Windows

Five free alternatives to Windows Explorer

NexusFile

NexusFile brings a bit of style to Windows. Not only is it skinnable, it also offers some great built-in features: tabbed browsing, built-in FTP, built-in archive, advanced rename, Split/Join File, and much more.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

15 comments
GegoireLeGros
GegoireLeGros

Form follows function. If you dont know what this realtes to then find out.

GegoireLeGros
GegoireLeGros

Another great step forward in the area of "I'm such a clever person I dont need to make myself clear when I present information in a public space". I started out looking at five apps to put on your usb stick thinking I'd find out something useful or interesting. Now I'm loooking at alternatives to Windows Explorer without even trying. A very backward step to present images when we have hypertext available. How can the writer go home thinking he has done a good days work. This presentation is unclear, complicated, inefficient and has wasted 5 minutes of my time. Multiply that 5 minutes by all the other unfortunate viewers.................

Vquest55
Vquest55

I like CubicExplorer because of it's tabs ... BUT (as usual) I have XP & it crashes my system so looking for another.

kirkbubul
kirkbubul

I completely agree with cuulblu; slide shows sucketh full sore. The are sometimes redeemed by an accompanying blog, but not this time. Like cuulblu, I've decided to boycott them.

objunior.bhz
objunior.bhz

any piece of software which wants to be named as replacement must: 1.have tabs, ie, multiple folders 2.show folder sizes 3.show any file and its attributes 4.show dates: creation, last acess, last modified 5.work in a network environment as fast as in a single computer 6.support drag'n'drop 7.make intelligent copy and move, replacing just what asked for making them faster operations is this asking too much?

jsteiger
jsteiger

For more than a decade, the very first application I've installed on a Windows machine is Total Commander, the amazingly efficient and robust shareware application by Christian Ghisler. Besides being roughly ten times as fast as Windows Explorer for file searching and movement, Total Commander has a host of other features. 1. Built in file synchronization. I carry my complete workspace on a 32gb Corsair Survivor, which also holds my 3gb Outlook pst file. Total Commander cross-checks roughly 8500 directories in about a minute, then synchronizes the files. 2. Total Commander has built-in archive file capabilities. It looks inside zip, rar, etc. files and treats them just like directories. 3. Very efficient file search. Once a search is completed, you have the option of creating a file list that can then be renamed, deleted, moved, etc. 4. Built in, very extensive file renaming capabilities. 5. Built in FTP that sees your ftp sites as directories. And that is just the beginning. An engineer friend introduced me to Total Commander more than a decade ago. He said, "You will not want to live without it once you've tried it." Every single friend I've introduced the program too has said the same thing. And by the way, you can run multiple instances! You can run it for free for an extended, full function trial. Just go to www.ghisler.com. This is one of the best pieces of software ever written.

cuulblu
cuulblu

Give me an article I can quickly scan and find what is relevant. I despise these slide shows. I usually don't even bother to click to the second frame.

tpmullen
tpmullen

Total Commander, previously Windows Commander (before a threatened Microsoft lawsuit) is another one of those programs that you can go to constantly. It has been around ever since Norton gave up their Commander, and it just keeps getting better and better. Total Commander allows you to easily locate, view and transfer files. It also can zip, unzip (using any number of compression schemes,) combine, cut up, and inspect/change various properties of any file or set of files (creation date, default program, name, etc) It has an extremely powerful and versatile search function that will allow you to find exactly what you are looking for. Total Commander uses the standard 2 column layout, and allows you to easily move files between two different directories (or copy them if you want) using either drag-and-drop, command button use or command line instructions. Finally, Total Commander is shareware. You do not need to pay for it if you do not want to. There are no limitations imposed on the free version, though you do have to enter a randomly generated number every time you start it up. That requirement is eliminated if you pay for a product key.

Kent Lion
Kent Lion

If something as basic as a file manager still has bugs and deficiencies after almost 20 years in existence, something is wrong with the developer's priorities.

GBowes54
GBowes54

I don't know why there is no mention of EF Commander in your column. It's a fantastic file manager, with versions for almost everyone. If you remember the old Norton Commander, you'll feel right at home. It is the first program I start when I boot up my PC, and I use it constantly. You can find it at "http://www.efsoftware.com/cw/e.htm", as well as a good description of it's features. There is even a free version, if you only want to try it out.

dave
dave

I've been using it for years. Fast, small, reliable. Amazing breadth & depth of functionality.

andrew.glenda
andrew.glenda

What happened to powerdesk pro (lite) and nexus looks a lot like Norton commander from DOS days

Fuzzilla
Fuzzilla

Did you miss the memo: Note: This list is also available as a photo gallery.

Rob Irwin
Rob Irwin

Can't work with out it - one of two essential items in my accessories toolbox! Pity Win 8 couldn't provide the same functionality and ease of use.