Open Source

Anyone for Pi? Mods and hacks for the Raspberry Pi

Forgot to turn off the bathroom light in the morning? That's not a problem with this home-automation project.

Here the Pi is being used to connect to a home fitted with sensors and switches that allow the house to be remotely monitored and controlled.

The system can monitor data such as the temperature in individual rooms, the electricity consumption of the house, or how much oil is in a heating system tank. It also allows the user to control electrical fittings, performing tasks such as switching on and off lights, towel rails or even a fountain.

The house, seen here, is on the Isle of Wight off the south coast of England and can be controlled and monitored via a mobile phone app or web interface.

In a demo of the project, lights and the fountain are switched on and off using a web interface, by someone based 50 miles away in Basingstoke.

The Pi-based system is using the Liberty Profile for IBM's WebSphere application server to interface with telemetry based on the MQQT messaging protocol, which is handled by IBM's Really Small Message Broker (RSMB) messaging server.

The project has been set up by Andy Stanford-Clark and Simon Maple, of IBM, who used Stanford-Clark's house as a testbed for the system.

Screenshot: WASdev/YouTube.com

About

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic UK. He writes about the technology that IT-decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

5 comments
bart001fr
bart001fr

Hooray for that robot drone search plane. The projects are interesting, but the killer will always be a small, portable display unit. The Noritake-Itron display shown in the last image retails for about $100, ten times its actual worth, and this is a naked OEM display! I can get a new 15-inch LCD computer display for less. The only problem is that I need to plug it into the mains. On the other hand I can easily see someone building a cheap (costwise) set of blade servers. I guess the only limit really is the prospective user's imagination. Anyone else have good ideas? Let's hear them.

SiO2
SiO2

And other than having to be a little choosy about some of the hardware you plug into it, its awesome. I had a bit of trouble finding an SD card, wireless keyboard and webcam until I realised the PS3's eyethingy was an ancient V4L with no image compression and that works fine, it cost me 3 quid in a game shop secondhand. I'm building a 'terminator' using a Pi and an Arduino back-to-back, the webcam on top, a mobile battery and 10 RC servos - 2-axis ankles, 1-axis knee and hip and a final pair to move the webcam (it doesnt have arms, yet anyway...) along with a laser pointer as a targeting reticule. I'd already got the vision and targeting working on my big PC, that can tag my hands with a laser dot at 8 frames a second so I was surprised to see the Pi do it at the same speed. I've spent more than a few years learning embedded C+ trying to do what I'm doing, and the Pi makes it as simple as simulating it in a big PC, except its for real. I've been using the guts of ARM-powered smartphones for my robotics up til now, as theres a plentiful supply of cheap processors laying around for free if you dont mind hacking them out. It doesnt take much to rip out a screen and keyboard and install Python in an old Nokia, but the Pi is a whole other order above those little beasts. Looking at the photos, it seems not many really 'get' the Pi. Building a 'supercomputer' out of them defeats their object, as does running Windows - even though it IS a cheaper way of doing it. I guess they didnt grow up with Basic like I did though, and thats a big part of the concept. Teh Internets reacted like I thought too; type Raspberry into Goog and the most common hit is... A case for your Pi, designed by some wannabe who hasnt got one yet and thinks he can make money off it. The BYO tablet is hysterical in its pointlessness, but clever all the same, and certainly beats the rest of the internet. The team building the boat, however, now thats an interesting project that really does push the Pi's design envelope. I like that one...

dale.mccart
dale.mccart

Having had IBM 4381 serial # 121 (first customer install) I can say it was about double the size of a side by side refrigerator. The box was only half full as Model Groups 1 and 2 were uniprocessors, and the space was reserved for the Model Group 3 dual processor . It did replace a 1 MIPS IBM 370/158 that was eight times its size. http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP4381.html http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP3158.html

maj37
maj37

The IBM 4381 was not a room sized computer, unless you are talking about a pretty small room, even if you include the disk drives. It was of course much larger then the Pi.

DaveWade
DaveWade

The 4381 could support a huge array of peripherals. We did have rather a lot on the one I worked on. There were two strings of 3380, A row of four or six tape drives, a couple of 3720 comms controllers, a couple of 3174 screen controllers , a 7171 for ASCII devices and a Series/1 for X.25. I think that counts as a room full.