Questions

Windows XP problems with both new and old drives related to cloning.

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Windows XP problems with both new and old drives related to cloning.

jbarrington
I really messed up, and now I would like to see if I can correct it some how.

First, the computer has WinXP Pro on it, and I cloned a smaller drive onto a larger one.

Everything with the cloning process seemed to go fine, but I soon realized that I had two problems. One problem was realized as soon as I did it, and the second problem wasn?t realized until after the first one was realized.

After cloning, I was called away, and when I came back, I started the computer with the newly cloned drive, and everything seemed fine. However, I realized that the new drive was showing two different capacities. When I would right click onto the drives properties, I would see the capacity of the old drive. When I would go into the administrative tools and look in the computer management tools for the disk tools, I saw in one area that it was showing the drives true capacity and in another area it showed the erroneous old capacity. It was also during that time that I saw that I hadn?t removed the old drive, but I didn?t think much about it until I decided to switch back to the old drive.

I disconnected the new drive and tried to boot from the old one. As soon as I had gotten into windows I realized that I had a problem with the old drive. It seems that it will go all the way up to the point to just before you can select which user to log on with. In other words, it goes through the Microsoft progress bar screen and then through the graphical light blue windows graphical screen stuff, but it stops just before it gets to the graphical list of users that can be selected for logging onto the computer. I tried this several times and got the same results. I even tried to get on using the safe mode and I still received the same results.

I?m not sure if the old drives registry was changed or modified when the computer was booted from the new drive, or what.

As far as my second problem, I would like it to show the correct capacity and feel it?s something within the windows registry is storing the old drive?s capacity information and keeps referring to it, and any true capacity information for the drive is gathered directly from the BIOS or the drive its self.

Anyway, what I?m ultimately after is to correct both problems, but I would settle for one of them to be corrected.

Thanks in advance, and I hope that I was clear with my problems.
  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Will it boot with the new drive only?

    Windows reads the disk partition information from the disk, and nothing but the disk.

    What tool did you use to clone the drives?

    The first concern would be if the disk partition were corrupt.

    Are these IDE drives?

    Are they jumpered as primary and slave?

    Using 80wire IDE cable?

    How old is this PC?

    Bios current?

    Reset/defaulted the bios?

    If windows fails to load, my guess would be that something in the registry got hosed.

    To fix that you can do an in-place reinstall of XP, or go into recovery console and try the various fixboot, fixmbr, commands....

    But first make sure that Bios detects it correctly, and that you have reset the bios.

    There is also the possibility that the old drive has picked this time to die.

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    0 Votes
    jbarrington

    Apologies for taking a long time to reply back.

    Your questions:
    1. Will it boot with the new drive only?

    It will boot with either.

    2. Windows reads the disk partition information from the disk, and nothing but the disk.

    I?m not sure how to answer this one since it can boot from both.

    3. What tool did you use to clone the drives?

    Clonezilla.

    4. The first concern would be if the disk partition were corrupt.

    The cloning software could have, but my gut feeling that it has to do with windows and the registry.

    5. Are these IDE drives?

    The older one is an IDE. The newer one is SATA.

    6. Are they jumpered as primary and slave?

    No. Everything is selected within the BIOS since the newer is a SATA.

    7. Using 80wire IDE cable?

    40.

    8. How old is this PC?

    4yrs.

    9. Bios current?

    No, but I strongly feel this isn?t the issue.

    10. Reset/defaulted the bios?

    I strongly feel that I don?t need to reset.

    11. If windows fails to load, my guess would be that something in the registry got hosed.

    This is the area where I feel that something could have became changed or deleted. I strongly feel the registry is ok in the old drive, but I feel the windows in the new drive made some sort of change in the old drive to where it can?t finish the boot, when I accidentally left the old drive in the computer when I booted from the new drive.

    Since you can?t have two ?C? drives in the same computer, I feel that the new hard drive did something to the old hard drive while I was in windows. I could access the old drive and see files on it from windows explorer. I can?t help but feel that the windows on the new drive saw the old drive changed some sort of drive reference somewhere on it, or deleted some important key files somewhere within the old drives window?s directory that prevents it from fully booting into windows.

