Questions

Windows Server 2003: Active Directory Setup Guide Needed

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Windows Server 2003: Active Directory Setup Guide Needed

mandocia
Hello, I have had problems getting xp pro computers to join my Windows Server 2003 Domain. I have decided to start over, and am going to format my server and start from scratch.

My question is as follows: is there a good guide for me to use to get this going correctly? I have used internet guides found in google up to this point, and nothing works. I need a guide that works but also explains why things are set up the way they are. Keep in mind, this is my first attempt to do this, and I do not know much as of yet. Thanks.


Daminious
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    mike

    If you ignore your problems they don't go away... What kind of errors are you getting? Try to figure out what the issue is cause it really sux when you reformat, reinstall, setup, and have the same problem.

    -Mike

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    oh

    mike

    just saw your post w/ problems....

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    mandocia

    I have reinstalled once already, but the same issues I had before came up, however I did things differently. This is why I need a guide, because the ones I find online do not seem to work, I guess they assume you will know things without them telling you.

    I plan to go through the install process again, but this time make sure the domain name is local, and that the NIC's tcp/ip settings point to the local DNS before I try to join a domain. If those things do not work, then I may have to consider the problem to be within my client machines themselves.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    even with XP Pro SP2 the client computer should be able to reach the domain controller to join the domain.

    There isn't any 1 white paper that explains everything about setting up a domain controller [running a Microsoft Active Directory domain]. The reason is that a DC has a couple of different components that comprise a DC. DNS is one of them and that subject has one whole book [and more] devoted just to DNS. Active Directory is another whole book as well as DHCP.

    the best place to start is to understand DNS because Active Directory relies upon DNS to function properly. Active Directory is Directory Services. Everything in Active Directory is considered an object. Active Directory uses containers to collect objects. These containers are Organizational Units. With these containers, you can group users, computers, printers, and assign permissions to access these resources. You can control users computer environment using group policy. Group Policy is a set of policies you can apply to containers that contain users or computer accounts. you can deploy software to users via group policy.

    so as you can see, Active Directory is a complicated mechanism that isn't covered under a white paper, rather is covered in a book.

    Microsoft Technet is a great resource

    here is a link for Technet on DNS
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/technologies/featured/dns/default.mspx

    This is a link for Active Directory concepts on Technet

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/77a19ae8-bffe-42ca-a841-3d18ea62dc9b1033.mspx

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    CG IT

    if your starting over, install Windows Server 2003. apply SP1 and get all the updates from the Window Update site before proceeding in creating your Domain Controller [DC]. If your creating this domain controller as a test network to learn Active Directory services, choose a Class C addressing scheme for your server NIC. A suggestion would be to use 192.168.1.1 as the server address, subnet mask 255.255.255.0. When you setup DHCP, the address pool would be 192.168.1.2 - 253 subnet mask 255.255.255.0. that gives you 252 hosts [or workstations which can get addresses]. note: you do not have to install DHCP for Active Directory to work or function nor is it a basic configuration requirement. you can install DHCP after the server becomes a DC.

    once your server has basic configurations completed, you can dcpromo promote it to a domain controller.

    here's a Technet link on how to create a DC on a Windows 2003 server using dcpromo promote and the Active Directory wizard.

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/87e58caa-b7f1-4c72-9c5c-b478aa53fc361033.mspx

    In choosing a domain name to use, I recommend using the .local extension rather than the public .com/net/org.

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    CG IT

    once you have your server promoted to a Domain controller you then need to join workstations to the domain.

    here is a technet article on joining a domain.

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/7207aa3e-d95d-4176-a1ca-bc629f1ca6981033.mspx

    here's a small troubleshooting Technet article. Small but....

