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What are the benefits of being CompTIA A+ certified?

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What are the benefits of being CompTIA A+ certified?

tony.thi512
Hey guys,

I would like to know what are the benefits of being CompTIA A+ certified and what type of positions can you get when becoming certified? Also what study material do you guys prefer? Thanks for the help
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    robo_dev

    A+ is a very basic certification which basically says you can do basic computer troubleshooting and maintenance. I hate to sound pessimistic, but I would not expect employers would be looking to hire someone strictly based on that cert.

    In terms of jobs, some sort of entry-level PC support or repair gig, I would assume.

    In terms of study materials, I would just buy one of the books that is most popular at Amazon dot com.

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    vgh

    There was an article here on TR just recently about the top IT certs for 2012. I don't believe A+ was one of them.

    However if you're new to IT I would suggest you have a core understanding of it's principles at least. I got my A+ and Net+ certs a few years ago, and if I had it to do over again, I probably would still study the A+ curriculum, but not sure if I would take the test.

    There are so many different specializations in IT so if you can narrow that down a bit, that might give you a better direction to aim for. Also, I don't know what experience you have, but certs are no substitute. They can help you get an entry level job at best (A+ may be helpful in this regard) and once you have some experience and have a better sense of direction, then focus on the higher end certs to climb the ladder so to speak.

    Good luck.

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    davidcantor

    What do employers think about CCNA certification?

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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    In terms of jobs, an entry-level network support person would be a lot more money than an entry-level PC support person.

    Keep in mind, however, that a PC support person can get a job at LOTS of different companies (everything from BestBuy to a small business, to a large enterprise),

    While a network person is more limited, as most normal folks don't have a Cisco converged switched network at home, and Cisco-trained folks would work for either a large VAR or reseller, or a medium or large company.

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    1 Votes
    bdaugherty

    As the IT Director for our firm, I've had to hire a couple of IT people. Resumes without at least A+ wouldn't be considered. A+ is an entry level certification. Every technology person should have the basics and be able to prove them to a potential employer or have another similar cert like MCITP/MCSE that would include the same basic skills. With only A+ you are looking at entry level IT jobs. But it's a fairly easy exam and a great way to get on the certification bandwagon. Nothing is more impressive to non-techs than all those initials after your name.

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    A+ is a very basic certification which basically says you can do basic computer troubleshooting and maintenance. I hate to sound pessimistic, but I would not expect employers would be looking to hire someone strictly based on that cert.

    In terms of jobs, some sort of entry-level PC support or repair gig, I would assume.

    In terms of study materials, I would just buy one of the books that is most popular at Amazon dot com.

    +
    0 Votes
    vgh

    There was an article here on TR just recently about the top IT certs for 2012. I don't believe A+ was one of them.

    However if you're new to IT I would suggest you have a core understanding of it's principles at least. I got my A+ and Net+ certs a few years ago, and if I had it to do over again, I probably would still study the A+ curriculum, but not sure if I would take the test.

    There are so many different specializations in IT so if you can narrow that down a bit, that might give you a better direction to aim for. Also, I don't know what experience you have, but certs are no substitute. They can help you get an entry level job at best (A+ may be helpful in this regard) and once you have some experience and have a better sense of direction, then focus on the higher end certs to climb the ladder so to speak.

    Good luck.

    +
    0 Votes
    davidcantor

    What do employers think about CCNA certification?

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    In terms of jobs, an entry-level network support person would be a lot more money than an entry-level PC support person.

    Keep in mind, however, that a PC support person can get a job at LOTS of different companies (everything from BestBuy to a small business, to a large enterprise),

    While a network person is more limited, as most normal folks don't have a Cisco converged switched network at home, and Cisco-trained folks would work for either a large VAR or reseller, or a medium or large company.

    +
    1 Votes
    bdaugherty

    As the IT Director for our firm, I've had to hire a couple of IT people. Resumes without at least A+ wouldn't be considered. A+ is an entry level certification. Every technology person should have the basics and be able to prove them to a potential employer or have another similar cert like MCITP/MCSE that would include the same basic skills. With only A+ you are looking at entry level IT jobs. But it's a fairly easy exam and a great way to get on the certification bandwagon. Nothing is more impressive to non-techs than all those initials after your name.