    When I removed the new drive and tried to boot from the old drive, I can see certain boot screens like this example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_16.gif

    It will stop when it gets to a screen that looks very, very much like this next example screen below, except, of course, it doesn?t say ?Applying Computer Settings? like the example does. It was the only screen of this type that I could find on the web that looks close:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_37.gif

    I will never reach the log-in screen like this next example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_36.gif


    12. To fix that you can do an in-place reinstall of XP, or go into recovery console and try the various fixboot, fixmbr, commands....

    I?ve tried the recovery items that you mentioned, but I haven?t performed a re-install. I?m really trying to avoid any re-installation.

    13. There is also the possibility that the old drive has picked this time to die.

    Neither drive is dead.


    Again, I can?t help but feel that the windows on the new drive saw the old drive changed, or deleted some important key files somewhere within the old drives window?s directory somewhere that prevents it from fully booting into windows.

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    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    What OS is in use here?

    What did you use to Clone the HDD With?

    The easy thing here if the old drive was smaller than the new one is to go into Drive Management right click on the unused part of the Capacity Shown and format it this will give you a second Partition with the remainder of the Drive on it to use.

    If you want this all in one partition you need to clone the Drive again but this time telling the Clone Process to use all of the available space on the new HDD.

    As to why the old Drive is not booting any longer you need to tell us what you used to clone the Drive with, if this drive was disconnected after the clone process was finished and so on.

    Normally with the Commercial Cloning Software no changes are made to the Source Drive but if they are IDE Type then a Jumpering Issue will be present which may prevent the Old Drive from Booting. If the Old Drive was not disconnected and the system booted off the new drive it is possible that some changes have been made to it but without knowing what has been done here and with what it's very hard to guess what to suggest other than Repairing the OS install.

    Col

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    0 Votes
    jbarrington

    First of all, thanks for the reply.

    1. What OS is in use here?

    Not sure what you may have meant here, since I already stated that I?m using Windows XP Pro in my original post. Did you mean to ask me something else here?

    2. What did you use to Clone the HDD With?

    Since I rarely have need to clone a drive, I tried to use one of the more respected open source programs. ClonZilla.

    3. The easy thing here if the old drive was smaller than the new one is to go into Drive Management right click on the unused part of the Capacity Shown and format it this will give you a second Partition with the remainder of the Drive on it to use.

    That?s a problem. In the drive management area, it only shows the drive as being the same capacity as the old drive (160gb). However, at the top of the drive management, it can also see that the new drive is 600gb.

    4. If you want this all in one partition you need to clone the Drive again but this time telling the Clone Process to use all of the available space on the new HDD.

    I hear you, but I was certain that I indicated to the software that I wanted to use the entire drive.

    5. As to why the old Drive is not booting any longer you need to tell us what you used to clone the Drive with, if this drive was disconnected after the clone process was finished and so on.

    I made the serious ?No-No? mistake of booting up with using the new drive while the old drive was still connected. The new drive booted perfectly except for showing the same capacity as the old. I strongly feel that the windows on the new drive saw the old drive and changed something somewhere, or deleted some important key files somewhere within the old drives window?s directory that prevents it from fully booting into windows.

    The old drive does boot into windows, but it stops just before it reaches the point where you can log-on.

    When I removed the new drive and then tried to boot from the old drive, I can see certain boot screens like this example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_16.gif

    It will stop when it gets to a screen that looks very, very much like this next example screen below, except, of course, it doesn?t say ?Applying Computer Settings? like the example does. It was the only screen of this type that I could find on the web that looks close:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_37.gif

    I will never reach the log-in screen like this next example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_36.gif

    That?s my problem.

    7. If the Old Drive was not disconnected and the system booted off the new drive it is possible that some changes have been made to it but without knowing what has been done here and with what it's very hard to guess what to suggest other than Repairing the OS install.

    Again, this is where I feel that something happened.

