Apps

Five Web Apps to make you smarter

WikiHow

This is a problem many desktop support people probably face: the user has put in a help desk ticket because they've got this spot on their screen that won't go away.  Most IT people would probably fiddle with it and maybe get around to try some of the steps in this article by trial and error, but WikiHow can save you that precious time by giving you steps to follow right away.

Screenshot of WikiHow website by Wally Bahny for TechRepublic

9 comments
wheres_my_stuff
wheres_my_stuff

In these times of AJAX, it still navigates through the most basic html features, losing positioning of the page at every slide flip, it reloads the whole page, it is slow, it is tiresome on the eyes, and it is so cumbersome that it seriously keeps the use from willing to see the content despite his interest on the content. Potential viewers are being kept away because of this interface.

Robiisan
Robiisan

Where's the "bonus sixth selection" promised in the text for the first image? Does he mean TR itself? Or was there supposed to be a little more here?

jonniebgood
jonniebgood

'Here's an example Group Policy ADM file that disables writing data to USB drives. It's likely that many IT professionals could use something like this to keep private company data from walking.' Somebody should clue our Canadian federal government in on this, as well as the B.C. provincial one. USB sticks with confidential personal info seem to have learned how to grow legs and then lose themselves.

jamiejtturner
jamiejtturner

It's tough to have x% of readers go sideways on your efforts to share important resource info. They ought to review the apps and use any for their benefit...if they'd but stop their b___tching. But they won't, so sad; it's in their nature. And so thickens the writer's skin. For my part, I appreciate your article - well done. I will review and hope to benefit from what you've shared with us. Muchas Gracias!

andrelle33
andrelle33

I agree. Try something like Evernote. Wikis and information sites are not apps.

Muhammad Mahdi
Muhammad Mahdi

These are websites. Since when did we start calling them apps as well?

shawncollins24
shawncollins24

Muhammad, I'm not quite sure what exactly your definition of an "app" is, but it's obviously wrong. Here's but one definition of an app: "An application program (sometimes shortened to application) is any program designed to perform a specific function directly for the user or, in some cases, for another application program." Other definitions are similar. Just because the app is web-based doesn't preclude it from being an app! HTML 5 is greatly expanding what can be done over the web. Apparently, your definition of an app is one where the installation and processing is all done locally (which is incorrect). I guess in closing, I'll say that I get EXTREMELY irritated when people "dis" articles with baseless comments JUST BECAUSE they feel they have to make a comment. No matter how you look at is, Muhammad, the fact that an app is accessed and utilized over the internet and through a web-based GUI doesn't NOT mean it is not an app. I guess I'll explain it simply: Yes, those are websites but they host apps that perform a function for the end user. 'Nuff said. Shawn Collins

Muhammad Mahdi
Muhammad Mahdi

"A program that gives a computer instructions that provide the user with tools to accomplish a task" Most of the"apps" mentioned provide information not tools. Next we'll say wikipedia in an app and so is Yahoo news and Techrepublic.

jim2350
jim2350

I have "apps" on my phone that tell me about good restaurants, where to find an ATM, the weather in several locations, financial information, the definition and pronunciation of almost any English word I come across and sports scores in just about any sport I can think of as well as a slew of other "apps" that do various things for me. By your definition, someone should drop Apple and Google an email and let them know that they aren't really providing anyone with an "app" - they're just providing "information". I believe you are trying to put too fine a point on the situation. Once upon a time, your definition would have worked. In today's world, where consumers are looking to purchase always-on, ready-at-anytime-on-any-device services to accomplish what they once did with the purchase of a software program, the definition of an "app" can no longer be restricted to simply a tool. It's much bigger than that and evolving everyday. And if TechRepublic provides me with information someday that helps me in my job, increases my awareness about training/learning opportunities or saves me money in my budget, then I will call them an "app"!