Patents

Dinosaur sightings: The world can be yours with Global Conquest

Good strategy games require a big manual full of information about battle damage, offensive power, and much much more. The manual for Global Conquest is 84 pages long.

It was also important because each installation required you to enter a code found in the manual into the program before it would allow you to continue. Now game publishers slip copy protection into your boot sector without telling you. I think I prefer 1992's method.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

3 comments
Horst Petard
Horst Petard

Hexed? On screen 10, I think you mean Avalon Hill hexagonal (six-sided), not hexadecimal (base 16). Anyway, thanks for the memories!

vbonanno
vbonanno

east

deICERAY
deICERAY

I remember this one - it never ran. I even got a new motherboard with a faster processor in an attempt to get it to work - no luck. It never ran. I still have the original box and disks and all - it's in the large pile marked "these games beat me." Most are from the DOS era. Privateer 2 was another never-ran, Daggerfall took forever to figure out how to get it to run, and it occasionally crashed anyway. I have boxes of games that "ran" in DOS that never actually ran; a common failing of earlier games; of course we weren't spending $60 a pop then either, so the failure was less costly at least in monetary terms. But buying, trying and troubleshooting was a passtime of its own, back in the day.