Nasa / Space

Boeing / Saturn V

The First Saturn V On the Launchpad

Boeing, McDonnell Douglas and North American Aviation collaborated to develop and produce the mammoth 363-foot Saturn V rocket that propelled the Apollo spacecraft to the moon in 1969. All 15 S-1Cs were built between 1965 and 1975. Twelve were used on the Apollo missions, and the 13th, in 1973, placed Skylab in Earth orbit. The remaining rockets were placed on display. (Photo Courtesy Boeing)

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8 comments
clarkeshark
clarkeshark

The photo titled "a special Boeing team.." shows my father, Charlie Clarke, ( facing camera in suit) . He was an Engineer with Boeing.  My father was with Boeing through the Apollo Missions and then with PRC and retired with Lockheed in 1990. he is now 84 years old and resides in Newnan Ga.

laura.walker
laura.walker

Peter Moss is correct, when I was at Kennedy in 1968 there were 3 crawlers - clearly seen in the this last photos. I belive that one was retired to serve as spare parts. LRW

cneimeis
cneimeis

This is supposed to be "Video: Shuttle Endeavor launches". Please send me the correct URL. ckn@brokenwall.com

peter.moss
peter.moss

If there were only two crawlers - then how come in the next 'shot' from altitude, looking to the VAB, we see one in the fore-ground and TWO more in the right background? That makes 3 by me...

thezar
thezar

As a programmer out of Goddard SFC outside DC, I would love to have more info on the pictures, dates, etc.

bmwjason
bmwjason

There are only two crawlers. They move under the launch platforms and hydraulically lift the platform. The platform has a base and the tower. The crawler is seperate.

mark.johnson
mark.johnson

The majority of the full-up or under-assembly pictures of the Saturn V seem to be of Apollo 4 - aka AS-501, the first unmanned flight article. AS-501 was launched on 9 November 1967. It may not be so obvious, but a lot of the lab and 'assembly/testing' pictures are of mockup hardware, as evidenced by the lack of complete flight fixtures, dents, scratches, and peeling paint.