Questions

Who makes a high quailty DSL Modem?

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Who makes a high quailty DSL Modem?

WhyDoMath
The small business I work in uses DSL service from the local phone company, basically because this is what we can afford. DSL is used constantly for claims transmission about 10 hours a day as well a credit card transactions, and a descent amount in web use. The phone company sells Speedstream 4200 modems, a Siemens product which last 8 to 12 months. I keep the modem vacuumed off to prevent dust clogging but it still stays pretty hot. It is used in bridge mode with the gateway router doing PPPoE authentication. Is there any such thing as a business-class DSL modem and if so who makes it?
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    http://preview.tinyurl.com/33zhcut

    You could always mount a fan on your modem to keep it cool though you will have to think how.

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    TheChas

    If you do decide to get a different modem, make sure it is compatible with the specific DSL network from your provider. One of the dirty secrets of DSL is that each provider can set up their networks such that alternate modems will not work properly.

    Also, if you use a different modem, you may have more problems with support from the provider as they may blame your non-standard modem as the source of any connectivity problems you have.

    I have a Speedstream 4100 and while it is warm to the touch, I would not say it is hot.

    Do you change the power supply when you change the modem? Even if you do, I would start by checking the voltage from the power supply. If it is high, that is the source of your heat as the voltage regulator in the modem will run hotter if the supply voltage is high. Try and find a fully regulated power supply to replace the existing power supply, and you should get much better life from your modem.

    I would even go so far as to have a solid surge suppressor and UPS on the power line.

    Chas

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    WhyDoMath

    Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

    The modem, gateway, and switch are all powered from a UPS, so the AC voltage in should OK. I had not thought about checking the DC to the modem, good idea. I probably changed the power supply the last time, but I'm not sure.

    I'm going to look for a small fan I can mount on the wall and direct toward the modem/router/switch.

    We were having intermittent DSL drops again yesterday and I got to a level 2 support guy who noticed that our DSL connection was in "training mode", whatever that means. He changed that to his preferred status and the service drops went away. There's no substitute for experience.

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    Vandy-SJ

    Having had several DSL modems/routers from the ISP replaced over the years, I found that they live longer with adequate air flow around all sides of the unit itself and the AC power adapter - both which seem to run warm. I added taller 'feet' (stick-on rubber feet) to the bottom of the DSL unit to allow more air under the bottom, and made sure there was air space around the sides and top so heat would disipate easily. Running a fan for extra cooling is not a bad idea - though I never had to do that. My DSL modem/router failure rate dropped significantly after adding the taller feet. The other advice posted here is all good.

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    Orodreth

    I bought a Siemens SpeedStream 5360 on eBay 6yr ago and it hasn't failed yet. I've had a few problems over the years that were resolved by powering off the modem for a few minutes.

    However, I dropped dial tone from DSL service and I had to buy, and use the ISP's Motorola DSL modem. These have activation codes, and internal proprietary software for making the DSL connection to the ISP. The software only works with Windows or OSX.

    I'd say most vendor DSL modems providing aDSL and aDSL/2 should last a long, long time but make sure its compatible with your ISP.

  • +
    0 Votes

    http://preview.tinyurl.com/33zhcut

    You could always mount a fan on your modem to keep it cool though you will have to think how.

    +
    0 Votes
    TheChas

    If you do decide to get a different modem, make sure it is compatible with the specific DSL network from your provider. One of the dirty secrets of DSL is that each provider can set up their networks such that alternate modems will not work properly.

    Also, if you use a different modem, you may have more problems with support from the provider as they may blame your non-standard modem as the source of any connectivity problems you have.

    I have a Speedstream 4100 and while it is warm to the touch, I would not say it is hot.

    Do you change the power supply when you change the modem? Even if you do, I would start by checking the voltage from the power supply. If it is high, that is the source of your heat as the voltage regulator in the modem will run hotter if the supply voltage is high. Try and find a fully regulated power supply to replace the existing power supply, and you should get much better life from your modem.

    I would even go so far as to have a solid surge suppressor and UPS on the power line.

    Chas

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    0 Votes
    WhyDoMath

    Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

    The modem, gateway, and switch are all powered from a UPS, so the AC voltage in should OK. I had not thought about checking the DC to the modem, good idea. I probably changed the power supply the last time, but I'm not sure.

    I'm going to look for a small fan I can mount on the wall and direct toward the modem/router/switch.

    We were having intermittent DSL drops again yesterday and I got to a level 2 support guy who noticed that our DSL connection was in "training mode", whatever that means. He changed that to his preferred status and the service drops went away. There's no substitute for experience.

    +
    0 Votes
    Vandy-SJ

    Having had several DSL modems/routers from the ISP replaced over the years, I found that they live longer with adequate air flow around all sides of the unit itself and the AC power adapter - both which seem to run warm. I added taller 'feet' (stick-on rubber feet) to the bottom of the DSL unit to allow more air under the bottom, and made sure there was air space around the sides and top so heat would disipate easily. Running a fan for extra cooling is not a bad idea - though I never had to do that. My DSL modem/router failure rate dropped significantly after adding the taller feet. The other advice posted here is all good.

    +
    0 Votes
    Orodreth

    I bought a Siemens SpeedStream 5360 on eBay 6yr ago and it hasn't failed yet. I've had a few problems over the years that were resolved by powering off the modem for a few minutes.

    However, I dropped dial tone from DSL service and I had to buy, and use the ISP's Motorola DSL modem. These have activation codes, and internal proprietary software for making the DSL connection to the ISP. The software only works with Windows or OSX.

    I'd say most vendor DSL modems providing aDSL and aDSL/2 should last a long, long time but make sure its compatible with your ISP.