Questions

Upgrading hard drive, should it be Seagate or Western Digital?

Tags:
+
3 Votes
Locked

Upgrading hard drive, should it be Seagate or Western Digital?

gary5646
I have an HP DV2000 and I am stuck in between the following two upgrades:

http://www.cpumedics.com/534129-001.html
http://www.cpumedics.com/575402-001.html

They are the same price, same specs just different brand. I don't know too much about hard drives, I just need an opinion of an experienced owner of either drive.
  • +
    0 Votes
    Mike R Lewis

    Over the years, I've bought four internal and three external Seagate drives. I then bought an external WD which was DOA.

    One problem I've noticed with all three external Seagates is that the USB port hole does not align well with the USB socket. In the worst case, wiggling the connector to get it in fried the USB circuit of the drive. The only way to retrieve the hard disk inside seemed to be with a chainsaw. Fortunately, I had multiple backups.

    To avoid frying more USB circuits, I now connect the USB cable then the power cable. If I'm feeling particularly paranoid, I unplug the USB cable from the computer before connecting it to the drive. I don't always do that as the USB sockets on computers wear out and fail over time.

    +
    3 Votes
    ComputerMaster

    I have a computer service business and I wouldn't buy Western Digital on a bet. I try to go with Seagate. Yeah, all companies have models or short time periods where there are problems. But WD seems to have more than their share. Maybe their high end drives do better. Maybe because the big-box toaster computers use the cheapest drives around they seem to use more WD and those drives seem to fail more. WD used to be the joke of the industry, although they've cleaned up their act a bit in the last few years. There for a while if a client brought in a computer with a failed drive I could almost bet it was a WD without looking.

    But I don't buy on warranties, either. I'd rather the drive just lasted like it was supposed to. I don't want to find out how good the warranty service is. Overall, in 30 or so years of building and servicing computers, and maintaining my own, Seagate does better. I try to get my clients to have backup drives, and make regular backups. Then in the rare case a Seagate takes a dive we just replace it, almost always well after a warranty period anyway. In the last five years I remember one 2.5" drive that failed a few months after install. I stayed away from the Seagate Terabyte drives when they first came out and so avoided that flaking problem that someone mentioned. Sometimes you just have to be smart, and Seagate to this point seems to take care of business the best.

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    I've just pulled my RMA's for this year.

    2 X Seagate NB Drives RMA'd when under 6 months old well the NB's that they where in where under 6 Months old and the drives failed.

    46 X WD's returned to the WD Agent here again all NB Drives in new NB's but all under 12 months or thereabouts old

    Granted the majority of NB's come with WD Drives and of the ones that I RMA'd most came from School Kids NB's so it's maybe not a fair comparison where as the 2 Seagate Drives came out of Adults Computers so they may have had an easier life and probably not placed on beds over bedclothes to block the Air Intakes and cook the HDD and M'Boards.

    But like everything else it's Personal Preference and which is better is from personal experience so other than starting Flame Wars it's probably better to say chose what you like.

    I'm a newcomer to Computer Servicing as I've only been doing it 22 years now.

    +
    2 Votes
    Elteto

    Reading the various responses here, one can see that there will always be multiple experiences and opinions. Personally, over the last many years, I have had the best experience with Hitachi and Samsung drives (both desktop and laptop drives).

    Last I heard, Hitachi was in the process of actually getting bought by Western Digital, who in turn is selling it to Toshiba (confusing, I know), but the "talent" and "technology" stayed with the Hitachi brand, so a Hitachi drive would also be a good investment.

    Samsung, on the other hand, now belongs to Seagate, but again, the talent and technology are still part of the Samsung brand.

    I agree with the comment above, no need to buy an HP-branded drive, just buy one that fits the machine you need it for.

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I've had better personal experience with samsung over hitachi. To be fair tho the hitachi failures were in 24/7 server environments versus samsung in client PC's. Hitachi's at the same spindle RPM as the samsung just seemed to run hot...

    +
    0 Votes
    info

    Hitachi drives are based on IBM's tech, and were pretty rock-solid. I wouldn't recommend a Samsung drive, although I wouldn't refuse one outright. Their quality (with everything) seems to be based on quantity. "You produce 7 bad per 100 units? We'll make 10,000 units, and noone will notice the bad ones!"

    Back when IDE was first getting established, the distributor I worked for brought in a boatload of drives made by a company called, 'Dai Yung'. We got a good chuckle, but we were right, almost ALL of them 'died young'.

