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windows xp repair nightmare. Please help

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windows xp repair nightmare. Please help

ernest_cheng
Hi,
Please help as i am out of ideas. I'm working on an IBM R32 laptop running xp pro. It was constantly freezing so i ran the repair option off the install disk. After the first reboot following the copy of the files from the disk, it crashed with an 0x7e bsod. I tried to enter safemode but it wont allow it because it still wants to continue the installation setup and wont let safemode run. (I suspect the video driver is the problem and want to update it under safemode). Is there a way i can stop the continuation of the setup process? I've tried enabling VGA and using the last known good configuration but neither worked. Can i do a restore from the dos prompt? And is there an easy way to replace the video driver from the dos prompt? I've tried using the recovery console using bootcfg /rebuild with no success. I'm not too familiar with the recovery console so i'm not sure what else i should try. Please help. I can provide additional information along with what else i've tried (can't remember, too many), if neccessary.
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    zlitocook

    Like UBCD, BartPE or others they run in memory not the hard drive. They will let you have access to the NTFS to fix, add or run spyware ect. Put the new video driver on CD or a USB key and try to install it from there.

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    ernest_cheng

    Will i need to edit the boot.ini file or anything? Is it as easy as just copying the new driver into the system32 folder? Thanks for helping, greatly appreciated.

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    BudhaScott

    You took just about the worst course of action to 'fix' the problem, short of a format. The problem was most likely spyware, or some sort of malware or other software problem that could have been easily corrected.

    Well, tell us anything else, such as filename or driver, that shows up as causing the 0x7E BSOD. In some situations, you should choose the blue pill.

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    ernest_cheng

    I did try using Norton's emergency repair tool (NED) to boot and scan the laptop but it didn't find anything. Do you think NED's just not detecting it? I still suspect an incorrect display driver is at fault. Anyway, the BSOD only listed the codes. No filenames or driver names given. (it wouldn't be Microsoft if it did) The codes listed are as follow: 0x0000007E (0xc000005, 0x8050D06C, 0xF898DA80, 0xF898D780)

    And i do appreciate your help.

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    ernest_cheng

    I did try using Norton's emergency repair tool (NED) to boot and scan the laptop but it didn't find anything. Do you think NED's just not detecting it? I still suspect an incorrect display driver is at fault. Anyway, the BSOD only listed the codes. No filenames or driver names given. (it wouldn't be Microsoft if it did) The codes listed are as follow: 0x0000007E (0xc000005, 0x8050D06C, 0xF898DA80, 0xF898D780)

    And i do appreciate your help.

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    holmescd

    I just realized how old this thread is, and that you've probably already resolved your issue one way or another.

    But anyway, I tend to agree with BudhaScott's analysis that the problem causing the slowdown was probably malware of some sort, and that sometimes you should just take the blue pill (format the drive and reinstall the OS).

    Since the system is already hosed up, the best recourse (IMHO) would be to backup the files on the drive if the user can't live without them, and reformat the drive (not the quick method) and reinstall Windows. This will likely give you the best bang for your buck, or in this case the best return on your time investment. That way you are pretty well assured that the system will be as stable as it can ever get when you're done with it.

    Regarding malware, no one program will ever find/remove it all, you need a "suite" of utilities to handle different types of malware. In addition to a good antivirus program my personal choices of free programs are:
    1. LavaSoft's AdAware (when licensing permits it's use)
    2. Spybot Search and Destroy
    3. SpywareBlaster
    4. AVG AntiSpyware (used to be called Ewido)
    5. A-Squared
    6. I used to use Giant AntiSpyware, but Microsoft bought it and now calls it Windows Defender. Since the new owners took charge this program has found few infections for me, and I sometimes don't even install it any more.

    Good luck!

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    dj_viper2020

    did you try reinstalling the OS that could fix the problem, but only if it comes down to that

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    zlitocook

    Like UBCD, BartPE or others they run in memory not the hard drive. They will let you have access to the NTFS to fix, add or run spyware ect. Put the new video driver on CD or a USB key and try to install it from there.

    +
    0 Votes
    ernest_cheng

    Will i need to edit the boot.ini file or anything? Is it as easy as just copying the new driver into the system32 folder? Thanks for helping, greatly appreciated.

    +
    0 Votes
    BudhaScott

    You took just about the worst course of action to 'fix' the problem, short of a format. The problem was most likely spyware, or some sort of malware or other software problem that could have been easily corrected.

    Well, tell us anything else, such as filename or driver, that shows up as causing the 0x7E BSOD. In some situations, you should choose the blue pill.

    +
    0 Votes
    ernest_cheng

    I did try using Norton's emergency repair tool (NED) to boot and scan the laptop but it didn't find anything. Do you think NED's just not detecting it? I still suspect an incorrect display driver is at fault. Anyway, the BSOD only listed the codes. No filenames or driver names given. (it wouldn't be Microsoft if it did) The codes listed are as follow: 0x0000007E (0xc000005, 0x8050D06C, 0xF898DA80, 0xF898D780)

    And i do appreciate your help.

    +
    0 Votes
    ernest_cheng

    I did try using Norton's emergency repair tool (NED) to boot and scan the laptop but it didn't find anything. Do you think NED's just not detecting it? I still suspect an incorrect display driver is at fault. Anyway, the BSOD only listed the codes. No filenames or driver names given. (it wouldn't be Microsoft if it did) The codes listed are as follow: 0x0000007E (0xc000005, 0x8050D06C, 0xF898DA80, 0xF898D780)

    And i do appreciate your help.

    +
    0 Votes
    holmescd

    I just realized how old this thread is, and that you've probably already resolved your issue one way or another.

    But anyway, I tend to agree with BudhaScott's analysis that the problem causing the slowdown was probably malware of some sort, and that sometimes you should just take the blue pill (format the drive and reinstall the OS).

    Since the system is already hosed up, the best recourse (IMHO) would be to backup the files on the drive if the user can't live without them, and reformat the drive (not the quick method) and reinstall Windows. This will likely give you the best bang for your buck, or in this case the best return on your time investment. That way you are pretty well assured that the system will be as stable as it can ever get when you're done with it.

    Regarding malware, no one program will ever find/remove it all, you need a "suite" of utilities to handle different types of malware. In addition to a good antivirus program my personal choices of free programs are:
    1. LavaSoft's AdAware (when licensing permits it's use)
    2. Spybot Search and Destroy
    3. SpywareBlaster
    4. AVG AntiSpyware (used to be called Ewido)
    5. A-Squared
    6. I used to use Giant AntiSpyware, but Microsoft bought it and now calls it Windows Defender. Since the new owners took charge this program has found few infections for me, and I sometimes don't even install it any more.

    Good luck!

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    0 Votes
    dj_viper2020

    did you try reinstalling the OS that could fix the problem, but only if it comes down to that