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/2b0efdba-33e4-432d-a284-fd56a5db4c6a1033.mspx

    note: you should have your domain controller connected to a switch and your workstations also connect to the switch. you can join workstations to the domain the same way you join it to a workgroup. here's a technet article on that

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/156d7205-0032-4116-8fb6-c4fd4342ba571033.mspx

    the only difference is that you would specify a domain rather than a workgroup. when you specify the domain name and click ok, you'll be prompted to provide credential to join the computer to the domain. user the administrators account user name and password.

    the workstation will then try to contact the server [Active Directory] to authenticate the user name and password bu query of the DNS server. This appears to be where you had your problem. You had the loopback address 127.0.0.1 as your DNS server when in fact your DNS server's address is the domain controller address The loopback address is just an address [mechanism] for the host to send packets to itself for testing purposes. here's a webopedia on loopback address.

    http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/L/loopback_address.html

    I would recommend getting a book on IP addressing. TCP/IP for Dummies or TCP/IP Jump Start Internet protocol basics are good books for fundamental concepts of TCP/IP

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    CG IT

    here's a technet article on DHCP

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/technologies/dhcp.mspx

    as you can see there's lots of reading material.

    note: even when you install DHCP on the DC, it doesn't just start working. You have to must authorize the DHCP server, then activate it before it will work. see this technet paper
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/e24cbe2a-b9f4-412d-9a4a-1c085b2866f11033.mspx?mfr=true

    note: you don't have to install DHCP. you can use a static addressing scheme. If you want to learn DHCP then by all means install it, however, you can setup your client with a static address. If your server is IP address 192.168.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0, then you can assign the client an address in the same subnet such as 192.168.1.3 mask 255.255.255.0 dns server would be the DC [as when you installed Active Directory using dcpromo promote, the Active Directory wizard will automaticall install DNS [AD needs DNS to function] so, the client computer needs the DC server [which is also the DNS server]address [192.168.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0]

    So that's the quick and dirty, in a nutshell, creating an Active Directory Domain [creating a Doman Controller with DNs and Active Directory running on it].

    For security best practices, there are also articles on Technet.

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    mandocia

    Ok, I have reinstalled Windows Server 2003. I installed the correct drivers, and updated in windows update.

    I set my server's IP Address to 192.168.1.4, because my router is 192.168.1.3, and I felt that was a good area to begin. Also, my router is a DHCP server that assigns address from .100 to .199.

    Both clients are connected to the router, as well as the server.

    I installed Active Directory and choose daminious.local as my domain name. I had the program install the DNS server automatically.

    Once done, I rebooted and set my server's NIC's DNS to 192.168.1.4. I went to my client PC and added in the DNS of 192.168.1.4.

    I went to connect to a domain and then I got a request for a username and password. I put in Administrator, then the password. The following is the result:

    "The following error occured attempting to join the domain "daminious.local"

    The format of the specified network name is invalid"

    I also changed my client's name and made it less then 8 characters, no spaces, which is MDPBook. Same result.

    Thus, I am having the same error as always. I must be doing something wrong someplace.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    should give you an error # like 1212 or 1616.

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    mandocia

    There was no error code given, a popup window titled Computer Name changes appears, and says:

    "The following error occurred attempting to join the domain "daminious.local":

    The format of the specific network name is invalid.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/w2000Msgs/3855.mspx?mfr=true

    User Action:

    If you have a user interface in the application, reenter the network name. A network name can have up to 15 characters and cannot include spaces.


    http://www.braingia.org/webnotes/index.php?p=111&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1

    though this involved windows vista, the problem resided on the W2003 Server. The fix was to rename the host. However, your doing a reinstall so you wouldn't have any residule host names floating around.

    what name and netbios name did you give the server? usually the server name is like server1 or server01. the netbios name could be an abbreviation of the domain name. DAMI or something like that. The restrictions of the # of characters is 15 and there can be no spaces. best not to use special characters

    this is the best I can do as far as suggestions and providing links to resources .

    I saw on your other thread that you tried NSLOOKUP and you could not resovle the server name or even the address to the domain name. that indicates a DNS problem.

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    mandocia

    I started over, yet again, time time I installed the DNS server first then installed Active Directory.

    When I installed active directory, it found my DNS server and installed correctly.

    I am even able to ping my dns address and get a result, so it seems DNS is working.