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    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    The Old drive was a IDE and the new drive is a SATA and the computer is 4 years old so I don't think that the BIOS Supports the SATA Option Natively. It may very well support SATA Drives but you will need to apply the SATA Driver to the Windows Installer when the first Blue Screen appears by pressing the F6 Key and waiting till you are prompted to insert a floppy with the SATA Driver though Windows will say something about SCSI or RAID Drivers.

    Ideally the SATA Drive should boot correctly if the IDE Drive is connected but it is possible that the SATA Drive isn't running at all or even visible to Windows if this M'Board requires the SATA Driver to be installed most of that age do require this so with both drives connected boot the system and open My Computer and see if you can see both drives. If you can not open the Drive Management and see what is actually present there and the Full Sizes of all of the HDD present.

    As you still appear to have your Data Intact I would suggest making a Slipstreamed Install Disc with nLite available free from here

    http://www.nliteos.com/download.html

    Just be sure to read the instructions on the above Web Site listed under the Guides heading. Include the SATA Driver for this M'Board and XP and any other drivers that are required especially any Sound Drivers if they are Realtech. You can include SP2 if you have the Original Version of XP and have a HDD bigger than 127 MEG as the older versions of XP will not correctly recognize any Partition Size bigger than somewhere around the 127 MEG Mark.

    When you have XP installed to the SATA Drive plug the original Drive into a USB Enclosure and plug that in and read your Data off that. If you had a password and made your Files Private you'll need to Take Ownership of them by following the directions here

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308421

    And do not forget your Address Book and E-Mail.

    Col

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    0 Votes
    jbarrington

    The motherboard has four SATA connectors and the BIOS fully supports SATA. The BIOS also supports the large drive.

    I strongly feel my issues do not surround the hardware, but center with windows.

    Let me restate my two problems.

    I feel my two issues were caused by what Clonzilla did (or didn't do), and what I mistakenly did with rebooting my computer with two "C" drives.

    PROBLEM ONE:
    Clonzilla screwed-up the image on my larger drive to where windows see it as smaller. The drive works, but only shows the same older drive size through windows. Outside of windows, it shows it's normal size. I can't try to try recloning again because of problem number two.

    PROBLEM TWO:
    They say that you should disconnect one of the drives after cloning to prevent problems. Well, I didn't do this. I screwed-up my older, smaller drive by keeping it connected. The windows on the SATA evidently changed a setting on the older original drive, or deleted something.

    If I can figure out what was changed or deleted on the original smaller drive, then I could start it and then use a commercial cloning software to get the newer drive working correctly.

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    So here the BIOS Shows the SATA Driver as a IDE Drive int he General Headings and lists it as something like IDE forth Master or Slave as the actual Drive here does it.

    if it does then the M'Board natively supports SATA Drives but if it doesn't show the SATA Drive this way it doesn't Natively support SATA Drives. It supports SATA Drives through the application of a SATA or RAID Driver when you install the OS. If it Natively Supports SATA Drives you need to connect the SATA Drive tot he 0 or 1 SATA Connector not any other. You should always connect the Primary Boot Drive to the lowest Number Connector that the M'Board has listed. Look in the M'Board Manual for which SATA Connector is which. I had to reset a Customers ASUS M'Board earlier today to do this so it would boot to the stage where I could Install Windows. It does natively support SAT Drives but not when they are on the Number 4 SATA Connector you can not boot from that Drive.

    Now for your Corrupt Windows Install on the IDE Drive you need to do a Repair Install with a M$ Branded Install Disc not a System Makers Recovery Disc as this option Is Not Supported by the majority of Recovery Disc's.

    Just follow the directions listed on M$ Knowledge Base Article here

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341

    Teh important bit is this but you should read the entire Notice

    Prerequisites
    Windows Installation CD
    Before you start, have your Windows installation CD and the product key available. Without these, you cannot reinstall Windows. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, contact the computer manufacturer for help in obtaining the Windows installation files and product key.
    Device drivers
    Many of the device drivers for your hardware components are integrated into Windows. However, devices such as printers, monitors, graphic cards, sound cards, modems, external drives, and scanners usually have separate installation CDs. If you do not have all the drivers for your hardware components, you can download the drivers from the Internet and then write them to a CD.

