Hardware

Cracking open the iZ3D 22-inch LCD monitor

iZ3D LCD monitor teardown

TechRepublic has been testing and reviewing the iZ3D monitor for about a month now. After creating a First Look gallery and then publishing a review on how well the 3D technology translates to real game play, we felt it was time to crack it open to see what was inside. The folks at iZ3D were very gracious and brave to allow us to do this and we appreciate the gesture.

The iZ3D Web site said we would find two LCD panels inside, but we were not sure how they would be configured. We envisioned elaborate optical trickery was needed to get the 3D effect, but we found the engineering to be rather straightforward. Scroll through the images and see for yourself.

About

Mark W. Kaelin has been writing and editing stories about the IT industry, gadgets, finance, accounting, and tech-life for more than 25 years. Most recently, he has been a regular contributor to BreakingModern.com, aNewDomain.net, and TechRepublic.

17 comments
terry1919
terry1919

Risking $1500.00 worth of equipment to satisfy your curiosity.... you save me the trouble heheheh

A_Hayden
A_Hayden

This is really cool... I'm not too familiar with a site that displays and describes how various devices work.. I'm really glad i've come across this site...

sabirhussainadn
sabirhussainadn

i want trouble shooting of operating systems documentation...please could u send this ..thank u......

jpb
jpb

It's a little difficult to see teh "3d-ness" of it on my 2D computer screen 8^D

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

I wouldn't mind knowing when this comes out. It's been in "pre-order" mode for a long time on their web site (www.iz3d.com). Probably unless you are a stereo-3D gamer (www.mtbs3d.com), the dual monitor won't be useful.

filker0
filker0

I'd be interested in seeing more detail on the LCD panels. Are they bonded together like a sandwitch without any filling? How heavy is it (the panel)? How much brighter does the flourescent panel have to be to illuminate two layers of LCD? (Is that what most of the beefed up power supply is for?) What are the cooling provisions?

btravers
btravers

Sorry, I accidently posted twice and can't figure out how to delete the second post.

btravers
btravers

FYI, the "power board" is pretty standard. Most LCD monitors use several florescent tubes for a backlight. Due to the nature of florescent lights, you can't just make one power source and power 10 tubes off of it. For the most part, you have to build a separate power supply for every 1 to 2 tubes. Also, the "power wires" for florescent tubes are generally pink and white. (High-voltage wire is usually a light red and white. Standard wire doesn't work because high voltage will "leak" through the insulation.) Also, good thing you didn't take the backlight apart... The tubes are extremely easy to break :-) Looks pretty cool!

zhaga1
zhaga1

I want one, but in one piece! well done

bgailer
bgailer

Yep. That's how it is spelled!

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Which is why with the right screen (such as this or it's 17" predecessor), a dual head graphics card and the right drivers, a 2-D game will probably look 3D-ish with this monitor....

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

The LCDs are layered yes. Heavy like a piece of glass I don't know that one - the power needed might explain why it has a 600:1 contrast ratio, which is pretty low. There are heat sinks, but no fans. I can tell you there is a lot of heat being generated.

parsa_bahrami
parsa_bahrami

Hi, First of all, thanks for the article. I never opened a flat screen so it was very useful. AND thanks for the point btravers made. I never knew this. BTW, You said the pink wires are "high-voltage" ones. Do you know what they are made out of? I mean they look the same size as the normal red wires, so I guess to make them a high voltage they need to either be made from other material or some extremely purified copper.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

I didn't know about the pink wires - that's good to know next time I start sticking my fingers in places they shouldn't go. ;)

mhorton
mhorton

Just like its spelt in picture 13 (the high power warning engraving)

btravers
btravers

High-voltage cable is identical to normal wire, but the insulation is made out of something else (I don't know what). Usually, the insulation is slightly thicker and tougher (depending on the voltage rating), but other than that, there are no differences.

Jxoco
Jxoco

You'll see pink and white wires on laptops as well. The transformers and circuitry are 'up-verters' to boost the voltage, hence the high voltage warnings, and to up the voltage frequency so that you don't get 'flicker' and the headaches that go along with 'flickering' of the light source. As you can conclude, just from the size of the components, this is where the energy consumption occurs.