    This time on the client machine I used the Network Identification Wizard, within it I got to the screen where you put in your username, password, and domain. When I did it told me it found a username matching what I put in, but for the daminious domain, not the daminious.local

    When I tried that, I got DNS errors because DNS is looking for Daminious.local.

    Daminious is the NETBIOS name, so I am wondering if the server is being confused.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    in the event viewer?

    try nslookup and see what is returned from the DC.

    if you successfully joined the workstation to the domain and rebooted, then tried to log in to the domain with the workstation, what happened?

    one of the benefits of having problems and doing setups multiple times is it's a learning experience.

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    mandocia

    When I go to nslookup on the client PC, I get the following:

    Default Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    when I type in mdpserver001.daminious.local, I get the following:

    Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    DNS request timed out.
    timeout was 2 seconds.
    Name: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    Now, when I am on the server and repeat the procedure, the following is the result:

    Default Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    When I type in mdpserver001.daminious.local I get the following:

    Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    Name: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    Thus, I am getting the DNS error from the client machine, but not the server.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    you can do a test on your DNS server [your domain controller which hosts DNS] to check your forward and reverse lookup zones.

    here's a link to Technet article on doing a simple query and a recursive query on your DNS server.

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/f32dee24-aacd-4909-a674-182df5c624fd1033.mspx?mfr=true

    You did not specify if you created a reverse lookup zone therefore if you did not when you try an nslookup using the address, your dns server will time out [no reverse lookup zone configured].

    try the DNS query test on your DNS server.

    let us know the results

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    mandocia

    Ok, I have been looking at my DNS settings and testing them with nslookup. When I try nslookup from my server, it works fine, but if I try with the client I get the following error:

    mdpserver001.daminious.local can't find mdpserver001.daminious.local: Non-existent domain

    I went into the DNS control panel and did a simple query and a recursive query, both passed.

    I have been reading the nslookup error is because of a reverse lookup zone not existing. I did create one, and it has a pointer record that says 192.168.1.4, but I still get the error.

    I also found the nltest utility and was able to see my domain controller on the server, so I am thinking it is a DNS problem.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    for AD to function. you actually don't need a reverse lookup zone. NS lookup ip to name might not work but it doesn't mean your DNS server is faulty. All you need is resource records that say <your domain>.local is IP address such and such so that when you enter a name it resolves to an address.

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    mandocia

    Well, all I know now is no matter what I try it refuses to work. I can ping the dns server and it connects, my tests work, I can see the domain controller.

    I have even removed and reinstalled my network cards thinking that was the issue, nothing changed.

    I have formatted my server and repeated most of these steps many times, I always get the same error: the format of the specified network name is invalid.

    Maybe my equipment cannot handle this or some other issue. My network is on a linksys router, WRT54G, with 4 ports. The server and 1 client is physically connected to it, and one client has wireless connected to it.

    My server is a 1.8gig athlon xp with 765 megs of memory, one client is a duel core athlon 2 gig with 1 gig ram, the other is a single core athlon 2 gig 512 ram notebook.

    I have been looking on the web for help, but nothing works. Is it also possible this is because this is an evaluation version of windows server 2003? Maybe you cannot connect to a domain with it, but then, it would be useless.

    Right now I am lost, I have worked on this for 40 hours so far and nothing, I am wondering if it is possible for me to do with my current skill level.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    so when you try to join your XP workstation to the domain using the network wizard you get an error format of specified network name is invalid?

    what is the name of the XP machine?

    The switch on the router shouldn't interfer with network communications.

    here's something to try. log on to the server with the administrators account. open up active directory users and computer from the administrative tools. create a computer account in the computers OU for your XP workstation using some generic name like Workstation1 or WS1 or whatever. then rename the XP machine to that name. reboot. run the network identification wizard. See what happens.

    the only way to learn is to practice and if you have to read all the documentation and install 50 times, it's well worth the experience.

    Get the Microsoft Press books [Windows Server 2003]Self paced training book for Exam 70-291 as a beginning reference. Has hands step by step practice for installing Windows Server 2003 and goes on with DNS and DHCP.

