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Upgrading hard drive, should it be Seagate or Western Digital?

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3 Votes
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Upgrading hard drive, should it be Seagate or Western Digital?

gary5646
I have an HP DV2000 and I am stuck in between the following two upgrades:

http://www.cpumedics.com/534129-001.html
http://www.cpumedics.com/575402-001.html

They are the same price, same specs just different brand. I don't know too much about hard drives, I just need an opinion of an experienced owner of either drive.
Clarifications Clarifications
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0 Votes
SmartAceW0LF
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My own experiences mirror yours in this regard. These days, I never pass on the opportunity to emphasize the need for backups to my clients. Especially when replacing a faulty drive with a new one. Seems to be a coin toss which is best on any given day.

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5 Votes
SmartAceW0LF
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is that you are purchasing these drives with the HP label on them. This "seems" to indicate that you are buying OEM drives. OEM drives from either of the 2 manufacturers carry an entirely different warranty. Generally, OEM drives must be replaced through the PC mfgrs warranty. Thus, the effective warranty is only as long as the PC is covered under warranty. It has been my experience that when purchasing replacement drives, its a good idea to steer clear of OEM drives and purchase them from a reseller otherwise.

My recommendation would be to purchase one of these 2
www.newegg*dot*com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148591
or
http://www.newegg.*dot*com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136856

Replace *dot* with .

Both of these drives are 7200 rpm drives which equates to significant performance improvement. While I havent used any of the hybrid drives made by seagate, they do get good reviews. Of the 2 listed, The seagate is 3 years warranty and the WD is 5 years warranty. Both are less in cost than the ones you posted and the reseller is second to none in my opinion with regards to price and standing behind the products they sell.

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0 Votes
Charles Bundy
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Second [SmartAceW0LF] on OEM. Of the two laptop drives presented it seems like western digital had 20% fewer negative comments pertaining to DOA or DW2W (Dead Within 2 Weeks). They do have a three year warranty versus seagate's two year, but if the drive doesn't die within six months, both units seem reliable.

Thus to have an edge with QA upfront I would go with Western Digital (for the two drives presented) from a third party vendor with specific warranty lengths.

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0 Votes
colecrew
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I have been building computers for over 20 years and have seen Seagate drives fail more often than Western Digital. On a normal day there are over 22 hard drives in use in my house, none of which are Seagate and the majority are over four years old. I personally have a couple of WDs that are over 10 years old and still spinning; while the Seagate drives are dead and gone.

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0 Votes
cerabus
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i also have been building systems for over 25 years. I agree,
WD has never been a problem. I have had one grive fail, 1 terabyte, got an rma that day and had a new drives within10 days. excellent customer service with WD. I have had some of my drives over 14 years and still use them, however so small they are for long term backups now.
I highly suggest WD drives. At my shop I have a stack of old seagates ... nuff said?

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0 Votes
dgilluly
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Seagate used to be a great company, but since they've gotten involved in Maxtor, they went downhill quickly. I recently purchased a Seagate portable hard drive, it lasted less than 6 months, and when it died it still had more than 2 years left on the warranty. They down right refused to take it for an RMA because SeaTools couldn't read it at all.

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0 Votes
robo_dev
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Maxtor is Latin for 'oops there goes all your data'.

My experience has been that WD is better than Seagate by a country mile.

Seagate had a HUGE issue a few years ago with the anti-wear coating on their drive platters flaking off and gumming up the drive heads. I personally worked on (attempted) data recovery on two of those drives and it did not go well.

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0 Votes
lkarnis
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I much prefer WD disks for 2 reasons.... 1. they seem to fail less often than Seagate disks and 2. WD's warranty support has been much better for me.

WD has a local warranty depot for me so I can drop off failed drives. With Seagate, I have to mail in drives (at my cost). The other aspect is the warranty of replacement drives. Last time I checked a replacement Seagate drive has a very limited warranty (even if the failed drive still had years left on its warranty) whereas WD's replacement drive warranty is closer to the warranty the original failed drive had.

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2 Votes
info
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I've been in 'the business' for awhile as well. I've seen enough to know that ALL makes can have their ups and downs. For these arguments, most people tend to buy either for price or personal preference rather than any 'real' qualitative evidence. MY personal preference is Western Digital (even though I've experienced a few failures), but if I have to buy a Seagate, I'm not overly bothered (They work well, and I've experienced more failures only because I happened to deal with more Seagate drives!). I've had good RMA and repair experiences with both.

As an aside, you don't 'need' to buy an HP-branded SATA notebook drive just because you have an HP notebook. Any SATA 2.5" drive will work. It's not going into a server, so arguments like, 'it has to have a special HP drive firmware' aren't valid. Check out prices, but do get a 7200rpm drive if you can for the performance...unless you REALLY need to squeeze all the battery life that you can out of it.

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0 Votes
Mike R Lewis
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Over the years, I've bought four internal and three external Seagate drives. I then bought an external WD which was DOA.

One problem I've noticed with all three external Seagates is that the USB port hole does not align well with the USB socket. In the worst case, wiggling the connector to get it in fried the USB circuit of the drive. The only way to retrieve the hard disk inside seemed to be with a chainsaw. Fortunately, I had multiple backups.

To avoid frying more USB circuits, I now connect the USB cable then the power cable. If I'm feeling particularly paranoid, I unplug the USB cable from the computer before connecting it to the drive. I don't always do that as the USB sockets on computers wear out and fail over time.