    +
    0 Votes
    stano360

    In theory Hitatchi should be good, remember that their hard drive unit was purchased from IBM, which generally made a quality drive (when a 1Gb was a big drive!). But I've never found a good reason to use them, when for the same money or slightly more you can get Seagate or WD, both of which have held up well throughout the years for me. I've had few failures on any drives.

    +
    0 Votes
    Slayer_

    My desktop at home is running two seagates, one from 2003 and one from 2005, both show 98% fitness and performance and they work fine. I got a 10 gig Fujitsu still running perfectly, and those things ALWAYS died young. And I've lost 3 WD drives in 3 years. On the other hand, the seagate drives in our office are dropping like flies, but the WD drives so far, are fine, we have some 5 and 6 year old desktops that are not having any issues.

    Laptop drives always seem to die young.

    +
    0 Votes
    Elteto

    True, it depends on a number of factors; certain models, certain speeds, certain years may make a difference, as well as how the drive is being used; whether if it keeps getting powered on and off (desktop and mobile applications), or used in a server or as a continuous backup(always on)... There is just no specific brand that is miles ahead of the competition. That brand would drive everyone else out of business, as everyone would buy its products. But it is not happening, simply because none of the brands is excessively better than the others.

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I start counting on my fingers and toes... 25 years ago would make the date ~1987. Pheonix came out with their reverse engineered BIOS around 1984 which allowed third parties to build PC compatible systems. I know I was there :)

    Of course if you are like me and think that the Cosmac ELF was cool and built your first board using an RCA 1802 then you might be able to claim 30+ years of computer building experience...

    ADDENDUM: Almost forgot tearing apart a Big Track to get the TMS1100 processor. That was a 4 bit critter!

    P.S. The first hard drive I ever installed was on an Apple II+ circa 1986...

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Should I mention Hydraulic HDD's that leaked?

    But that was before computers as they where used in Main Frames and everyone knows that there where no computers before PC's. :^0

    Kids today are good for a laugh. I even had one ask me did I know that Paul McCarthy was in a band before he was in Wings. Took me a bit f time to realize she was talking about the Beatles and I never thought of them as Before Wings.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    Oh now Col we are talking building computers which implies PC ;).

    I didn't build, only cursed the early offspring of IBM, DEC and PRIME...

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I'll raise your "Hydraulic HDD" with some real hard drive history :)

    I pulled down my copy of "An Introduction to Direct Access Storage Devices, Hugh M. Sierra" to wit

    The first direct access storage device (RAMAC 350) was conceived and designed by IBM personnel in downtown San Jose, CA during the early 1950s. The feasibility models were a hodge-podge of components available at the time: the spindles were obtained from juke boxes, the disks were aluminum pizza plates with a hole in the middle, the magnetic recording materials (liquid) were poured on paperdrinking cups and deposited manually, the first read/write heads were assembled by former watchmakers, etc. In fact some of the early servomotors consisted of coils obtained from hi-fi loudspeakers whose cones had been removed. Today those motors are still called "voice" coil motors...

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Well then you'd remember those 1 Meg Winchester Drives used by Wang.

    I recently saw a array of those things about 50 used to hold the program for a CAM Device that was an Armature Winder. The owner wanted a couple of the drives which had failed replaced and I really had no idea how to proceed with that one. I ended up pulling an old Vesa IO Card and removing all of the old drives and fitting 1 X 100 Meg drive that was around before the IDE interface was standard. Now if only I could remember the name of those drives.

    I

    +
    0 Votes
    info

    VESA? That's 'new' tech! I had a young kid (well, I'm not that old myself) in from one of the tech schools on an internship. We were setting up some IBM PS/2 Model 25s when he pointed and asked, "What kind of plug is THAT?" I had to explain to him that 8-bit ISA slots even EXISTED, and that there were interfaces that were even OLDER. He seemed shocked. Ah, youth...

    +
    0 Votes
    stano360

    I was thankful that I got a HD in my first PC (versus two 5.25" floppy drives!). The classic Seagate ST225, that thing is probably still running somewhere! I felt like a king with that 20mb of space!

    +
    0 Votes
    Slayer_

    You guys are all so old... lol

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Slayer

    Wait a minute while I park my Walking Frame and I'll come and tell you about the Good Old Days when Computers where real and not the cheap light plastic that they are these days. Even then I came to Computers after Punch Cards where obsoleta, well I only worked on the then

    +
    0 Votes
    lehnerus2000

    My housemate always has problems with Seagate HDDs failing quickly.
    I haven't had a problem with either (I prefer WD because of my friend's experiences).

