Storage

Cracking open the SMC NAS TigerStore storage device

Behind the controller board

Behind the controller board there is not much to see. This circuit board manages the hot-swappable hard drive connections.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

13 comments
cathar.gnostic
cathar.gnostic

under cable 3 & 4 looks to be inductive filtering for th power supply, the other part that is a sort of darkish round object looks to be a cheap timing unit for the R/W controller, there are more stable designs available. On the + side, you can't go wrong with ARM.

intrepi
intrepi

It's one of those things that will be extremely useful to some and be of no use to others. I think it's a matter of how it will appeal to the individual who has a real need for this. Personally, it's not something that I will need but may need at some point in the future. It really is a matter of when and if I'll develop a need for it.

djnikos
djnikos

Where are the drive bays located? These photos are useless...

bstockha
bstockha

Some pictures of the area where the hard drives would be installed would be nice. I just hope that this device is more reliable than the Netgear "Storage Central" SC-101 which I made the mistake of relying on to store several years worth of photos.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

I only wish it was that simple. There a three Realtek chips on the board. You are correct that one of those is the Gigabit Ethernet switch, but the other two add the ability to control the device using a Web browser. All three chips work together.

jockojkj
jockojkj

I looked online and see that the cost of the SMC NAS TigerStore storage device is about $500. My PC group (www.fvpca.org) will be looking to have a program on NAS devices. One suggestion is to use FreeNAS to resurrect an older machine. I see the value of having a couple of 500 GB drives in a NAS for remote storage, backups, etc. A USB drive may fill the bill, but I liked the solution offerred by a solution we used in a school PC Lab (An Iomega 250 GB NAS for about $200. Basically, that allowed us to save images and restore them to other identical machines for cloning over the network via BartPE and Acronis.) Using FreeNAS in an older machine may work out quite nicely. My PCs are getting loaded up. It can be a real chore to sort through data and move or delete unneeded files. It seems simpler to just get a bigger drive, but that will eventually bring me back to disk janitorial duties. Who has the time for that? But when your drive gets too full, the PC perfomance bogs. I have to bite the bullet and delete and move. SIMPLIFY your life! Get a NAS! Though to be safe, it should be backed up too, (to DVDs?) which begs for a decent B-Up package!

ddmcp2000
ddmcp2000

That Netgear was a POS. It never worked correctly for me, even with "support" from Netgear, and eventually my return window just... ...closed. Now I have a 100 dollar paperweight! How's the reliability of this machine? How about a review? I do have to agree with some of the other posts... These photos show nothing useful.

smason
smason

"Using FreeNAS in an older machine may work out quite nicely. " FreeNAS has some performance issues when used with SAMBA. I wound up using Linux on an onld PIII with a cheap SATA RAID card.