Servers

Cracking Open the Adaptec Snap Server 520

Rack mountable server

Rack mountable servers save space and power and are a standard part of most any enterprise communications network. The Adaptec Snap Server 520 is one of the more typical examples of this type of server, so we decided to Crack It Open to see what was inside.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

5 comments
hi-zaki
hi-zaki

Personally, I think that it's either an ethernet controller or part of the Northbridge chipset (although I think that's whats under the green heatsink). I believe that on the 520, gigabit ethernet was standard and dual gigabit nics were an option, and I quote: "Optional dual hot-swappable power supplies, hot-swappable SATA II drives, and dual gigabit Ethernet ports with Ethernet teaming for load balancing and port failover".

scan_25
scan_25

4ram slots and only one used by default. In the slot being used we have a (512MB PC3200 DDR SDRAM 400Mhz ECC Registered Low Profile) stick. So keep that in mind if you chose to add more RAM to the system. We found the need to add more RAM after connection limits and server lockups from users running PST off the NAS.

crazycory9
crazycory9

Picture 4 is not VGA but looks more like a Serial port.

seanferd
seanferd

The images, at original size, are fantastic. Very ... clear. What is up with all that thermal paste? Not that I have any reference for how much paste would go on such a processor. Do they want the actual copper involved, or what? Edit: Strangely enough: Thermal paste issues! http://blogs.zdnet.com/Apple/?p=1662&tag=nl.e622 "Excess thermal paste causing high temps in MacBook Air (updated)"

Ed Spencer
Ed Spencer

Picture 4 IS a serial port. The DB9 connector is typical of a 9 pin serial connection. While VGA is the same 'size' it's a HDDB15 - a high density DB15 connector. The serial connector is for configuration before you have the network set up and is pretty common with network based devices - ala NAS, Routers, Switches, etc.