Questions

What is the most reliable Hard Drive brand for a Laptop?

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What is the most reliable Hard Drive brand for a Laptop?

Alec Lerg
Those are my options:
Seagate
Toshiba
Western Digital
So far I have had bad experience with Western Digital, out of 100 laptops 8 have had Hard Drive problems, so I put Western Digital out of my personal list, but this is my personal experience.
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    OH Smeg

    That is like asking how long is that bit of string in my pocket that you can not see?

    There are way too many variables here ranging from the design of the NB itself which may not have any chassis connection to conduct heat away from the HDD to the way that the NB is used and abused. I've seen NB's on Dig Sites just shut up stuffed into a NB Bag and thrown around and the owners wonder why the unit has problems.

    I've seen students stick a NB onto their bed with loose coverings which get sucked up and block the cooling intakes and they wonder why the cook the NB and it needs repairs.

    I've also seen CEO's abuse NB's dramatically and they then complain that it broke and they needed to get the IT Staff to repair it. It was the NB's fault that it broke because they where trawling Porn Sites and infected the NB's OS or that they dropped it while walking around with it and destroyed the HDD.

    What you need to ask is what will the NB actually be used for, By Who and how will it be abused. Then you can chose a suitable NB for that user and it's intended use. Expecting a Domestic Class unit to work as well in a extreme environment as a Ruggerized NB does is not fair to anything especially the Domestic Class hardware which was never originally designed for that use.

    If the unit is going to be abused and moved about while the HDD is running then a HDD with no moving parts is the best option though it has it's own disadvantages it will be more reliable even though it is much more expensive and lacks capacity of a Mechanical Drive.

    In the same manner a NB never moved from the desk with a Cool Pad under it and is used instead of a desktop a Mechanical Drive which is considerably cheaper and a lot bigger for less money would be fine for that user.

    As for different brands of Mechanical Drives it all depends on the things going on in the factory the day that the drive was made, it's capacity and many other things that are too numerous to mention.

    I've had HDD from all brands fail in NB's over the years to such an extent that I personally prefer Seagate Drives but I'm sure that there will be many people who have found other drives to be more reliable from their replacement experience.

    But Toshiba itself doesn't make any Drives they buy them in from whoever has the best deal this day, currently you have 3 drive makers to chose from

    Seagate

    Western Digital

    Hitachi

    Col

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    jlibster

    My experience with laptop drives (and server drives as well) is that the Hitachi TravelStar series is the best. I've had problems with Western Digital and even more with Seagate (untested firmware that shuts off drives, early bad sectors). Western Digital wasn't being accepted into the Server world seriously for awhile so they purchased Hitachi Global Storage. That said, it appears that Western Digital has left the manufacturing process and name unaltered, so I think the same reliability I've experienced with Hitachi Global Storage drives is still in force. Avoid Solid State Drives for critical data; the mean time between failures is significantly lower than conventional drives...at least for now. I'm sure in time that will improve.

    I know you are avoiding Western Digital, but for people out there who use Western Digital, avoid the "Green" (low end) drives in the 3.5" series. The power saving feature appears to add wear and tear to the drives making them die faster. For servers I use the Hitachi Ultrastar series combined with Western Digital Enterprise drives (50/50 ratio on RAID 6 or RAID 10). The reason I mix is because if you happen to get drives from the same manufacturing batch (I order several drives at a time), they often fail at the same time and I won't use Seagate due to quality control problems that still exist as of this posting.

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    Charles Bundy

    I've had pretty good luck with the following

    Laptop -
    SSD - OCZ (only used the Vertex 3 series so far)
    Mech - Seagate

    Desktop -
    SSD - Intel
    Mech - Western Digital (RE4 for RAID, Black series for non-Raid applications)

  • +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    That is like asking how long is that bit of string in my pocket that you can not see?

    There are way too many variables here ranging from the design of the NB itself which may not have any chassis connection to conduct heat away from the HDD to the way that the NB is used and abused. I've seen NB's on Dig Sites just shut up stuffed into a NB Bag and thrown around and the owners wonder why the unit has problems.

    I've seen students stick a NB onto their bed with loose coverings which get sucked up and block the cooling intakes and they wonder why the cook the NB and it needs repairs.

    I've also seen CEO's abuse NB's dramatically and they then complain that it broke and they needed to get the IT Staff to repair it. It was the NB's fault that it broke because they where trawling Porn Sites and infected the NB's OS or that they dropped it while walking around with it and destroyed the HDD.

    What you need to ask is what will the NB actually be used for, By Who and how will it be abused. Then you can chose a suitable NB for that user and it's intended use. Expecting a Domestic Class unit to work as well in a extreme environment as a Ruggerized NB does is not fair to anything especially the Domestic Class hardware which was never originally designed for that use.

    If the unit is going to be abused and moved about while the HDD is running then a HDD with no moving parts is the best option though it has it's own disadvantages it will be more reliable even though it is much more expensive and lacks capacity of a Mechanical Drive.

    In the same manner a NB never moved from the desk with a Cool Pad under it and is used instead of a desktop a Mechanical Drive which is considerably cheaper and a lot bigger for less money would be fine for that user.

    As for different brands of Mechanical Drives it all depends on the things going on in the factory the day that the drive was made, it's capacity and many other things that are too numerous to mention.

    I've had HDD from all brands fail in NB's over the years to such an extent that I personally prefer Seagate Drives but I'm sure that there will be many people who have found other drives to be more reliable from their replacement experience.

    But Toshiba itself doesn't make any Drives they buy them in from whoever has the best deal this day, currently you have 3 drive makers to chose from

    Seagate

    Western Digital

    Hitachi

    Col

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    0 Votes
    jlibster

    My experience with laptop drives (and server drives as well) is that the Hitachi TravelStar series is the best. I've had problems with Western Digital and even more with Seagate (untested firmware that shuts off drives, early bad sectors). Western Digital wasn't being accepted into the Server world seriously for awhile so they purchased Hitachi Global Storage. That said, it appears that Western Digital has left the manufacturing process and name unaltered, so I think the same reliability I've experienced with Hitachi Global Storage drives is still in force. Avoid Solid State Drives for critical data; the mean time between failures is significantly lower than conventional drives...at least for now. I'm sure in time that will improve.

    I know you are avoiding Western Digital, but for people out there who use Western Digital, avoid the "Green" (low end) drives in the 3.5" series. The power saving feature appears to add wear and tear to the drives making them die faster. For servers I use the Hitachi Ultrastar series combined with Western Digital Enterprise drives (50/50 ratio on RAID 6 or RAID 10). The reason I mix is because if you happen to get drives from the same manufacturing batch (I order several drives at a time), they often fail at the same time and I won't use Seagate due to quality control problems that still exist as of this posting.

    +
    0 Votes
    Charles Bundy

    I've had pretty good luck with the following

    Laptop -
    SSD - OCZ (only used the Vertex 3 series so far)
    Mech - Seagate

    Desktop -
    SSD - Intel
    Mech - Western Digital (RE4 for RAID, Black series for non-Raid applications)