    If your computer requires a third-party mass storage device driver or hardware abstraction layer (HAL), make sure that you have a copy of the files on a separate storage media before you start the reinstallation.
    Internet Explorer 7
    If Internet Explorer 7 is installed on your computer, you must uninstall it before you reinstall Windows XP. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    917964 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/917964/ ) How to perform a repair installation of Windows XP if Internet Explorer 7 is installed
    Programs
    Collect and store the CDs and product keys for your programs in an appropriate location so that you can reinstall the programs after you have reinstalled Windows. These programs may include the following:
    Microsoft Office programs
    Antivirus software
    CD writing software
    Internet Provider software
    Data backup
    Before you reinstall Windows, back up all important data to another location. Data that you may want to back up could include the following:
    My Documents (documents, pictures, music, videos)
    Program folders (configuration data, user data)
    Favorites
    Address books
    E-mail messages
    Document templates
    Macros
    Boilerplates
    The original backup copies of your registry files (located in the %systemroot%\Repair folder) are replaced when the reinstallation is completed. These original registry files in the Repair folder were created either when you started Windows XP or when you last used the Backup utility to back up the system state. If you think that you might have to use the registry backups after the reinstallation is complete, copy these registry backup files to another location before you perform the reinstallation.
    Network settings
    You can restore certain network settings after you reinstall Windows. Before you start the reinstallation, record your computer's network settings so that they can easily be available if this step is required. These settings include the following:
    Computer name
    Workgroup or domain
    TCP/IP settings
    To find these settings, do the following steps:
    To find these settings, click Start and then click Run.
    Type control ncpa.cpl in the Open text field and then click OK.
    Right-click Local Area Connection and then right-click Properties.
    Record the network settings.
    Internet provider information
    To make sure that you can reconnect to the Internet after you have reinstalled Windows, record your Internet provider information. This includes user name, password information, and names of mail servers.
    Startup sequence
    Warning This procedure may involve changing your CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) settings and changing your Basic Input/Output System (BIOS). Incorrect changes to the BIOS of your computer can result in serious problems. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that result from changes to your BIOS can be solved. Change your CMOS settings at your own risk. Incorrect or corrupted CMOS and BIOS settings can cause startup problems or shutdown problems.

    If you must adjust the BIOS startup sequence of your computer so that it can start from the installation CD, the sequence should be in the following order:
    CD drive
    Hard disk
    Floppy disk drive
    During startup, BIOS searches for a disk that has an operating system it can load. On a computer that has an operating system installed, this is usually the hard disk. The BIOS is configured to search disks on the computer in a certain order, called the startup sequence. If the computer hard disk is configured in the BIOS as the first disk in the startup sequence, the computer starts by using the hard disk and does not search the CD drive for a startup disk.

    To configure the BIOS to search the CD drive for a startup disk before it searches the hard disk, follow these steps:
    Restart your computer.
    When the computer first starts, it performs the power-on self test (POST). This test checks that all connected devices are functioning. As part of the POST, the memory is checked. During the memory test, a message will appear that tells you how to access the BIOS. For example, you may see the following message or a similar message that explains how to start the BIOS setup:
    PRESS DEL TO ENTER SETUP
    In this example, you must press the DEL key immediately after the memory test is finished to start the setup process. You may have to press the key several times to make sure that you access the BIOS setup.

    Tip There are other keys that may provide access to the BIOS. They include the following:
    F1
    F2
    F10
    CTRL+ENTER
    ALT+ENTER
    CTRL+ALT+ESC
    CTRL+ALT+INSERT
    If you are not sure how to access the BIOS setup, see the user manual for your computer's motherboard.
    Look for the startup sequence settings (also known as boot sequence or boot order). You can usually use the arrow keys to move through the menus and settings.
    When you find the startup sequence setting, you can usually press ENTER to modify it. Press the PLUS SIGN (+) or MINUS SIGN (-) key until the CD drive is selected as the startup disk.

