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What is the best OS to use as a real machine and virtual machine host?

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What is the best OS to use as a real machine and virtual machine host?

stevenospam2000
I'm a noob so maybe this should be a discussion. I am building a new computer around the i7 Intel processor. The computer will have two primary functions. The first will be my day-to-day use of Windows desktop programs (MS Office, web browsing, financial, etc.). The second function will be A/V including Slingbox, Mediamonkey, Win Media Player, VLC, etc.

My goal is to select the best operating system as the base under which to run the virtual machine(s). Past experiments led me to conclude VMPlayer offers better performance than VirtualBox for my needs. I would like to dedicate a monitor, mouse and keyboard to the A/v Win 7 system as well as a physical disk. I'm thinking my two options are some variant of Linux (Ubuntu?) with two Win 7 virtual machines or Win 7 as the base operating system with the A/V environment implemented in a Win 7 virtual machine. Has anyone played with this? Any suggestions/comments are welcome.
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    1 Votes
    seanferd

    You only have one instance per license, so consider this limitation.

    Any particular reason you want to have separate VMs in the first place? And what do you mean by dedicating peripherals/input devices?

    As to your title question, there is none, really.

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    stevenospam2000

    I have 2 Win 7 licenses available. I want the second VM usable by another person to watch movies or play music. The 2nd vm will have its own monitor, mouse and keyboard.

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    1 Votes
    kdavislex

    XenServer is a good bare metal hypervisor as is ESXi. I like the interface better on XenServer. You can host the OS's there and be able to give someone access through a remote client. You are welcome to email if you have more questions. If you were just hosting it for yourself, XenClient is a good solution if all the hardware matches up, which is usually the problem.

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    lmalhoit Contributor

    I think a lot of it comes down to personal preference and what you have available. If you're using 64bit, I would go with ESXi...I think there's way more support and documention available which can be really helpful. At home, I have an old 32 bit machine, so I went with Ubuntu and VirtualBox. I started blogging about my experience with Ubuntu/VirtualBox if you're interested.
    www.networkingIT.wordpress.com. If you have any questions, feel free...

  • +
    1 Votes
    seanferd

    You only have one instance per license, so consider this limitation.

    Any particular reason you want to have separate VMs in the first place? And what do you mean by dedicating peripherals/input devices?

    As to your title question, there is none, really.

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    0 Votes
    stevenospam2000

    I have 2 Win 7 licenses available. I want the second VM usable by another person to watch movies or play music. The 2nd vm will have its own monitor, mouse and keyboard.

    +
    1 Votes
    kdavislex

    XenServer is a good bare metal hypervisor as is ESXi. I like the interface better on XenServer. You can host the OS's there and be able to give someone access through a remote client. You are welcome to email if you have more questions. If you were just hosting it for yourself, XenClient is a good solution if all the hardware matches up, which is usually the problem.

    +
    1 Votes
    lmalhoit Contributor

    I think a lot of it comes down to personal preference and what you have available. If you're using 64bit, I would go with ESXi...I think there's way more support and documention available which can be really helpful. At home, I have an old 32 bit machine, so I went with Ubuntu and VirtualBox. I started blogging about my experience with Ubuntu/VirtualBox if you're interested.
    www.networkingIT.wordpress.com. If you have any questions, feel free...