Android

Cracking Open the Asus Eee Pad Transformer TF101

Asus Eee Pad Transformer TR101 Teardown: Ambient light sensor PCB

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

9 comments
dferro1
dferro1

Wow, this repair was amazingly simple thanks to your slideshow.  My wife had dropped my TF-101 and it hit on the corner nearest the power button, causing it to be jammed in there crooked.  I was able to disassemble the frame from the rest of it and then re-assemble it.  The tricky part was to get the power button in straight, which I managed with a piece of tape to hold it in place.  I sort of pressed tape around the sides of the button so that it was in there straight.  Works as good as the day we bought it now.  Thanks again for the pictures!

comisbellicus
comisbellicus

Great Post Bill, After having a problem with my TF101 i did a quick search on the internet and came across your Cracking Open post. Keep these coming! Great pictures, with headings describing what I'm looking at. If I do need to do any disassembling of this unit, this will be my first stop. Also very interesting to see how internal components are organized between the two tablet examples you've provided. The assembly of the tf101 seems to be a bit chaotic (yellow tape... seriously?) compared to the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1.

rohitmathew
rohitmathew

Can this teardown of the Asus TF101 be made available as a single PDF file. I usually try and take care of the gadgets i use and want to be able to use this information a couple of years down the line by which time this information will be hard to come by.

bart001fr
bart001fr

Did you put it back together? and Did it work after that? Thanks for this tear-down. One thing I learned is that this is a well-put-together tablet, though I agree with you that still more thought should have gone into the layout and final assembly. Otherwise, it looks solid.

alphaa10
alphaa10

Bill, I like the teardowns, and understand the underlying desire to explore mysterious gadgets. But it might help many newbies to understand they should not try teardowns at home. Teardowns void the warranty, and OEMs know how to detect tampering of any kind, innocent or otherwise.

deja_voodoo
deja_voodoo

I fail to see the point of these teardowns. You offer very little information, if any, under the photos. Why bother doing the work of opening the case and photographing the results if you're not going to at least tell us what we're looking at? As far as I can tell, you're preaching to the choir, those with enough experience to differentiate the different parts within the machines. To those of us with little or no experience, it's just a bunch parts. It's like looking at a map of a foreign country - in that country's language. There's no point of reference. It's a waste of bits for the photographs and bandwidth to look at the picture online.

ctucker
ctucker

No reference to original title; Room for 3g......

dgoodale
dgoodale

I'd love to read more of these reviews but personally, I get disgusted with the one sentence per page format. Maybe I'll have time for that when I retire in 10 years.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler moderator

The lead item in the TR Daily Digest, which you appear to be referring to, linked to my complete teardown analysis article--see below: Asus Eee Pad Transformer teardown: Convoluted, but 3G-ready internal design http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/itdojo/asus-eee-pad-transformer-teardown-convoluted-but-3g-ready-internal-design/2833 Earlier this year, we began publishing both an analysis article and gallery for each item we crack open. Our galleries aren't a good way to present text-heavy analysis.