PCs

Dinosaur Sighting: Microsoft Flight Simulator for the IBM PC Jr.

Closer

As the demo flight approaches you notice that there seem to be no other buildings in Chicago -- this early version of Flight Simulator certainly had limitations. Not sure I can earn my license if I never actually see but one building.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

18 comments
spdragoo
spdragoo

That's the game I always remember wanting to play on the "display PC" whenever I went to the electronics store as a kid. Makes me pine for my old combat flight simulator game, [b]Birds of Prey[/b] (Eletronic Arts). Was on a single 3.5" floppy, & you flew as either a US/NATO or a Soviet/Warsaw Pact pilot with just about any 1980s Cold War plane available (including being able to fly a B-52 or a B-1). And just like this game, a lot of the manual was about how to fly a plane, since it was super-realistic (i.e. you had to turn the engines on [i]before[/i] you could set your throttle speed, you had to check your flaps & landing gear, etc.). IIRC, it also had a bit of a "speed" problem with my later PCs. Alas, being a DOS/Win3.1 game, I had trouble getting it to run on my old XP machine, let alone my new Win7 machine....

Imperion1
Imperion1

I still have that game, for my old Atari Computer.

wayne
wayne

Flight Sim was always the first application I would run to test the performance of any new computer I got. I remember remarking to myself when I first got my hands on a 486 and ran Flight Sim "wow! who needs this much processing power?!" LOL. Well things still haven't changed. I still run Flight Sim every time i upgrade my computer

bobwes
bobwes

I have every copy of Microsoft Flight Simulator since it's inception. I even have the original version of FS by Sub-Logic that was originally written for the Commodore 64. I am disappointed with FS-X though because I don't have a gaming machine that it needs to operate it so I still use the 2004 version.

ykyrys
ykyrys

You're correct. As a former flyer of the Microsoft Flight Simulator, I found it a great experience for that time and enjoyed it immensly. I would however say that other games have taken my interest away, not only for the skill levels but also in the super graphics, which they offer.

marktboyer
marktboyer

Do you remember the bug in the Europe game? If you fly upside down and cut the engines, the plane "falls" straight up much quicker than flying up. The plane will eventually quit falling and level out once the maximum ceiling is achieved. Excellent way to quickly escape from the enemy planes.

opus61856
opus61856

Yep, you could fly from Chicago to Champaign, IL. As I recall, the software was developed by SubLOGIC which was a company located in Champaign IL. SubLOGIC was/is? a builder of flight simulators. That was a so cool game.

dir.edp
dir.edp

Hey, as I remember it was Chicago, not NYC. That's why you can't see the twin towers: basically, they aren't there.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...Flight Simulator was the grand test of compatibility. At the time, it was the single program that would test nearly all aspects of a computer's capability and compatibility with the standard IBM machine; especially for graphics. Back when we were first selling clones, booting up a disk of Flight Simulator was what ultimately made the sale. One interesting problem was that when clones with clock speeds above the standard 4.77 MHz started to appear, early versions of Flight Simulator actually ran too fast, as events were timed via the processor and not the system clock.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...from the original SubLogic for the Apple ][ on up. The originals had no shading or terrain databases; just rectangular outlines for airports and a grid outlining the "world". On the early versions, the screen updated roughly once a second.

adeal
adeal

You're not missing too much with the FSX version. I've found a few bugs in it too. The ILS localizer is way off for SAC 16R. The controllers also vector you in too close for some instrument approaches, unless you choose an IAP fix first. It also has crashed on me a few times. No idea why, as I run it on my game-only machine. Flight Sim is great for getting to know airports I've never been to, before I actually fly there - which has been very helpful. It also is good for keeping instrument skills sharp. Does anyone use the other flight simulator software, like X-Plane?

ARAHIGIHS
ARAHIGIHS

I'm too young to have played this game but I'm old enough to remember the many hours that I watched my dad fly from the different cities that the game offered. I still remember waiting until he put it on auto-pilot to go to the bathroom during a marathon flight and I quickly crashed the plane. Good stuff.

renaud.larue-langlois
renaud.larue-langlois

If I recall correctly, Bruce Artwick (whose name appears on the initial splash screen) was the founder of SubLOGIC and developper of the "SubLOGIC flight simulator" on the TRS-80, the Apple II, and the other popular 8 bits computers of the late 70's early 80's. A version was eventually released for the IBM PC. Microsoft licensed the game from subLOGIC and released it under the "Microssoft flight simulator" name. Bruce Artwick left subLOGIC and formed BAO (Bruce Artwick Organisation) in the mid-80's, keeping the copyright to "Flight Simulator" and licensed several versions of his software to Microsoft until BAO was purchased by Microsoft in the mid-90's. SubLOGIC continued to produce flight simulation software and released "Flight light" in the mid-90's. The company was purchased by Sierra who went on to realease the "Pro-Pilot" flight simulator.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin moderator

Well, no wonder it seemed so unfamiliar. I don't know why I always thought it was New York. However, in my defense I did spend most of my time in the 1917 mode.

sbarman
sbarman

And you take off from the (now non-existant) Miegs Field. The building you saw is the Sears Tower and the body of water is Lake Michigan. I know... I owned the first three versions of this!

ryan
ryan

Bzzzt,that building isn't the Sears Tower either. That building is the John Hancock Center (http://www.johnhancockcenterchicago.com/) The Sears Tower was the red wire frame building further inland in this version.

camainc
camainc

umm...that large body of water is Lake Michigan.