    Tip More information about how to modify the BIOS can be found in your user manual. It usually contains descriptions of the menus and instructions on how to modify the options. The BIOS itself usually contains context-sensitive Help with the individual steps.
    As soon as you have specified the CD drive as the first location to search for a startup disk, you can usually press ESC to return to the menus. In the main menu, select the option SAVE AND EXIT SETUP or a similar option. When the confirmation SAVE TO CMOS AND EXIT or a similar option appears, select YES.
    If you cannot select YES, type the letter y.

    Note BIOS uses a QWERTY keyboard layout. If your keyboard settings follow a different layout, you will have to press the Y key as it appears on a QWERTY keyboard.
    After you exit the BIOS setup, your computer will restart.
    Make sure that the computer starts by using the CD drive. Insert the Windows XP installation CD and restart the computer. If this is successful, you can start reinstalling Windows XP.


    Col

  • +
    0 Votes
    robo_dev

    Will it boot with the new drive only?

    Windows reads the disk partition information from the disk, and nothing but the disk.

    What tool did you use to clone the drives?

    The first concern would be if the disk partition were corrupt.

    Are these IDE drives?

    Are they jumpered as primary and slave?

    Using 80wire IDE cable?

    How old is this PC?

    Bios current?

    Reset/defaulted the bios?

    If windows fails to load, my guess would be that something in the registry got hosed.

    To fix that you can do an in-place reinstall of XP, or go into recovery console and try the various fixboot, fixmbr, commands....

    But first make sure that Bios detects it correctly, and that you have reset the bios.

    There is also the possibility that the old drive has picked this time to die.

    +
    0 Votes
    jbarrington

    Apologies for taking a long time to reply back.

    Your questions:
    1. Will it boot with the new drive only?

    It will boot with either.

    2. Windows reads the disk partition information from the disk, and nothing but the disk.

    I?m not sure how to answer this one since it can boot from both.

    3. What tool did you use to clone the drives?

    Clonezilla.

    4. The first concern would be if the disk partition were corrupt.

    The cloning software could have, but my gut feeling that it has to do with windows and the registry.

    5. Are these IDE drives?

    The older one is an IDE. The newer one is SATA.

    6. Are they jumpered as primary and slave?

    No. Everything is selected within the BIOS since the newer is a SATA.

    7. Using 80wire IDE cable?

    40.

    8. How old is this PC?

    4yrs.

    9. Bios current?

    No, but I strongly feel this isn?t the issue.

    10. Reset/defaulted the bios?

    I strongly feel that I don?t need to reset.

    11. If windows fails to load, my guess would be that something in the registry got hosed.

    This is the area where I feel that something could have became changed or deleted. I strongly feel the registry is ok in the old drive, but I feel the windows in the new drive made some sort of change in the old drive to where it can?t finish the boot, when I accidentally left the old drive in the computer when I booted from the new drive.

    Since you can?t have two ?C? drives in the same computer, I feel that the new hard drive did something to the old hard drive while I was in windows. I could access the old drive and see files on it from windows explorer. I can?t help but feel that the windows on the new drive saw the old drive changed some sort of drive reference somewhere on it, or deleted some important key files somewhere within the old drives window?s directory that prevents it from fully booting into windows.

    When I removed the new drive and tried to boot from the old drive, I can see certain boot screens like this example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_16.gif

    It will stop when it gets to a screen that looks very, very much like this next example screen below, except, of course, it doesn?t say ?Applying Computer Settings? like the example does. It was the only screen of this type that I could find on the web that looks close:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_37.gif

    I will never reach the log-in screen like this next example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_36.gif


    12. To fix that you can do an in-place reinstall of XP, or go into recovery console and try the various fixboot, fixmbr, commands....

    I?ve tried the recovery items that you mentioned, but I haven?t performed a re-install. I?m really trying to avoid any re-installation.

    13. There is also the possibility that the old drive has picked this time to die.

    Neither drive is dead.


    Again, I can?t help but feel that the windows on the new drive saw the old drive changed, or deleted some important key files somewhere within the old drives window?s directory somewhere that prevents it from fully booting into windows.

