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toxic boss with career threats

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toxic boss with career threats

Shriks
Quite a common thought/talk these days, how does one manage ones career in a toxic work environment - here is my case which I need to (vent out - if you will!!) and get some vision for myself.
My current role has left me confused and dazed - and made my thought process regarding my career all the more convoluted.
Couple of reasons
a. I have 4 dependents to take care of, parents, wife and kid
my dad recently met with an accident and that calls for me to take leave from work to attend on him - he lives in a different city;
I have taken 15 days off already and now any more leave is being held against me;

b. My current work role is that of a coordinator, pseudo-manager, BPM modeler - basically an executor role - in a body shopped T&M arrangement, in a project where the quantum of work is not as much as it was earlier thought out to be;
So here I travel 2 hrs one way to work and back, and sit on a job where work is limited but only attendance is of importance; makes me all the more frustrated to continue sitting here at work while my dad needs my help and support;

Topping all this is a manager who is absolutely uncouth when it comes to managing this team - comprised of members who have been transferred to this location threatened with job termination letters - or dealing with any of their issues, including my need to take time off to be with my parents

The only thing that runs through my mind is to save my job, for the sake of my dependants and the rest of my thought process is totally blanked out, just 'cos I don't have a supporting boss, a vindictive work envt. with no one to trust...

So what do I do...
What I want to do is probably throw it all out and go attend to a patient who needs attention and care and happens to be my dad.. and keep my job - which my boss does not want to help me with
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    1 Votes
    CharlieSpencer

    Overhaul your resume and start looking for another job. Consider one that may pay less but is closer to home than two hours; what you lose in money you may save in gas.

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    0 Votes
    AnsuGisalas

    Going down in pay can easily be worth it to achieve greater job satisfaction - and job security too; after all, that function sounds like it's a kamikaze department; designed to crash and burn - with layoffs for all! Don't stay for the bitter end, use this time to sew up a parachute and bail!

    Good luck and Godspeed.

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    GSG

    I drive 100 miles per day just to get to work and home again, so a couple of years ago, I sat down and figured out how much I spend per working hour in gas money when gas is at $2, $3, and $4 per gallon, then estimated the same if I worked within 10 miles of where I lived. From there, I figured out how much of a net pay decrease that would be, then figured in my payroll tax to get the gross pay cut I could stand.

    I was surprised at how much of a cut I could take. I've kept that in a spreadsheet and refer to it occasionally. Also, since I drive my vehicles to well over 100,000 miles, I figured out my car payment savings would last an extra few years, which means that I could take an even larger pay cut.

    In fact, I ended up breaking everything down in a spreadsheet that took essentials like house payment, insurance, food, etc... and figured how much per hour goes to those items, then the stuff that I didn't have to have went in its own section. I cut quite a bit of unnecessary spending out of my budget when I saw the ratio between the percentage of my salary that went to essentials, the percentage to savings, and the percentage to entertainment.

  • +
    1 Votes
    CharlieSpencer

    Overhaul your resume and start looking for another job. Consider one that may pay less but is closer to home than two hours; what you lose in money you may save in gas.

    +
    0 Votes
    AnsuGisalas

    Going down in pay can easily be worth it to achieve greater job satisfaction - and job security too; after all, that function sounds like it's a kamikaze department; designed to crash and burn - with layoffs for all! Don't stay for the bitter end, use this time to sew up a parachute and bail!

    Good luck and Godspeed.

    +
    0 Votes
    GSG

    I drive 100 miles per day just to get to work and home again, so a couple of years ago, I sat down and figured out how much I spend per working hour in gas money when gas is at $2, $3, and $4 per gallon, then estimated the same if I worked within 10 miles of where I lived. From there, I figured out how much of a net pay decrease that would be, then figured in my payroll tax to get the gross pay cut I could stand.

    I was surprised at how much of a cut I could take. I've kept that in a spreadsheet and refer to it occasionally. Also, since I drive my vehicles to well over 100,000 miles, I figured out my car payment savings would last an extra few years, which means that I could take an even larger pay cut.

    In fact, I ended up breaking everything down in a spreadsheet that took essentials like house payment, insurance, food, etc... and figured how much per hour goes to those items, then the stuff that I didn't have to have went in its own section. I cut quite a bit of unnecessary spending out of my budget when I saw the ratio between the percentage of my salary that went to essentials, the percentage to savings, and the percentage to entertainment.