Questions

what is the next step i must take ?

Tags:
+
0 Votes
Locked

what is the next step i must take ?

chandrashekar678
Hello Experts,

I work in a service desk and i have a simple job of managing user accounts on active directory.
I am looking to move on to a better profile . I hold a bachelors degree in engineering I want to learn scripting however do not know how to start or i don't know if it is good thing to learn.
I am looking for your help . can some one suggest me as to how i can make a progress from my current level.
  • +
    0 Votes
    databaseben

    you can try doing a bing for powershell.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Knowing about scripting is a valuable job skill for any system administrator.

    There's this place called the Internet that has literally millions of sites related to programming and scripting.

    Knowing scripting will not get you a better job.

    You need to determine what sort of job or position suits both your skills and desires, and then determine how to train or prepare for it. If you seek some more advanced system administrator position, for example, getting the appropriate certifications would be good start.

    +
    0 Votes
    OurITLady

    and by that I mean what other IT departments are there? If you have a systems administration team nearby, try talking to them and see what their job involves and whether it sounds as if you would want to work there, same if you have a DBA team, programming team, IT security team, etc. Talking to those actually doing the job will give you a better idea where you want to go in your career, you could then see if there is a chance to take on a few basic tasks for that department or get involved in a project they're working on (probably in a limited capacity or part-time initially while still working service desk). I suspect that's how many of us here started, and service desk (if you're lucky and you work with it) gives you the chance to sample lots of different areas of IT and figure out which you enjoy most.

    P.S. The best bit of advice I suspect any of us could provide is go for something you want to do not what you think you can make the most money doing. If you enjoy scripting go for it, but you'll find IT changes so often if you do something for the money more than the enjoyment you'll be out of work very quickly because you won't have the drive to stay updated - at least in my experience.

    +
    0 Votes
    JPElectron

    You need to show initiative, think about how you can add value in your organization ...

    Set out to automate something or fix something via a script, figure out how to do it using Google or otherwise. Some examples you might consider...
    - How could I update software XX, if I find that it is installed on the user's workstation, automatically, then next time they login?
    - How could I configure an Outlook profile for the user who just logged in, automatically, assuming they haven't used Outlook before on this machine?
    - How could I add a network printer, automatically, assuming it is not already installed?
    - How could I check for the absence of software XX or a patch, and then prompt the user to install it?

    Powershell does seem to be the future, but there is plenty of value in learning how to write .bat .vbs, and kixtart scripts which all are widely used today.

  • +
    0 Votes
    databaseben

    you can try doing a bing for powershell.

    +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Knowing about scripting is a valuable job skill for any system administrator.

    There's this place called the Internet that has literally millions of sites related to programming and scripting.

    Knowing scripting will not get you a better job.

    You need to determine what sort of job or position suits both your skills and desires, and then determine how to train or prepare for it. If you seek some more advanced system administrator position, for example, getting the appropriate certifications would be good start.

    +
    0 Votes
    OurITLady

    and by that I mean what other IT departments are there? If you have a systems administration team nearby, try talking to them and see what their job involves and whether it sounds as if you would want to work there, same if you have a DBA team, programming team, IT security team, etc. Talking to those actually doing the job will give you a better idea where you want to go in your career, you could then see if there is a chance to take on a few basic tasks for that department or get involved in a project they're working on (probably in a limited capacity or part-time initially while still working service desk). I suspect that's how many of us here started, and service desk (if you're lucky and you work with it) gives you the chance to sample lots of different areas of IT and figure out which you enjoy most.

    P.S. The best bit of advice I suspect any of us could provide is go for something you want to do not what you think you can make the most money doing. If you enjoy scripting go for it, but you'll find IT changes so often if you do something for the money more than the enjoyment you'll be out of work very quickly because you won't have the drive to stay updated - at least in my experience.

    +
    0 Votes
    JPElectron

    You need to show initiative, think about how you can add value in your organization ...

    Set out to automate something or fix something via a script, figure out how to do it using Google or otherwise. Some examples you might consider...
    - How could I update software XX, if I find that it is installed on the user's workstation, automatically, then next time they login?
    - How could I configure an Outlook profile for the user who just logged in, automatically, assuming they haven't used Outlook before on this machine?
    - How could I add a network printer, automatically, assuming it is not already installed?
    - How could I check for the absence of software XX or a patch, and then prompt the user to install it?

    Powershell does seem to be the future, but there is plenty of value in learning how to write .bat .vbs, and kixtart scripts which all are widely used today.