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    What OS is in use here?

    What did you use to Clone the HDD With?

    The easy thing here if the old drive was smaller than the new one is to go into Drive Management right click on the unused part of the Capacity Shown and format it this will give you a second Partition with the remainder of the Drive on it to use.

    If you want this all in one partition you need to clone the Drive again but this time telling the Clone Process to use all of the available space on the new HDD.

    As to why the old Drive is not booting any longer you need to tell us what you used to clone the Drive with, if this drive was disconnected after the clone process was finished and so on.

    Normally with the Commercial Cloning Software no changes are made to the Source Drive but if they are IDE Type then a Jumpering Issue will be present which may prevent the Old Drive from Booting. If the Old Drive was not disconnected and the system booted off the new drive it is possible that some changes have been made to it but without knowing what has been done here and with what it's very hard to guess what to suggest other than Repairing the OS install.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    jbarrington

    First of all, thanks for the reply.

    1. What OS is in use here?

    Not sure what you may have meant here, since I already stated that I?m using Windows XP Pro in my original post. Did you mean to ask me something else here?

    2. What did you use to Clone the HDD With?

    Since I rarely have need to clone a drive, I tried to use one of the more respected open source programs. ClonZilla.

    3. The easy thing here if the old drive was smaller than the new one is to go into Drive Management right click on the unused part of the Capacity Shown and format it this will give you a second Partition with the remainder of the Drive on it to use.

    That?s a problem. In the drive management area, it only shows the drive as being the same capacity as the old drive (160gb). However, at the top of the drive management, it can also see that the new drive is 600gb.

    4. If you want this all in one partition you need to clone the Drive again but this time telling the Clone Process to use all of the available space on the new HDD.

    I hear you, but I was certain that I indicated to the software that I wanted to use the entire drive.

    5. As to why the old Drive is not booting any longer you need to tell us what you used to clone the Drive with, if this drive was disconnected after the clone process was finished and so on.

    I made the serious ?No-No? mistake of booting up with using the new drive while the old drive was still connected. The new drive booted perfectly except for showing the same capacity as the old. I strongly feel that the windows on the new drive saw the old drive and changed something somewhere, or deleted some important key files somewhere within the old drives window?s directory that prevents it from fully booting into windows.

    The old drive does boot into windows, but it stops just before it reaches the point where you can log-on.

    When I removed the new drive and then tried to boot from the old drive, I can see certain boot screens like this example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_16.gif

    It will stop when it gets to a screen that looks very, very much like this next example screen below, except, of course, it doesn?t say ?Applying Computer Settings? like the example does. It was the only screen of this type that I could find on the web that looks close:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_37.gif

    I will never reach the log-in screen like this next example:

    http://www.questwork.com/questcms/images/common/questhelp/windows/winxp_36.gif

    That?s my problem.

    7. If the Old Drive was not disconnected and the system booted off the new drive it is possible that some changes have been made to it but without knowing what has been done here and with what it's very hard to guess what to suggest other than Repairing the OS install.

    Again, this is where I feel that something happened.

    +
    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    The Old drive was a IDE and the new drive is a SATA and the computer is 4 years old so I don't think that the BIOS Supports the SATA Option Natively. It may very well support SATA Drives but you will need to apply the SATA Driver to the Windows Installer when the first Blue Screen appears by pressing the F6 Key and waiting till you are prompted to insert a floppy with the SATA Driver though Windows will say something about SCSI or RAID Drivers.

    Ideally the SATA Drive should boot correctly if the IDE Drive is connected but it is possible that the SATA Drive isn't running at all or even visible to Windows if this M'Board requires the SATA Driver to be installed most of that age do require this so with both drives connected boot the system and open My Computer and see if you can see both drives. If you can not open the Drive Management and see what is actually present there and the Full Sizes of all of the HDD present.

