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Cracking Open the ASUS Eee 901 20G ultra-portable

Camera and microphone - check

On the other end of the motherboard we can see the connections for the microphone and for the camera which are both mounted inside the lid with the LCD.

The connection under the tape that I didn't see until I started to remove the motherboard goes to the fan, which we will see later.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

21 comments
AntiGol
AntiGol

Anybody cracked open the 901 battery and replaced defective cell(s)?

lamswee
lamswee

SIMPLY-GREAT JOB!!!!

emmerc7
emmerc7

I got my Asus eee Pc 900 20GB and I really like it! I blow out the xandros and installed Ubuntu-eee and wine and it does everything I wish. Excellent machine, I will expand the ram with a Kingston DDR667 2GB and the storage with a 16GB flash usb drive. I am looking for a 6600 mAh battery! :-)

Fatman_walking
Fatman_walking

About the aluminum foil. I used to work at Radio Shack Computer Service about 25 years ago. The computer cases back then were often lined with aluminum foil to help reduce RFI.

ecasis
ecasis

Hi!, very usefull info, I have one question: How can I reset the BIOS password forgotten?...maybe disconectting this battery?, is there another procedure for password reseting without disconnect the battery?....thanks! , happy 2009!.. E.C.

alec.moores
alec.moores

Does anyone know if the 901 battery pack will fit the E900 to give better than 1 1/2 hours life? Cheers, Alec.

metalx1000
metalx1000

That's a Eee PC 900 not 901. The 901 has an extra strip of buttons at the top of the keyboard and plus it says "900" on the sticker on the bottom.

edbjr
edbjr

Bought one! Love it! The Linux version does everything I need on the road, between customer sites. When I'm in at the customer, I pull out the Think Pad!

DNSB
DNSB

I think this chip would have been manufactured by Integrated Circuit Systems which merged with IDT. My guess from the 9LPR426AGLF(?) part number which does not show in the ICS/IDT part number search is that it is a likely a clock generator/driver. For those who would like to try identifying a manufacturer from the logo, I've found the following link useful: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~eshop/mflogo.dir/ic-id.html

schran.gd
schran.gd

interesting but just a bit to limited

alzie
alzie

Thanx for the bottom. Bless you for blowing the warranty. Now, lets see what the LED backlight looks like.

james
james

I like the efficiency of the design.. espicially the solid state drive that looks like the size of standard laptop memory.. also using the metal keyboard back for the heatsink was a good way to save space..

Lost Cause?
Lost Cause?

Looks great! Does this come as a downloadable pdf?

Resrup44
Resrup44

I've been looking at it this afternoon. I have a 7.4V 6600mAh pack which gives about 20 mins life . Getting the case open needs a bit of care; it looks as though it has been welded or very well glued together. I worked carefully along the seam on the back of the back with a Stanley knife and after a bit could see the blue covering of the cells. Same along te side seams - a bit trickier because they have a couple of corners but eventually things freed up enough to move. I was then able to lever the two parts of the shell apart so that they hinged along the front seam that eventually cracked open. Glad i hadn't cut there because there is a circuit board that could have been damaged. The pack comprises 2 sets of 3 18650 Li-Ion batteries. Each set of three is connected in parallel and then the two sets are series connected to give the output voltage (hope that's clear. A bit of careful adhesive/potting compound scraping released a board mounted ? temperature sensor ? fixed to one of the batteries and then cleared away enough gunge to allow all 6 cells and the pcb to lifted clear of the bottom half of the case. That's as far as I've got and I know I haven't wrecked things completely yet because I've been able to put it all back together and put it pack into the computer and writing this on the power it contains. There are now two problems. The first is that the sets of three cells are custom assembled by spot welding onto specially shaped connector plates. Replicating this is not a diy option. It is gong to take careful arrangement of cells and routing of wires to get an equivalent assembly of individual cells back into the case but I think it looks do-able. The second is that when, without having yet broken any connections, I measure cell voltages with I get 3.9v for one set of three cells and over 4 for the other. It's difficult to interpret such measurements but there seems to be chance that the cells are healthy and that it's the pcb that is faulty in which case a repair is out of reach. So now is the decision point. Do I disassemble further, buy new cells and try to rebuild. Or do I accept that a new pack from pcbattery.co.uk at ??30 + ??4pp really is the best bet. And I have to admit that I have already bought a new pack. Do you really think I would wreck the broken one without having bought a back-up? The only small drawback is that it had to come from Hong Kong and took a month rather than the hoped-for 15 days to arrive. I think the company is genuine and offers good quality. I hope not to have to put their two-year guarantee to the test. It's just that the post from Hong Kong isn't as fast as you would expect when buying from a .co.uk website. Any further comments / advice particularly on identifying defective cells would be most welcome.

gafisher
gafisher

The photo of the "20-GB SSD" seems to show eight 1-GB flash chips, also consistent with the standard-model 900. Just ignore the article title and some of the captions and it's still a good article.

Haywood.Udume
Haywood.Udume

And that's not an Atom CPU - it's a Celeron 900! How come there aren't any instructions on how to remove the keyboard?

jacqui
jacqui

I've just got one, and it is great. Except... it doesn't work... or at least it won't connect to an encrypted wifi network. I was looking forward to rolling up my sleeves and getting to grips with Linux, but hey, it's no good if it don't connect to the internet! So I've sent mine back and will have to keep using Windows. Rats!

skris88
skris88

Hi I am angry... I have an Eee 900 and it too has the same 20GB solid state drive as the EEE 901. I loaded Windows Vista on it and it works well except for one thing - and (in this rare instance) it's not the fault of Windows. The problem is the read-write speed of the 2nd Solid State Drive available. The SSD is presented as Drive0 and Drive1, 3.76GB as the first drive and 15.03GB for the second. I also use a Class6 SD card in the SD slot. I have partitioned and formatted the drives into the following: D: Drive0 - FAT - Boot/Documents folder C: Drive1 - First 10GB - NTFS - Windows Vista E: Drive1 - Balance 5GB - FAT - Music folder F: SD card - 2GB - FAT - Backup I have run various HDD speed checks but Drives C: and E: are 9 times slower than D: or F: It appears that the SSD is has a combination of 4GB Class2 and 15GB Class6 flash-memory. I want my money back, Asus! skris88

gafisher
gafisher

>> "... it won't connect to an encrypted wifi network." Might be unusual encryption; I haven't had a problem.

gafisher
gafisher

Vista on an Asus 900? Sounds kinda like putting a 5-ton air conditioner on an MG.