Laptops

Cracking Open: Acer Aspire S3 Ultrabook

Acer Aspire S3 Ultrabook teardown

Designed to compete with Apple's MacBook Air, the Acer Aspire S3 is part of a growing list of Windows PCs called Ultrabooks. These super-thin laptops, offer more processing power than netbooks, but won't weigh down your bag as you run through the airport.

Manufactures like Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Acer, Asus, and Toshiba are all jumping on the Ultrabook bandwagon (thanks in part to a significant push from Intel). Follow along as we crack open the Acer Aspire S3 Ultrabook.

For a detailed analysis of the teardown, check out my article and video, Acer Aspire S3 Teardown: Good hardware, lackluster construction.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

7 comments
m9ronaldo9
m9ronaldo9

need help  

small piece of headphone jack is broken on my acer aspire s3 now its not working can it be replaced or its attached to motherboard   

pconn
pconn

can the Qualcomm Atheros AR5B225 WLAN BT card be replaced with an intel WLAN to enable Widi

janitorman
janitorman

We got an HP laptop with an i3 for $650 that has about the same weight, and about the same dimensions, but is more capable than any computer we have in the house. I already consider that "ultraportable" and the cost was about $650 WITH OFFICE included. Maybe we just got a deal? I think this is just marketing hype to promote a product that is probably less durable with about the same capability (or less) for more money.

mlemay
mlemay

Good speech recognition and other user interface breakthroughs in my opinion are going to bring people to the marketplace. I just bought a Droid Bionic and have been amazed at how reliable the speech recognition is. It has changed the way that I previously interacted with my mobile device by allowing me a more natural avenue. Unfortunately the Ultrabook kind of comes across as a Jabberwocky project.

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

I have, in fact, installed replacement HDDs into these devices without a problem. Firewire 800, USB II, and thunderbolt ports are on all the new Apple products, so why the need for eSATA?

tripplec
tripplec

I am looking at this as I have various non expanable Apple products (notebooks and iMAC) storage is restricted and without some level of expansion inside or out they're constrained. There is no earthly reason that an eSATA II port cannot be on any of the systems. This hold very true for the small devices with minum storage capability. The SATA controller is already part of every computer made today. So no external port is just unacceptable. I concider that looking at the SATA genertions of the iMAC with all that rea estate ports were constrained and more storage outside (not firewire or USB but much faster SATA II). I've been looking for a new notebook but its extremely hard to find a higher end on with eSATA and other established ports for various connectivity. I'll wait until the Ivy Bridge Mobile lines come out this year now from Intel.

thegreenwizard1
thegreenwizard1

Yes, since I just bought this laptop, it would be nice to have this "repair" instruction on my PC. Thanks.