Windows

7 ways to save time with event viewer

 

Filters and Custom Views are great features, but they are designed for discovering an event after it has already happened. If you want to know exactly when an event occurs, you can save yourself time by attaching a task to an event.

While the Filter or Custom View is active, select the Attach Task To This Event in the Action panel. When you see the Create Basic Task Wizard dialog box, just give it a name and description and click Next.

Image created by Greg Shultz for TechRepublic.

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

21 comments
PhilerD
PhilerD

I 'think' I understand where this is going... facebook followers who stay on it regularly complain of the adds and info gathering, all of which garnish large revenues, but the path of Tech Republic is somewhat different, as they need revenue to survive but try not to blister you with requests, pluss they are more specific in their direction.  I think these guys should look at the site of Cornell Law: http://www.law.cornell.edu/search/site/constitution which asks for donations in a different way, and has no adds.

Tech Republic should also go back to the downloadable PDF which is much more user friendly.

Thanks for allowing me this input...

Phil D.

billtomlin
billtomlin

I can only imagine that creating these slide show style presentations must be more time consuming for you, and they provide so little value, and are very time consuming to look through. How about giving up this format Greg?

grafcom_z
grafcom_z

I second the suggestion given by jfuller05. We understand that Techrepublic has to have revenues through ads, but reloading a page 16 times for watching a series of slides? In my opinion, excessive...

badjer
badjer

I've read (and very often appreciated) TechRepublic???s informative articles. BUT! ??? I'm busy ??? I don't want to waste my valuable time working my way through web page after web page after web page just so I can read what could have been simple scrolling down. This approach simply muddies the message in what should be a straightforward and simple article - it's frustrating and unnecessary. If TechRepublic contributors have something of value to say, PLEASE be concise and say it cleanly and in a straightforward way ??? most of your articles don???t require the multiple mouse button pressing that this particular style of presentation demands. You???re way overboard with the bells and whistles of website technology ??? who???s in charge of your website page design?

Tech77
Tech77

While I, too agree that a downloadable---or @ least a more-easily printable---v. of this info would be nice, I think we all have to keep in mind Ziff-Davis' need to attract & drive web traffic; it's not like we're all paying for professional subscriptions that can help defray the costs of providing this type of content. Our busy days & multiple focii may often preclude our returning to look for a previously-posted interest, but it's been my experience that a little investment in such often turns up the existence of a later-produced, more facile compilation of data such as this excellent overview article...

gnelson3
gnelson3

where is the article, not fluff

Steve2013
Steve2013

This should NOT be in click-through format. It should all be printable. Lets get real. This makes me lose interest in TechRepublic if I have to spend so much time clicking and printing, clicking and printing, or saving screenshots. Really!

dayen
dayen

I like one too

grelfod
grelfod

This format is very troublesome to read an article. Subtracts from the overall value of the information given imho.

lunchbeast
lunchbeast

They were fashionable web page eye candy for about two weeks.

dna.goldsberry
dna.goldsberry

This presentation format is too much trouble. You have to click your way through and each time, in between, scroll your way up to see the text. When I see this format I bail out... too much trouble... ruins the continuity.

philstilliard
philstilliard

Hi I cannot read the text in the red boxes, too small.

devand
devand

Anyone who administers a Windows 2008+ domain with Win7 client machines can probably share my agony with the new Event Viewer. It takes FOREVER to load upon first startup, no matter what system you are on..be it a Win7 client, a 2008 or 2008R2 server, 32 or 64 bit. One of the first things you can do to save time is to grab the Eventvwr.msc out of an XP or 2003 system and copy it over to your new systems. That will infinitely save you time when viewing event logs, of course the problem is not all situations are compatible with it. If you don't want to do that, you can turn off the Action pane (pain!) from the View/Customize menu for a friendlier view. I'm also appalled that even since XP, one cannot simply right-click event details and click Copy. Instead, there is a useless "Copy" button that copies all the details and jumbles it into a chunky text format once pasted. Worthless. Microsoft, what were you thinking? And yes, this "article" was not well thought-out either. Clicking through slideshow images is fine for a device breakdown or something like that, but for a topic such as this, it doesn't match up.

jfuller05
jfuller05

I think this article would be better if it could be viewed as an article with the images placed throughout the article instead of the current format. Having to click through the images is a annoying.

TheGear
TheGear

Good article! I hadn't noticed that remote access was a feature of the event viewer. Only thing is, I can't access other systems. Does a particular service have to be turned on in the remotes, or is the event viewer finicky about remote logins?

joe935
joe935

Where's the PDF file?

gechurch
gechurch

I agree not being able to right-click and copy is a strange oversight, but you can select text and ctrl+c still.

devand
devand

TheGear, remote log viewing is indeed a feature tied with Computer Management. You must make sure that the client machines to be managed have the Windows Remote Management service running, and Remote Procedure Call probably isn't a bad idea either. Also be sure that the Remote Administration and Remote Event Log exceptions are enabled on the client machine's firewall. once all that is done you can connect to a remote computer's event logs by typing "eventvwr \\machinename" in a command prompt.

arthunter
arthunter

Yes, could you give us a link to the PDF or blog post.