    As you still appear to have your Data Intact I would suggest making a Slipstreamed Install Disc with nLite available free from here

    http://www.nliteos.com/download.html

    Just be sure to read the instructions on the above Web Site listed under the Guides heading. Include the SATA Driver for this M'Board and XP and any other drivers that are required especially any Sound Drivers if they are Realtech. You can include SP2 if you have the Original Version of XP and have a HDD bigger than 127 MEG as the older versions of XP will not correctly recognize any Partition Size bigger than somewhere around the 127 MEG Mark.

    When you have XP installed to the SATA Drive plug the original Drive into a USB Enclosure and plug that in and read your Data off that. If you had a password and made your Files Private you'll need to Take Ownership of them by following the directions here

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308421

    And do not forget your Address Book and E-Mail.

    Col

    +
    0 Votes
    jbarrington

    The motherboard has four SATA connectors and the BIOS fully supports SATA. The BIOS also supports the large drive.

    I strongly feel my issues do not surround the hardware, but center with windows.

    Let me restate my two problems.

    I feel my two issues were caused by what Clonzilla did (or didn't do), and what I mistakenly did with rebooting my computer with two "C" drives.

    PROBLEM ONE:
    Clonzilla screwed-up the image on my larger drive to where windows see it as smaller. The drive works, but only shows the same older drive size through windows. Outside of windows, it shows it's normal size. I can't try to try recloning again because of problem number two.

    PROBLEM TWO:
    They say that you should disconnect one of the drives after cloning to prevent problems. Well, I didn't do this. I screwed-up my older, smaller drive by keeping it connected. The windows on the SATA evidently changed a setting on the older original drive, or deleted something.

    If I can figure out what was changed or deleted on the original smaller drive, then I could start it and then use a commercial cloning software to get the newer drive working correctly.

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    0 Votes
    OH Smeg

    So here the BIOS Shows the SATA Driver as a IDE Drive int he General Headings and lists it as something like IDE forth Master or Slave as the actual Drive here does it.

    if it does then the M'Board natively supports SATA Drives but if it doesn't show the SATA Drive this way it doesn't Natively support SATA Drives. It supports SATA Drives through the application of a SATA or RAID Driver when you install the OS. If it Natively Supports SATA Drives you need to connect the SATA Drive tot he 0 or 1 SATA Connector not any other. You should always connect the Primary Boot Drive to the lowest Number Connector that the M'Board has listed. Look in the M'Board Manual for which SATA Connector is which. I had to reset a Customers ASUS M'Board earlier today to do this so it would boot to the stage where I could Install Windows. It does natively support SAT Drives but not when they are on the Number 4 SATA Connector you can not boot from that Drive.

    Now for your Corrupt Windows Install on the IDE Drive you need to do a Repair Install with a M$ Branded Install Disc not a System Makers Recovery Disc as this option Is Not Supported by the majority of Recovery Disc's.

    Just follow the directions listed on M$ Knowledge Base Article here

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341

    Teh important bit is this but you should read the entire Notice

    Prerequisites
    Windows Installation CD
    Before you start, have your Windows installation CD and the product key available. Without these, you cannot reinstall Windows. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, contact the computer manufacturer for help in obtaining the Windows installation files and product key.
    Device drivers
    Many of the device drivers for your hardware components are integrated into Windows. However, devices such as printers, monitors, graphic cards, sound cards, modems, external drives, and scanners usually have separate installation CDs. If you do not have all the drivers for your hardware components, you can download the drivers from the Internet and then write them to a CD.

