Networking

Boxee Box (D-Link) Teardown

Cracking open the Boxee Box by D-Link

In November 2010, Boxee and D-Link began shipping the Boxee Box by D-Link Internet TV set-top box. Follow along as I crack open the Boxee Box for a look at the hardware inside.

To see how the Boxee Box compares against other Internet TV set-top boxes, read Jason Hiner's review of the Apple TV, Roku Player, and Google TV, the Boxee Box. And don't forget to check out our cracking open gallery of the 2010 Apple TV.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic

Caption by: Bill Detwiler

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

6 comments
Etluhcs
Etluhcs

Definitely should not be for sale at the stage that it's at. Far too may bugs, and unless you have natural night vision, the remote is a total sanity killer (back keys with gray print) .

eyesak
eyesak

Not on my list - Thanks for the article. I like to know the components, could be handy if we needed or wanted a teardown. I liked, seeing the cardboard box, of the boxee box. :)

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler moderator

At least four major tech players released new or updated Internet TV set-top boxes in 2010--Apple TV, Boxee Box by D-Link, Google TV Logitech Revue, and Roku Player. Do you already have one of these boxes or is one of them on your 2010 holiday gift list?

MrAnderson1st
MrAnderson1st

Good stuff - great look into this strangely shaped box. I know they were trying to do something interesting, but they made people that just want to stick it somewhere eye bulge. Adding some JQuery AJAX for loading the images would be a really nice contribution to user experience on your site. JQuery or something to load the images in this gallery so the page does not postback every time would be great. Now it is quite a jarring experience. The scroll does not even like to stay in place. Cheers

mckinnej
mckinnej

The Boxee device is new to me. I'm a Patriot Box Office owner. Here is my comparison based on my experience and this article. The Boxee could benefit from an internal HD. The PBO does not come with one, but it's a cinch to install. Not sure how well the Boxee works with network storage, but the PBO works flawlessly with a SAMBA share. Love that Boxee remote. Totally jealous of that. The PBO doesn't stream Internet content on its own, but software such as Tversity and Playon provide this capability and with a lot more channels too. I would like to see the Boxee GUI. The PBO's GUI is its biggest flaw. The new version is much better, but it's still not something Grandma could use. PBO support is excellent. They have active forums with active factory reps. They have an active development staff with regular firmware updates for download. The PBO can be used as-is or be hacked to your heart's desire. It's basically a Linux system inside, so everything from minor tweaks to alternative firmware is possible. That odd shape of the Boxee would drive me nuts. I'd have to figure out some way to hide it. (Just my ODC.) If the Boxee had a way to add more channels (it may) and had at least the option to add an internal drive, I'd be willing to give it a shot.

treebeard
treebeard

post a table comparing the features and hardware of the 4 new systems?