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What if you have been unemployed for quite some time?

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What if you have been unemployed for quite some time?

anandydr
Hi,

There can be situations when you take a sabbatical for something like a month or two. But there can be situations when you have been laid off, or you have been looking for past few months and been unable to find a positions. Recruiters can very well see behind response like "personal reasons" or "I quit due to differences with my manager".
How can we best cope up with situations like that??

Regards,
Anand Kumar.
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    jkameleon

    ... you don't have much chance in IT anymore, I'm afraid. You are getting too expensive, and jobs are leaving elsewhere, to places like Rwanda and North Korea.

    http://www.gpic.nl/IT_in_NKorea.pdf

    You'll just have to take a forklift training... or something.

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    BusinessNewsie

    Hey don't knock on forklift training! It's very beneficial in using the equipment correctly and not as easy as you would assume. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has very specific rules about <a href="http://www.everythingforklifts.com/">forklift operator training and licensing</a>. Operators must pass classroom training and a driving test before being licensed, must be over 18 years of age, and must be re-certified every three years.

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    oldbaritone

    I'm not familiar with India, but do you have temporary labor contractors? Here in the US, there are companies who subcontract labor to large employers, so the large employer does not hire the labor directly. The positions are "temporary" or "contract", as contrasted with "permanent employee."

    These "job shops" can be a good way to get back into the regular job market. The major employer does not take the risk, and if things don't work out they get someone else, and your contract ends. OTOH, if the employer likes you, there is a process that they can hire you away from the "job shop" and make you permanent.

    Ironically, many "permanent" employees tenure is shorter than other "temporary contract" employees. Also, frequently the temporary employees make more money than their "regular employee" counterparts because contracted overtime is compensated, while regular "exempt" employees are expected to work overtime with little or no additional compensation.

    There are pros and cons to subcontracting, but here in the US it can be a way back into the work force for someone in the situation you describe. Perhaps there is something similar in your country.

    Good Luck.

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    anandydr

    Thanks for your post,

    In India we don't have "job-shops" somehow we do have consultants who would hire a number of people and subcontract IT or IT enabled services.
    I've applied to a few let's hope for the best. In addition if there are any HR professional reading these may I have some suggestions on type of resume and facing interviews. I've googled for it and can't find anything close to this situation.

    Regards,
    Anand

  • +
    0 Votes
    jkameleon

    ... you don't have much chance in IT anymore, I'm afraid. You are getting too expensive, and jobs are leaving elsewhere, to places like Rwanda and North Korea.

    http://www.gpic.nl/IT_in_NKorea.pdf

    You'll just have to take a forklift training... or something.

    +
    0 Votes
    BusinessNewsie

    Hey don't knock on forklift training! It's very beneficial in using the equipment correctly and not as easy as you would assume. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has very specific rules about <a href="http://www.everythingforklifts.com/">forklift operator training and licensing</a>. Operators must pass classroom training and a driving test before being licensed, must be over 18 years of age, and must be re-certified every three years.

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    0 Votes
    oldbaritone

    I'm not familiar with India, but do you have temporary labor contractors? Here in the US, there are companies who subcontract labor to large employers, so the large employer does not hire the labor directly. The positions are "temporary" or "contract", as contrasted with "permanent employee."

    These "job shops" can be a good way to get back into the regular job market. The major employer does not take the risk, and if things don't work out they get someone else, and your contract ends. OTOH, if the employer likes you, there is a process that they can hire you away from the "job shop" and make you permanent.

    Ironically, many "permanent" employees tenure is shorter than other "temporary contract" employees. Also, frequently the temporary employees make more money than their "regular employee" counterparts because contracted overtime is compensated, while regular "exempt" employees are expected to work overtime with little or no additional compensation.

    There are pros and cons to subcontracting, but here in the US it can be a way back into the work force for someone in the situation you describe. Perhaps there is something similar in your country.

    Good Luck.

    +
    0 Votes
    anandydr

    Thanks for your post,

    In India we don't have "job-shops" somehow we do have consultants who would hire a number of people and subcontract IT or IT enabled services.
    I've applied to a few let's hope for the best. In addition if there are any HR professional reading these may I have some suggestions on type of resume and facing interviews. I've googled for it and can't find anything close to this situation.

    Regards,
    Anand