    Ironically, he bought me a Seagate 320 GB IDE HDD in 2007 and it hasn't "skipped a beat".

  • +
    0 Votes
    Mike R Lewis

    Over the years, I've bought four internal and three external Seagate drives. I then bought an external WD which was DOA.

    One problem I've noticed with all three external Seagates is that the USB port hole does not align well with the USB socket. In the worst case, wiggling the connector to get it in fried the USB circuit of the drive. The only way to retrieve the hard disk inside seemed to be with a chainsaw. Fortunately, I had multiple backups.

    To avoid frying more USB circuits, I now connect the USB cable then the power cable. If I'm feeling particularly paranoid, I unplug the USB cable from the computer before connecting it to the drive. I don't always do that as the USB sockets on computers wear out and fail over time.

    +
    3 Votes
    ComputerMaster

    I have a computer service business and I wouldn't buy Western Digital on a bet. I try to go with Seagate. Yeah, all companies have models or short time periods where there are problems. But WD seems to have more than their share. Maybe their high end drives do better. Maybe because the big-box toaster computers use the cheapest drives around they seem to use more WD and those drives seem to fail more. WD used to be the joke of the industry, although they've cleaned up their act a bit in the last few years. There for a while if a client brought in a computer with a failed drive I could almost bet it was a WD without looking.

    But I don't buy on warranties, either. I'd rather the drive just lasted like it was supposed to. I don't want to find out how good the warranty service is. Overall, in 30 or so years of building and servicing computers, and maintaining my own, Seagate does better. I try to get my clients to have backup drives, and make regular backups. Then in the rare case a Seagate takes a dive we just replace it, almost always well after a warranty period anyway. In the last five years I remember one 2.5" drive that failed a few months after install. I stayed away from the Seagate Terabyte drives when they first came out and so avoided that flaking problem that someone mentioned. Sometimes you just have to be smart, and Seagate to this point seems to take care of business the best.

    +
    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    I've just pulled my RMA's for this year.

    2 X Seagate NB Drives RMA'd when under 6 months old well the NB's that they where in where under 6 Months old and the drives failed.

    46 X WD's returned to the WD Agent here again all NB Drives in new NB's but all under 12 months or thereabouts old

    Granted the majority of NB's come with WD Drives and of the ones that I RMA'd most came from School Kids NB's so it's maybe not a fair comparison where as the 2 Seagate Drives came out of Adults Computers so they may have had an easier life and probably not placed on beds over bedclothes to block the Air Intakes and cook the HDD and M'Boards.

    But like everything else it's Personal Preference and which is better is from personal experience so other than starting Flame Wars it's probably better to say chose what you like.

    I'm a newcomer to Computer Servicing as I've only been doing it 22 years now.

    +
    2 Votes
    Elteto

    Reading the various responses here, one can see that there will always be multiple experiences and opinions. Personally, over the last many years, I have had the best experience with Hitachi and Samsung drives (both desktop and laptop drives).

    Last I heard, Hitachi was in the process of actually getting bought by Western Digital, who in turn is selling it to Toshiba (confusing, I know), but the "talent" and "technology" stayed with the Hitachi brand, so a Hitachi drive would also be a good investment.

    Samsung, on the other hand, now belongs to Seagate, but again, the talent and technology are still part of the Samsung brand.

    I agree with the comment above, no need to buy an HP-branded drive, just buy one that fits the machine you need it for.

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I've had better personal experience with samsung over hitachi. To be fair tho the hitachi failures were in 24/7 server environments versus samsung in client PC's. Hitachi's at the same spindle RPM as the samsung just seemed to run hot...

    +
    0 Votes
    info

    Hitachi drives are based on IBM's tech, and were pretty rock-solid. I wouldn't recommend a Samsung drive, although I wouldn't refuse one outright. Their quality (with everything) seems to be based on quantity. "You produce 7 bad per 100 units? We'll make 10,000 units, and noone will notice the bad ones!"

    Back when IDE was first getting established, the distributor I worked for brought in a boatload of drives made by a company called, 'Dai Yung'. We got a good chuckle, but we were right, almost ALL of them 'died young'.

    +
    0 Votes
    stano360

    In theory Hitatchi should be good, remember that their hard drive unit was purchased from IBM, which generally made a quality drive (when a 1Gb was a big drive!). But I've never found a good reason to use them, when for the same money or slightly more you can get Seagate or WD, both of which have held up well throughout the years for me. I've had few failures on any drives.

