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Wifi for 1000 users in small area.

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Wifi for 1000 users in small area.

cclarkdal
Hello,
I work for a large hotel chain. I have a group coming in that will have 1000 wireless users (laptops and Smart Phones) in one room, theater setting. If you think of a church or movie theater that seats 1000 people, this is the size of the room I am looking at.
Is it even possible to set up enough wifi to support this many in such a small area? 802.11n would be my choice but not sure how many routers to place if this is possible without interference. Any help would be appriciated.
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    CG IT

    using the Class C subnet, block size can only provide 254 addresses on that subnet. So if you use consumer level wireless "routers" they only hand out 254 addresses.

    But if you use wirless access points, then your only limited to the number of addresses your DHCP server can hand out and that is also determined by the Class DHCP was setup to use. Class C and your limited to 254 addresses.

    As far as performance, that's entirely different. Your overall network bandwidth and your internet badwidth capabilities determines user experience. If you have 1000 users all downloading very large files, your going to run into performance problems.

    But conceivably, you could stick one or 2 wireless access points in the hall and as long as your network subnet isn't Class C, your network guy should be able to put in a DHCP scope that will provide your 1000 users with an address on the network. Once they have an address, as long as they get the DNS and default gateway addressing from DHCP, they all should have internet access.

    Note: this is a very simple, very general explanation. Consumer level routers and access points all use the private class C addressing scheme and don't allow using anything else. So if that's all you have then your stuck with 254 addresses on the subnet. You'll have to create 5 subnets to have coverage for all uses. Those 5 subnets all then have to be configured to route clients on their respective subnets to the company network which is the default gateway out.

    Expect very slow or unresponsive network performance if your using consumer or SMB equipment.

  • +
    0 Votes
    CG IT

    using the Class C subnet, block size can only provide 254 addresses on that subnet. So if you use consumer level wireless "routers" they only hand out 254 addresses.

    But if you use wirless access points, then your only limited to the number of addresses your DHCP server can hand out and that is also determined by the Class DHCP was setup to use. Class C and your limited to 254 addresses.

    As far as performance, that's entirely different. Your overall network bandwidth and your internet badwidth capabilities determines user experience. If you have 1000 users all downloading very large files, your going to run into performance problems.

    But conceivably, you could stick one or 2 wireless access points in the hall and as long as your network subnet isn't Class C, your network guy should be able to put in a DHCP scope that will provide your 1000 users with an address on the network. Once they have an address, as long as they get the DNS and default gateway addressing from DHCP, they all should have internet access.

    Note: this is a very simple, very general explanation. Consumer level routers and access points all use the private class C addressing scheme and don't allow using anything else. So if that's all you have then your stuck with 254 addresses on the subnet. You'll have to create 5 subnets to have coverage for all uses. Those 5 subnets all then have to be configured to route clients on their respective subnets to the company network which is the default gateway out.

    Expect very slow or unresponsive network performance if your using consumer or SMB equipment.