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    Jacky Howe

    has to start somewhere. Some of us have been there before. Can you go to the client and at a cmd prompt type in ipconfig and let us know the addresses.

    Rob

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    VirginiaBeachBum

    Mastering windows server 2003-Mark Manasi.
    That's how I got my Domain/AD/DNS/DHCP up and running.

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    mandocia

    I have found and fixed the problem.

    As sad, and as annoyed most of you will be, the problem was my poor choice in software.

    In other words, I used a fixed version of 2003 server. I was using a version that was cracked to give a year instead of 6 months. I felt that would give me enough time to really learn it.

    I decided today that may be the problem, and got the official software from microsoft. It worked without any problems at all. I was able to join the domain, and now I can learn the system and how to build it.

    Thus, the moral of the story is: if you want to waste 40-50 hours of your time and be a moron while doing so, use a cracked version. If you want to be smart and do it right, use the official one.

    Daminious

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    mgibbs

    I have setup an entire School without knowing all the ends and outs based upon a single guide book. Windows Server 2003-Administrator's Pocket Consultant. The ISBN# 978-0-7356-2245-6 for around $30.00 US Dollars should give you a great start.
    It is one of the fews things that Microsoft did right!!! Specifically, Chapter 4 seems very helpful...My environment is Windows 2003 R2 Server with Windows XP professional Clients. I have a basic desktop policy and a VB Script that maps network drives and my network printer all running through AD(Active Directory).The book explains in great detail DNS/WINS/DHCP/IPSEC setups.
    Hope this information helps..It did for me.

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    asim.zafir

    Hi,

    We had some issues with our dhcp server running in the enterprise environment. To make it long story short, in order to trouble shoot it effectively we decided to take the dhcp server (was going through several security issues) off the network and wanted to run some test.

    while we took it offline, we ran into issues of dhcp server not authorizing to Active Directory Domain Controller (as it was off production). we promoted the server to Domain Contoller using dcpromo - while that processes ended and the system rebooted, it appeared that i was not able to login through my local password that was initially created on the server? Now we can't get into the server as it refuses the password - any clue what might have gone wrong?

    AZ

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    mike

    If you ignore your problems they don't go away... What kind of errors are you getting? Try to figure out what the issue is cause it really sux when you reformat, reinstall, setup, and have the same problem.

    -Mike

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    oh

    mike

    just saw your post w/ problems....

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    mandocia

    I have reinstalled once already, but the same issues I had before came up, however I did things differently. This is why I need a guide, because the ones I find online do not seem to work, I guess they assume you will know things without them telling you.

    I plan to go through the install process again, but this time make sure the domain name is local, and that the NIC's tcp/ip settings point to the local DNS before I try to join a domain. If those things do not work, then I may have to consider the problem to be within my client machines themselves.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    even with XP Pro SP2 the client computer should be able to reach the domain controller to join the domain.

    There isn't any 1 white paper that explains everything about setting up a domain controller [running a Microsoft Active Directory domain]. The reason is that a DC has a couple of different components that comprise a DC. DNS is one of them and that subject has one whole book [and more] devoted just to DNS. Active Directory is another whole book as well as DHCP.

    the best place to start is to understand DNS because Active Directory relies upon DNS to function properly. Active Directory is Directory Services. Everything in Active Directory is considered an object. Active Directory uses containers to collect objects. These containers are Organizational Units. With these containers, you can group users, computers, printers, and assign permissions to access these resources. You can control users computer environment using group policy. Group Policy is a set of policies you can apply to containers that contain users or computer accounts. you can deploy software to users via group policy.

    so as you can see, Active Directory is a complicated mechanism that isn't covered under a white paper, rather is covered in a book.

