Questions

What are the issues with hosting my companies website onsite?

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What are the issues with hosting my companies website onsite?

ndveitch
Hi There,

I am looking for information on hosting my own company website. At the moment I am hosting the website through a web hosting company and was wondering about changing that so that I host my company website onsite. The reason I was thinking about this is I have 10 static IP addresses that I currently have as well as a few machines lying around the office.

Would it be a wise move to maybe get a LAMP or WAMP server up and running and connect it via one of my spare IP addresses and then host my companies website onsite as apposed to paying some other company to host our website? To me it seems like a good choice, it's just that normally when something seems like an easy option it could go horribly pear shaped. If it would be a good thing could someone send me some links on the best way to get this working.

I am busy searching the net for more information but i find that usually the best info comes from the guys at TR.
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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Never underestimate the cleverness and persistence of attackers or the probability that hardware will fail catastrophically at precisely the wrong time.

    While, in theory, if you have the spare sheet metal and lots of time, you can build your own 747, it is more likely that the commercially available product will be more reliable, more secure, and less likely to require many unpaid hours of troubleshooting, repair, and fine-tuning.

    If the machines you have lying around the office are rack-mount Dell servers with raid arrays, dual power supplies, and run VMware vMotion to allow seamless fault-tolerant failover to an alternate OS image, then I say go for it.

    If, however, these computers are some old white-box workstations with a ten-year old power supply and a well-worn Seagate hard drive, then there is a certain amount of risk there, in my opinion.

    Also, typically a web hosting company has a 24x7 operations center which has real people watching a big color monitor showing both when systems go offline or when attacks are happening. And the servers are in racks in a nice guarded data center, with redundant power, cooling, automatic fire suppression, etc.

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    ndveitch

    After posting this I was reading over a few blogs and by the third blog I decided that although it would be a nice idea, it would not be practical as the lines here in South Africa are not the greatest. So I am going to rather leave it up to our web hosting guys to monitor. Heck i pay them for the up time so might as well leave the headaches with them lol .

    Thanx again anyway for the response. :)

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    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Good plan.

    Here in the States we are fortunate to have some very good broadband service, so from a pure uptime perspective, hosting things yourself is not an issue.

    However it is the support, patching, monitoring, and things that go 'poof' at 3AM that is the real issue.

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Never underestimate the cleverness and persistence of attackers or the probability that hardware will fail catastrophically at precisely the wrong time.

    While, in theory, if you have the spare sheet metal and lots of time, you can build your own 747, it is more likely that the commercially available product will be more reliable, more secure, and less likely to require many unpaid hours of troubleshooting, repair, and fine-tuning.

    If the machines you have lying around the office are rack-mount Dell servers with raid arrays, dual power supplies, and run VMware vMotion to allow seamless fault-tolerant failover to an alternate OS image, then I say go for it.

    If, however, these computers are some old white-box workstations with a ten-year old power supply and a well-worn Seagate hard drive, then there is a certain amount of risk there, in my opinion.

    Also, typically a web hosting company has a 24x7 operations center which has real people watching a big color monitor showing both when systems go offline or when attacks are happening. And the servers are in racks in a nice guarded data center, with redundant power, cooling, automatic fire suppression, etc.

    +
    0 Votes
    ndveitch

    After posting this I was reading over a few blogs and by the third blog I decided that although it would be a nice idea, it would not be practical as the lines here in South Africa are not the greatest. So I am going to rather leave it up to our web hosting guys to monitor. Heck i pay them for the up time so might as well leave the headaches with them lol .

    Thanx again anyway for the response. :)

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Good plan.

    Here in the States we are fortunate to have some very good broadband service, so from a pure uptime perspective, hosting things yourself is not an issue.

    However it is the support, patching, monitoring, and things that go 'poof' at 3AM that is the real issue.