    If your computer requires a third-party mass storage device driver or hardware abstraction layer (HAL), make sure that you have a copy of the files on a separate storage media before you start the reinstallation.
    Internet Explorer 7
    If Internet Explorer 7 is installed on your computer, you must uninstall it before you reinstall Windows XP. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    917964 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/917964/ ) How to perform a repair installation of Windows XP if Internet Explorer 7 is installed
    Programs
    Collect and store the CDs and product keys for your programs in an appropriate location so that you can reinstall the programs after you have reinstalled Windows. These programs may include the following:
    Microsoft Office programs
    Antivirus software
    CD writing software
    Internet Provider software
    Data backup
    Before you reinstall Windows, back up all important data to another location. Data that you may want to back up could include the following:
    My Documents (documents, pictures, music, videos)
    Program folders (configuration data, user data)
    Favorites
    Address books
    E-mail messages
    Document templates
    Macros
    Boilerplates
    The original backup copies of your registry files (located in the %systemroot%\Repair folder) are replaced when the reinstallation is completed. These original registry files in the Repair folder were created either when you started Windows XP or when you last used the Backup utility to back up the system state. If you think that you might have to use the registry backups after the reinstallation is complete, copy these registry backup files to another location before you perform the reinstallation.
    Network settings
    You can restore certain network settings after you reinstall Windows. Before you start the reinstallation, record your computer's network settings so that they can easily be available if this step is required. These settings include the following:
    Computer name
    Workgroup or domain
    TCP/IP settings
    To find these settings, do the following steps:
    To find these settings, click Start and then click Run.
    Type control ncpa.cpl in the Open text field and then click OK.
    Right-click Local Area Connection and then right-click Properties.
    Record the network settings.
    Internet provider information
    To make sure that you can reconnect to the Internet after you have reinstalled Windows, record your Internet provider information. This includes user name, password information, and names of mail servers.
    Startup sequence
    Warning This procedure may involve changing your CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) settings and changing your Basic Input/Output System (BIOS). Incorrect changes to the BIOS of your computer can result in serious problems. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that result from changes to your BIOS can be solved. Change your CMOS settings at your own risk. Incorrect or corrupted CMOS and BIOS settings can cause startup problems or shutdown problems.

    If you must adjust the BIOS startup sequence of your computer so that it can start from the installation CD, the sequence should be in the following order:
    CD drive
    Hard disk
    Floppy disk drive
    During startup, BIOS searches for a disk that has an operating system it can load. On a computer that has an operating system installed, this is usually the hard disk. The BIOS is configured to search disks on the computer in a certain order, called the startup sequence. If the computer hard disk is configured in the BIOS as the first disk in the startup sequence, the computer starts by using the hard disk and does not search the CD drive for a startup disk.

    To configure the BIOS to search the CD drive for a startup disk before it searches the hard disk, follow these steps:
    Restart your computer.
    When the computer first starts, it performs the power-on self test (POST). This test checks that all connected devices are functioning. As part of the POST, the memory is checked. During the memory test, a message will appear that tells you how to access the BIOS. For example, you may see the following message or a similar message that explains how to start the BIOS setup:
    PRESS DEL TO ENTER SETUP
    In this example, you must press the DEL key immediately after the memory test is finished to start the setup process. You may have to press the key several times to make sure that you access the BIOS setup.

    Tip There are other keys that may provide access to the BIOS. They include the following:
    F1
    F2
    F10
    CTRL+ENTER
    ALT+ENTER
    CTRL+ALT+ESC
    CTRL+ALT+INSERT
    If you are not sure how to access the BIOS setup, see the user manual for your computer's motherboard.
    Look for the startup sequence settings (also known as boot sequence or boot order). You can usually use the arrow keys to move through the menus and settings.
    When you find the startup sequence setting, you can usually press ENTER to modify it. Press the PLUS SIGN (+) or MINUS SIGN (-) key until the CD drive is selected as the startup disk.

    Tip More information about how to modify the BIOS can be found in your user manual. It usually contains descriptions of the menus and instructions on how to modify the options. The BIOS itself usually contains context-sensitive Help with the individual steps.
    As soon as you have specified the CD drive as the first location to search for a startup disk, you can usually press ESC to return to the menus. In the main menu, select the option SAVE AND EXIT SETUP or a similar option. When the confirmation SAVE TO CMOS AND EXIT or a similar option appears, select YES.
    If you cannot select YES, type the letter y.

    Note BIOS uses a QWERTY keyboard layout. If your keyboard settings follow a different layout, you will have to press the Y key as it appears on a QWERTY keyboard.
    After you exit the BIOS setup, your computer will restart.
    Make sure that the computer starts by using the CD drive. Insert the Windows XP installation CD and restart the computer. If this is successful, you can start reinstalling Windows XP.


    Col