    Microsoft Technet is a great resource

    here is a link for Technet on DNS
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/technologies/featured/dns/default.mspx

    This is a link for Active Directory concepts on Technet

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/77a19ae8-bffe-42ca-a841-3d18ea62dc9b1033.mspx

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    CG IT

    if your starting over, install Windows Server 2003. apply SP1 and get all the updates from the Window Update site before proceeding in creating your Domain Controller [DC]. If your creating this domain controller as a test network to learn Active Directory services, choose a Class C addressing scheme for your server NIC. A suggestion would be to use 192.168.1.1 as the server address, subnet mask 255.255.255.0. When you setup DHCP, the address pool would be 192.168.1.2 - 253 subnet mask 255.255.255.0. that gives you 252 hosts [or workstations which can get addresses]. note: you do not have to install DHCP for Active Directory to work or function nor is it a basic configuration requirement. you can install DHCP after the server becomes a DC.

    once your server has basic configurations completed, you can dcpromo promote it to a domain controller.

    here's a Technet link on how to create a DC on a Windows 2003 server using dcpromo promote and the Active Directory wizard.

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/87e58caa-b7f1-4c72-9c5c-b478aa53fc361033.mspx

    In choosing a domain name to use, I recommend using the .local extension rather than the public .com/net/org.

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    CG IT

    once you have your server promoted to a Domain controller you then need to join workstations to the domain.

    here is a technet article on joining a domain.

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/7207aa3e-d95d-4176-a1ca-bc629f1ca6981033.mspx

    here's a small troubleshooting Technet article. Small but....

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/2b0efdba-33e4-432d-a284-fd56a5db4c6a1033.mspx

    note: you should have your domain controller connected to a switch and your workstations also connect to the switch. you can join workstations to the domain the same way you join it to a workgroup. here's a technet article on that

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/f/?en/library/156d7205-0032-4116-8fb6-c4fd4342ba571033.mspx

    the only difference is that you would specify a domain rather than a workgroup. when you specify the domain name and click ok, you'll be prompted to provide credential to join the computer to the domain. user the administrators account user name and password.

    the workstation will then try to contact the server [Active Directory] to authenticate the user name and password bu query of the DNS server. This appears to be where you had your problem. You had the loopback address 127.0.0.1 as your DNS server when in fact your DNS server's address is the domain controller address The loopback address is just an address [mechanism] for the host to send packets to itself for testing purposes. here's a webopedia on loopback address.

    http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/L/loopback_address.html

    I would recommend getting a book on IP addressing. TCP/IP for Dummies or TCP/IP Jump Start Internet protocol basics are good books for fundamental concepts of TCP/IP

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    CG IT

    here's a technet article on DHCP

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/technologies/dhcp.mspx

    as you can see there's lots of reading material.

    note: even when you install DHCP on the DC, it doesn't just start working. You have to must authorize the DHCP server, then activate it before it will work. see this technet paper
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/e24cbe2a-b9f4-412d-9a4a-1c085b2866f11033.mspx?mfr=true

    note: you don't have to install DHCP. you can use a static addressing scheme. If you want to learn DHCP then by all means install it, however, you can setup your client with a static address. If your server is IP address 192.168.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0, then you can assign the client an address in the same subnet such as 192.168.1.3 mask 255.255.255.0 dns server would be the DC [as when you installed Active Directory using dcpromo promote, the Active Directory wizard will automaticall install DNS [AD needs DNS to function] so, the client computer needs the DC server [which is also the DNS server]address [192.168.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0]

    So that's the quick and dirty, in a nutshell, creating an Active Directory Domain [creating a Doman Controller with DNs and Active Directory running on it].

    For security best practices, there are also articles on Technet.

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    mandocia

    Ok, I have reinstalled Windows Server 2003. I installed the correct drivers, and updated in windows update.

    I set my server's IP Address to 192.168.1.4, because my router is 192.168.1.3, and I felt that was a good area to begin. Also, my router is a DHCP server that assigns address from .100 to .199.

    Both clients are connected to the router, as well as the server.

    I installed Active Directory and choose daminious.local as my domain name. I had the program install the DNS server automatically.

    Once done, I rebooted and set my server's NIC's DNS to 192.168.1.4. I went to my client PC and added in the DNS of 192.168.1.4.

