. Then the system reboots again.

    11. Welcome to Microsoft Windows
    The first time that XP boots, you are presented with the Out of Box Experience (OOBE), which lets you connect to the Internet, activate Windows, and optionally register Windows. When this is complete, you are presented with your XP desktop.

    Post-upgrade tasks
    Once Windows XP is installed, it's time to perform a few post-installation tasks:

    1. Test installed software. Check to see that your software programs all work as before. If any do not, attempt to reinstall them using the original setup disks, or check the Web sites for the specific applications to see whether there are any updates. If any are still not working, open up Help and Support and navigate to the Fixing a problem link under Pick a Help Topic. There, you will find help about solving application and software problems.

    2. Test installed hardware. Make sure all of your hardware works. Open up Device Manager (Open the Start menu, right-click My Computer, choose Properties, then go to the Hardware Tab and click Device Manager) and make sure all of your hardware was detected and has working drivers. If any do not--as evidenced by a yellow bang next to the hardware device's name, right-click and choose Update Driver. This will launch the Hardware Update Wizard. The first time around, ensure the XP CD-ROM is still in the drive, and try the option titled Install the software automatically (Recommended). If this doesn't work, visit the hardware maker's site and see if there is an updated XP-compatible driver. If this fails, open up Help and Support and navigate to the Fixing a problem link under Pick a Help Topic. There, you will find further help about solving hardware and system device problems.

    3. Run Windows Update to make sure your system is up-to-date. Starting October 25, 2001, there will be many, many updates for Windows XP on this site, so you should visit Windows Update right away. You may need to reboot after certain updates, and some updates will require you to install them individually. Keep installing and rebooting until you've got them all.

    4. Defrag your system drive. During an upgrade, your system drive is going to become heavily fragmented. To defragment this drive, open My Computer, right-click the drive (typically C:) and choose Properties. Navigate to the Tools tab and select Defragment Now.

    5. Customize the system further. At this point, you might want to configure the wallpaper, screensaver, and other features, especially if these features weren't carried over from your previous Windows version for some reason. Windows XP configuration occurs in a number of places, but some hot-spots include:

    Display Properties - Right-click an empty area of the background and choose Properties.

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    I would backup all of my data and wipe the Drive. Start the setup with the XP CD and insert the Win98 CD when it is asked for. Nothing quite like a fresh start. You won't be bringing along the garbage from the old install.
    <br><br>
    Perform a clean install of Windows XP and delete the Primary Partition and recreate the Primary Partition on the fly.
    <br><br>
    Use this method to wipe the drive and recreate the Partition.
    <br><br>
    1. Start your computer from the Windows XP CD. To do this, insert the Windows XP CD into your CD drive or DVD drive, and then restart your computer.
    <br><br>
    2. When you see the "Press any key to boot from CD" message, press any key to start the computer from the Windows XP CD.
    <br><br>
    3. At the Welcome to Setup screen, press ENTER to start Windows XP Setup.
    <br><br>
    4. Read the Microsoft Software License Terms, and then press F8.
    <br><br>
    5. Follow the instructions on the screen to select and format a partition where you want to install Windows XP. At this stage you can select to delete the Primary Partition and recreate it. Then continue with the install.
    <br><br>
    6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete Windows XP Setup.
    <br><br>
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/316941/en-us
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome.
    </i>

    +
    0 Votes

    Cd

    BMORELAND526

    Ok So I need a windows Xp cd?? How much does it cost?

    +
    0 Votes
    ThumbsUp2

    I believe the upgrade version was $99 US and the full version was $199 US. However, neither has been available in stores for nearly 2 years. You'll have to shop around for a used one, so there's no telling how much they'll soak you for it. Just be sure to get the COA (Certificate of Authenticity) along with any CD you buy, or you'll be out the money for something you won't be able to use.

    +
    0 Votes
    Jacky Howe

    depend on where you can get it. It looks as though the prices have risen over here.
    <br>
    http://www.bettercomputers.com.au/diy-htpc-parts-software-c-101_81.html
    <br><br>
    <i>Keep us informed as to your progress if you require further assistance.</i>
    <br><br>
    <i>If you think that any of the posts that have been made by all TR Members, have solved or contributed to solving the problem, please Mark them as <b>Helpful</b> so that others may benefit from the outcome.
    </i>

    +
    0 Votes
    1bn0

    If you are not running adequate hardware, you will just be wasting your time.

    Also, Jacky is correct. Backup your data first and then let the XP install wipe the drive and install a clean system.