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Who's moving to the cloud with Microsoft?

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Who's moving to the cloud with Microsoft?

caroseed
I'm interested to know how the TechRepublic crowd rate Microsoft's cloud offerings (Azure, System Center 2012/Hyper V and Office 365) compared to those of their main competitors, Google and Amazon.
Is Microsoft still seen primarily as a software developement company, rather than a CSP? Does its history of market domination in this area stand against it? Or - looking at it the opposite way - does its experience in the world of enterprise IT make it a stronger contender for the cloud?
Any particular pros or cons?
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    CharlieSpencer

    -IF- we were looking to pay someone else to host our data and apps, we'd give them an equal shot along with the competitors you mentioned. Come to think of it, they might have a slight advantage because of our existing relationship with them.

    -IF-, but we're not moving to cloud.

    If this had been over in the main forum, I probably would have bypassed it. It's in the Cooler, so I feel no guilt about chiming in.

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    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Mainly because the clients have to store their own data and are too small for a Private Cloud.

    Not even thought about with the majority of the clients and the few that have where kicked back into place when they spoke to the Authority that certifies them. But then what would you expect with Doctors? :^0

    The one who could possible use a Cloud sells Earth Moving Equipment and they quite rightly say if they are unable to drive a Bulldozer through a local Building they don't want to deal with a company. In Tech Words if they ain't local we don't want to deal with them.

    Col

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    NickNielsen Moderator

    We deal with too much proprietary data, so we're staying with our current system for the foreseeable future.

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    jck

    It's a bad move for most purposes.

    Store your non-proprietary information? Sure.

    Put your organization's vital systems and private data? Only if you want to add immense risk.

    Good luck to anyone who goes out there...it's playing a game of technical Russian Roulette with your data and systems assets.

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    CharlieSpencer

    -IF- we were looking to pay someone else to host our data and apps, we'd give them an equal shot along with the competitors you mentioned. Come to think of it, they might have a slight advantage because of our existing relationship with them.

    -IF-, but we're not moving to cloud.

    If this had been over in the main forum, I probably would have bypassed it. It's in the Cooler, so I feel no guilt about chiming in.

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    0 Votes
    HAL 9000 Moderator

    Mainly because the clients have to store their own data and are too small for a Private Cloud.

    Not even thought about with the majority of the clients and the few that have where kicked back into place when they spoke to the Authority that certifies them. But then what would you expect with Doctors? :^0

    The one who could possible use a Cloud sells Earth Moving Equipment and they quite rightly say if they are unable to drive a Bulldozer through a local Building they don't want to deal with a company. In Tech Words if they ain't local we don't want to deal with them.

    Col

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    0 Votes
    NickNielsen Moderator

    We deal with too much proprietary data, so we're staying with our current system for the foreseeable future.

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    0 Votes
    jck

    It's a bad move for most purposes.

    Store your non-proprietary information? Sure.

    Put your organization's vital systems and private data? Only if you want to add immense risk.

    Good luck to anyone who goes out there...it's playing a game of technical Russian Roulette with your data and systems assets.