    I went to connect to a domain and then I got a request for a username and password. I put in Administrator, then the password. The following is the result:

    "The following error occured attempting to join the domain "daminious.local"

    The format of the specified network name is invalid"

    I also changed my client's name and made it less then 8 characters, no spaces, which is MDPBook. Same result.

    Thus, I am having the same error as always. I must be doing something wrong someplace.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    should give you an error # like 1212 or 1616.

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    mandocia

    There was no error code given, a popup window titled Computer Name changes appears, and says:

    "The following error occurred attempting to join the domain "daminious.local":

    The format of the specific network name is invalid.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/w2000Msgs/3855.mspx?mfr=true

    User Action:

    If you have a user interface in the application, reenter the network name. A network name can have up to 15 characters and cannot include spaces.


    http://www.braingia.org/webnotes/index.php?p=111&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1

    though this involved windows vista, the problem resided on the W2003 Server. The fix was to rename the host. However, your doing a reinstall so you wouldn't have any residule host names floating around.

    what name and netbios name did you give the server? usually the server name is like server1 or server01. the netbios name could be an abbreviation of the domain name. DAMI or something like that. The restrictions of the # of characters is 15 and there can be no spaces. best not to use special characters

    this is the best I can do as far as suggestions and providing links to resources .

    I saw on your other thread that you tried NSLOOKUP and you could not resovle the server name or even the address to the domain name. that indicates a DNS problem.

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    mandocia

    I started over, yet again, time time I installed the DNS server first then installed Active Directory.

    When I installed active directory, it found my DNS server and installed correctly.

    I am even able to ping my dns address and get a result, so it seems DNS is working.

    This time on the client machine I used the Network Identification Wizard, within it I got to the screen where you put in your username, password, and domain. When I did it told me it found a username matching what I put in, but for the daminious domain, not the daminious.local

    When I tried that, I got DNS errors because DNS is looking for Daminious.local.

    Daminious is the NETBIOS name, so I am wondering if the server is being confused.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    in the event viewer?

    try nslookup and see what is returned from the DC.

    if you successfully joined the workstation to the domain and rebooted, then tried to log in to the domain with the workstation, what happened?

    one of the benefits of having problems and doing setups multiple times is it's a learning experience.

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    mandocia

    When I go to nslookup on the client PC, I get the following:

    Default Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    when I type in mdpserver001.daminious.local, I get the following:

    Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    DNS request timed out.
    timeout was 2 seconds.
    Name: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    Now, when I am on the server and repeat the procedure, the following is the result:

    Default Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    When I type in mdpserver001.daminious.local I get the following:

    Server: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    Name: mdpserver001.daminious.local
    Address: 192.168.1.4

    Thus, I am getting the DNS error from the client machine, but not the server.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    you can do a test on your DNS server [your domain controller which hosts DNS] to check your forward and reverse lookup zones.

    here's a link to Technet article on doing a simple query and a recursive query on your DNS server.

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/f32dee24-aacd-4909-a674-182df5c624fd1033.mspx?mfr=true

    You did not specify if you created a reverse lookup zone therefore if you did not when you try an nslookup using the address, your dns server will time out [no reverse lookup zone configured].

    try the DNS query test on your DNS server.

    let us know the results

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    mandocia

    Ok, I have been looking at my DNS settings and testing them with nslookup. When I try nslookup from my server, it works fine, but if I try with the client I get the following error:

    mdpserver001.daminious.local can't find mdpserver001.daminious.local: Non-existent domain

    I went into the DNS control panel and did a simple query and a recursive query, both passed.

    I have been reading the nslookup error is because of a reverse lookup zone not existing. I did create one, and it has a pointer record that says 192.168.1.4, but I still get the error.

    I also found the nltest utility and was able to see my domain controller on the server, so I am thinking it is a DNS problem.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    for AD to function. you actually don't need a reverse lookup zone. NS lookup ip to name might not work but it doesn't mean your DNS server is faulty. All you need is resource records that say <your domain>.local is IP address such and such so that when you enter a name it resolves to an address.

