Tablets

$100 LY-706 MID Android tablet teardown

Removing the Wi-Fi PCB

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
kerem
kerem

I've recently bought one of these tablets. First off the OS over them is just borrowed from a phone and does not scale to the screen. The screen is very low DPI with enormous characters. The touchscreen is ultra low response and the product is not robust. The touch sensitive sensor is just behind a transparent film and it easy to crack the sensor.. The battery life is not optimized for the device and even if it is in standby it consumes much energy and the device will deplete it in 2 hours time. There are lots of application incompatibilities. Games can not detect sensors. Programs can not find application paths etc. I also have a Galaxy TAB and these devices are not comparable to a decent tablet like it. They are only good for cheap price but apart from that they are simply "quality free" and useless.

DNSB
DNSB

I'd suspect the Hynix chips in image 57 are 1 gigabit chips in a 128Mbyte by 8 configuration. Two chips would give you 256MBytes of RAM or 2 gigabits for those who love larger sounding numbers.

smankinson
smankinson

Is there any way to not have to scroll down after every pic? I've not look at these articles sometimes because it gets a little annoying. Yes, I am complaining. LOL Keep up the good work. Seriously. Did you do one on the Galaxy tab?

A.C
A.C

I have got one of the little 7" EPC netbooks running windows CE 6, which works fine as long as you respect it's obvious limitations and it helps to have small hands with the dinky little keyboard! Uses the same Wondermedia 8505 Arm SOC as the Mid tablets. I've also had it running linux, but without some more effort that is actually more trouble than it's worth (oddities such as only being able to use the network as root, not being able to open a terminal due to permissions problems on various parts of the filesystem... all those really annoying little things that apt-get and it's ilk are supposed to get around, not introduce)

camilleristeve
camilleristeve

My dad bought 2 of these 1 which is quite similar and another one with few better specs and is 10" the seller and the manufacture states that it's cpu is 1GHz, but truth be told its 800MHz, So not only they are not very worth buying, the specs are not what you think they are, what im trying to say is that other components can be different than listed like the cpu. So its better to save some money and buy proper hardware, then buying "cheap shit"

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler moderator

A wave of tablets is beginning to sweep across the tech world. The most-talked about devices will be high-end units, such as the Apple iPad and Motorola XOOM. But among the crowd will also be low-price, bare-bones machines, such as the LY-706 that I cracked open in the gallery above: http://www.techrepublic.com/photos/100-ly-706-mid-android-tablet-teardown/6191704 At $100 the LY-706 (also know as the MID 706) is roughly 20 percent the price of an iPad or Samsung Galaxy tab (sans contract). But even with such a low price, do you get enough bang for your buck? Neither TechRepublic's Mark Kaelin nor I think you do. The LY-706 is underpowered, uses old technology, and the build quality is sub-par. But, perhaps we expect too much for a device that costs about the same as a nice dinner for two. What do you think?

kerem
kerem

These devices contain 256 MB memory and almost all are with 4 GB flash although the OS on them generally formats only 2 - 2.5 GB of it.

ashok277
ashok277

Hi I bought a MID 706, and the video play back is very slow, while the audio with it is decoded in real time. I bought it only for viewing videos and it is totally useless for that.

jonf
jonf

I've owned 2 of these cheap Android tablets. One stuck at 1.6 and the other at 2.2. Unless you trust the hacked firmware releasers. I've bricked 1 unit. The cheap tablets are nearly worthless if they do not have a capacitive screen. Unless you are going to use it as a photo frame and music/media streamer. The resistive screens, (Think stylus required) are so cumbersome that although capable, it is frustrating to use many apps. Resistive screens are extremely sensitive to pressure changes. As an example... when playing a game like Angry birds, if the pressure of your finger changes even slightly, the tablet will sense removal of your finger. It can be extremely frustrating. Figure on connecting a mouse and keyboard to get any usefulness out of the resistive tablets or only use apps that require very little, very controlled input. Multitouch is non existent even though many cheap tablets claim they supports multi touch.