Leadership

Earn geek cred by doing these 15 things

Read at least one work by Clarke, Asimov, and Bradbury

4. Read at least one work by Clarke, Asimov, and Bradbury.
For more reading suggestions, take a look at my Geekend post A required reading list for geeks and Wally Bahny's TechRepublic gallery 75 must-read geek books.

Image courtesy: Amazon.com.

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27 comments
DHOLYER
DHOLYER

I've read many books from Clarke, Asimov Bradbury, Heinlein, Harlan Ellison and Ben Bova along with many more others, I had a collection of 1553 Sci-Fi books I've read, but that only makes you a Sci-Fi Fan. The list is missing things like NASA, Computer (programming) boioks, UFO books, and Star Trek. Other small things are a understanding of how new tech things work, And ASCII 7bit TTY ticker tape holding the listings of over 30 programs and many databases to a game or text adventure ofRescue Princess Lea from the Death Star. And watching the British shows Dr. Who, Space 1999 and UFO are extra credit. Then their is one thing left out, thinking sex meant love, not sex means reproduction and love means romance. This forgotten fact is why Geeks are labeled as Virgins.

Rainier_d
Rainier_d

Anyone else ever visit Rachel Nevada on the Extra Terrestrial Highway?

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

While looking at the 15 photos, how come many of the picture concepts are based on things from the 90's or the 00's. Is that not post fact-o, meaning they are not 80's which is when Geekdom ruled. I was born in 1960 sp the 80's was when I was in my 20's. And you left out a major factor, New Wave music (i.e. Devo or Euro bands like Culture Club).

John82654
John82654

I assume "Who shot first" is the ultimate question then?

achipman
achipman

Any geek worth his/her geekiness would have read Lord of the Rings trilogy AND The Hobbit at least three times, not just once. And would have a collection of comic books, some in plastic bags to preserve them for future geek civilizations (not that I didn't say future posterity - that require way too much personal, ummm, interaction than most geeks can handle.)

pizrround
pizrround

Don't forget ham radio, extra points for using CW (Morse code).

madmaccer
madmaccer

WOW !!! from the mouth of an unnamed plague victim " I'm not dead yet THUMP oohhh. I'm just a GEEK

guy
guy

My score was higher than I expected. Maybe I need to get a Linux tat, just to round things off nicely.

cknight
cknight

I actually qualify on all 15 of these things. Which is probably the reason that I am 44, overweight, single, and have no social life! ha ha ha

a.portman
a.portman

You meant one EACH right? Should probably add Dune and Piers Anthony to the list.

rick
rick

If you use XKCD art you should cite it. Shame on you.

yattwood
yattwood

1. Install _Slackware_ Linux on an old PC (uber-geek) 2. Write your own device drivers (uber-uber geek) 3. At a showing of 'The Matrix', ask "Which version?" when the Oracle is mentioned (well, I am a DBA...) 4. Demand that the dealer _find_ you a _manual_ transmission car, not accepting his or her "But-most-people-don't-want-to-drive-manual-in-traffic" garbage! 5. Wear your 'Bill-Gates-As-A-Borg' T-shirt at a Microsoft event......

gavin_bewick
gavin_bewick

Its French and not all that techy but just for the name how about Futuroscope?

derwil
derwil

Does being a member of TechRepublic count?

wolfjh
wolfjh

the Tux tattoo is not permanent, it's a press on... which allows for easy updates & modifications.

codesNstuff
codesNstuff

Ya know I always wondered why some of my freinds get that blank stare when your telling them about your recent D&D game or quote your favorite Monte Python or Star Wars lines. (lol)

innergeek
innergeek

While on vacation in Minnesota last month, we went two hours out of our way to visit the Spam Museum in Austin. And yes, they do have a display incorporating the legendary Monty Python sketch. The sketch plays continuously on a monitor (held \up by a viking) in a mock-up of the cafe in the sketch. Baked beans are off.

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

This was long before the Concept of Area 51 ever really became public, and even before my brother who was the driver, started working for Lockheed Martian, or at the time Martian Marietta. At the time I was reading many UFO books. And I had not known of Area 51 but had read of UFO's spotted around there. We had just spent 3 weeks camping at the botton of the Grand Canyon, and going to visit relatives before returning to Denver. On our way back we also visited relatives that lived by White Sands and Roswell. I labeled our return trip a UFO pilgrimage. And also a time where you said UFO in public they started having a strait jacket near by.

gwa53
gwa53

Yup, even stayed at the Lil Ale-E-Inn; got watched by the guys in the trucks; took pix of Steve's mailbox and the Extra Terrestrial Highway sign. It was too cool!

rocket ride
rocket ride

I'm guilty on all 15 charges, myself. I'm 48, overweight and single, but spoken for of late, and, yes, she's a geek. (Our D&D characters were an item 5 years before we were, if anyone cares.) My closest friends are pretty much all geeks. My SF book collection was in excess of 4,000 volumes 15 years ago when I stopped having time to count them. There's probably a couple of thousand more by now. Not only do I practice one of the classic ?bergeek hobbies (astronomy/astrophotography), I design gear for it for a living. (I never did say I worked on _computer_ hardware. ) Geekly enough for you? As an aside, is either Star Wars or Star Trek still sufficiently out of the mainstream to qualify as remotely geekly? I'm not trying to disparage either. I do like both. (Well, the recent 3 SW movies, not so much. George, next time hire someone who can write a bloody script!) I named my recently purchased used 12.5" f/5 Newtonian "Darth Vader" on acount of its being big (taller than I am, but not as big around ), black and shiny. BTW, the ?bergeek answer to the age-old qusetion "Kirk or Picard?" is either "Sinclair" or "Sheridan". --RR

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

Ellison has written more than almost anyone. Though not quite as geeky, he certainly is a literary figure.

jtalabach
jtalabach

To grok (pronounced /ˈɡrɒk/) is to share the same reality or line of thinking with another physical or conceptual entity. Author Robert A. Heinlein coined the term in his best-selling 1961 book Stranger in a Strange Land. In Heinlein's view, grokking is the intermingling of intelligence that necessarily affects both the observer and the observed. From the novel: Grok means to understand so thoroughly that the observer becomes a part of the observed?to merge, blend, intermarry, lose identity in group experience. It means almost everything that we mean by religion, philosophy, and science?and it means as little to us (because of our Earthly assumptions) as color means to a blind man. What could be geekier than that!

NickNielsen
NickNielsen moderator

The friends whose eyes don't glaze over when you're talking geek are geeks themselves. The rest just don't understand.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen moderator

IMO, any visit to a museum, no matter the subject, qualifies as geeky.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler moderator

you mean Heinlein. No geek points for you. ;)