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    mandocia

    Well, all I know now is no matter what I try it refuses to work. I can ping the dns server and it connects, my tests work, I can see the domain controller.

    I have even removed and reinstalled my network cards thinking that was the issue, nothing changed.

    I have formatted my server and repeated most of these steps many times, I always get the same error: the format of the specified network name is invalid.

    Maybe my equipment cannot handle this or some other issue. My network is on a linksys router, WRT54G, with 4 ports. The server and 1 client is physically connected to it, and one client has wireless connected to it.

    My server is a 1.8gig athlon xp with 765 megs of memory, one client is a duel core athlon 2 gig with 1 gig ram, the other is a single core athlon 2 gig 512 ram notebook.

    I have been looking on the web for help, but nothing works. Is it also possible this is because this is an evaluation version of windows server 2003? Maybe you cannot connect to a domain with it, but then, it would be useless.

    Right now I am lost, I have worked on this for 40 hours so far and nothing, I am wondering if it is possible for me to do with my current skill level.

    Daminious

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    CG IT

    so when you try to join your XP workstation to the domain using the network wizard you get an error format of specified network name is invalid?

    what is the name of the XP machine?

    The switch on the router shouldn't interfer with network communications.

    here's something to try. log on to the server with the administrators account. open up active directory users and computer from the administrative tools. create a computer account in the computers OU for your XP workstation using some generic name like Workstation1 or WS1 or whatever. then rename the XP machine to that name. reboot. run the network identification wizard. See what happens.

    the only way to learn is to practice and if you have to read all the documentation and install 50 times, it's well worth the experience.

    Get the Microsoft Press books [Windows Server 2003]Self paced training book for Exam 70-291 as a beginning reference. Has hands step by step practice for installing Windows Server 2003 and goes on with DNS and DHCP.

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    Jacky Howe

    has to start somewhere. Some of us have been there before. Can you go to the client and at a cmd prompt type in ipconfig and let us know the addresses.

    Rob

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    VirginiaBeachBum

    Mastering windows server 2003-Mark Manasi.
    That's how I got my Domain/AD/DNS/DHCP up and running.

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    mandocia

    I have found and fixed the problem.

    As sad, and as annoyed most of you will be, the problem was my poor choice in software.

    In other words, I used a fixed version of 2003 server. I was using a version that was cracked to give a year instead of 6 months. I felt that would give me enough time to really learn it.

    I decided today that may be the problem, and got the official software from microsoft. It worked without any problems at all. I was able to join the domain, and now I can learn the system and how to build it.

    Thus, the moral of the story is: if you want to waste 40-50 hours of your time and be a moron while doing so, use a cracked version. If you want to be smart and do it right, use the official one.

    Daminious

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    mgibbs

    I have setup an entire School without knowing all the ends and outs based upon a single guide book. Windows Server 2003-Administrator's Pocket Consultant. The ISBN# 978-0-7356-2245-6 for around $30.00 US Dollars should give you a great start.
    It is one of the fews things that Microsoft did right!!! Specifically, Chapter 4 seems very helpful...My environment is Windows 2003 R2 Server with Windows XP professional Clients. I have a basic desktop policy and a VB Script that maps network drives and my network printer all running through AD(Active Directory).The book explains in great detail DNS/WINS/DHCP/IPSEC setups.
    Hope this information helps..It did for me.

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    asim.zafir

    Hi,

    We had some issues with our dhcp server running in the enterprise environment. To make it long story short, in order to trouble shoot it effectively we decided to take the dhcp server (was going through several security issues) off the network and wanted to run some test.

    while we took it offline, we ran into issues of dhcp server not authorizing to Active Directory Domain Controller (as it was off production). we promoted the server to Domain Contoller using dcpromo - while that processes ended and the system rebooted, it appeared that i was not able to login through my local password that was initially created on the server? Now we can't get into the server as it refuses the password - any clue what might have gone wrong?

    AZ