    +
    0 Votes
    Slayer_

    My desktop at home is running two seagates, one from 2003 and one from 2005, both show 98% fitness and performance and they work fine. I got a 10 gig Fujitsu still running perfectly, and those things ALWAYS died young. And I've lost 3 WD drives in 3 years. On the other hand, the seagate drives in our office are dropping like flies, but the WD drives so far, are fine, we have some 5 and 6 year old desktops that are not having any issues.

    Laptop drives always seem to die young.

    +
    0 Votes
    Elteto

    True, it depends on a number of factors; certain models, certain speeds, certain years may make a difference, as well as how the drive is being used; whether if it keeps getting powered on and off (desktop and mobile applications), or used in a server or as a continuous backup(always on)... There is just no specific brand that is miles ahead of the competition. That brand would drive everyone else out of business, as everyone would buy its products. But it is not happening, simply because none of the brands is excessively better than the others.

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I start counting on my fingers and toes... 25 years ago would make the date ~1987. Pheonix came out with their reverse engineered BIOS around 1984 which allowed third parties to build PC compatible systems. I know I was there :)

    Of course if you are like me and think that the Cosmac ELF was cool and built your first board using an RCA 1802 then you might be able to claim 30+ years of computer building experience...

    ADDENDUM: Almost forgot tearing apart a Big Track to get the TMS1100 processor. That was a 4 bit critter!

    P.S. The first hard drive I ever installed was on an Apple II+ circa 1986...

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Should I mention Hydraulic HDD's that leaked?

    But that was before computers as they where used in Main Frames and everyone knows that there where no computers before PC's. :^0

    Kids today are good for a laugh. I even had one ask me did I know that Paul McCarthy was in a band before he was in Wings. Took me a bit f time to realize she was talking about the Beatles and I never thought of them as Before Wings.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    Oh now Col we are talking building computers which implies PC ;).

    I didn't build, only cursed the early offspring of IBM, DEC and PRIME...

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I'll raise your "Hydraulic HDD" with some real hard drive history :)

    I pulled down my copy of "An Introduction to Direct Access Storage Devices, Hugh M. Sierra" to wit

    The first direct access storage device (RAMAC 350) was conceived and designed by IBM personnel in downtown San Jose, CA during the early 1950s. The feasibility models were a hodge-podge of components available at the time: the spindles were obtained from juke boxes, the disks were aluminum pizza plates with a hole in the middle, the magnetic recording materials (liquid) were poured on paperdrinking cups and deposited manually, the first read/write heads were assembled by former watchmakers, etc. In fact some of the early servomotors consisted of coils obtained from hi-fi loudspeakers whose cones had been removed. Today those motors are still called "voice" coil motors...

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Well then you'd remember those 1 Meg Winchester Drives used by Wang.

    I recently saw a array of those things about 50 used to hold the program for a CAM Device that was an Armature Winder. The owner wanted a couple of the drives which had failed replaced and I really had no idea how to proceed with that one. I ended up pulling an old Vesa IO Card and removing all of the old drives and fitting 1 X 100 Meg drive that was around before the IDE interface was standard. Now if only I could remember the name of those drives.

    I

    +
    0 Votes
    info

    VESA? That's 'new' tech! I had a young kid (well, I'm not that old myself) in from one of the tech schools on an internship. We were setting up some IBM PS/2 Model 25s when he pointed and asked, "What kind of plug is THAT?" I had to explain to him that 8-bit ISA slots even EXISTED, and that there were interfaces that were even OLDER. He seemed shocked. Ah, youth...

    +
    0 Votes
    stano360

    I was thankful that I got a HD in my first PC (versus two 5.25" floppy drives!). The classic Seagate ST225, that thing is probably still running somewhere! I felt like a king with that 20mb of space!

    +
    0 Votes
    Slayer_

    You guys are all so old... lol

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    Slayer

    Wait a minute while I park my Walking Frame and I'll come and tell you about the Good Old Days when Computers where real and not the cheap light plastic that they are these days. Even then I came to Computers after Punch Cards where obsoleta, well I only worked on the then

    +
    0 Votes
    lehnerus2000

    My housemate always has problems with Seagate HDDs failing quickly.
    I haven't had a problem with either (I prefer WD because of my friend's experiences).

    Ironically, he bought me a Seagate 320 GB IDE HDD in 2007 and it hasn't "skipped a beat".